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eBook American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War: Producing and Contesting Containment, 1947-1962 (Studies Theatre Hist  Culture) ePub

eBook American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War: Producing and Contesting Containment, 1947-1962 (Studies Theatre Hist Culture) ePub

by Bruce A. Mcconachie

  • ISBN: 0877458626
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Bruce A. Mcconachie
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University Of Iowa Press; y First printing edition (December 1, 2003)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1944 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1402 kb
  • Other: mbr rtf txt mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 911

Description

In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containmentOCowhat happens when we categorize a play, a. .

In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containmentOCowhat happens when we categorize a play, a television show, or anything we view as having an inside, an outside, and a boundary between the twoOCoas the dominant metaphor of cold war theatergoing. Original and provocative, a"American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War"ailluminates the mind of the spectator in the context of Cold War culture; it uses cognitive studies and media theory to move away from semiotics and psychoanalysis, forging a new way of interpreting theater history.

In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containment-what happens when we.

In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containment-what happens when we categorize a play, a television show, or anything .The Broadway theater of 1947 to 1962 played a small but significant part in the dominant culture of the era. Necessarily bound by the profit motive, theatrical producers on the Great White Way sought middle-and upper-class attendance for their shows and generally turned their backs on working class families. Audience surveys done byPlaybillduring the 1950s found that only about 10 percent of the audience identified themselves as working class.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Modern Drama 4. (2005) 613-615Bruce A. McConachie

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Modern Drama 4. McConachie  .

Электронная книга "American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War: Producing and Contesting Containment, 1947-1962", Bruce A. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War: Producing and Contesting Containment, 1947-1962" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Iowa City: University of Iowa Press, 2003. Recommend this journal.

The Cold War was reflected in culture through music, movies, books, television and other media, as well as sports and social beliefs and behavior. One major element of the Cold War was the threat of a nuclear war; another was espionage

The Cold War was reflected in culture through music, movies, books, television and other media, as well as sports and social beliefs and behavior. One major element of the Cold War was the threat of a nuclear war; another was espionage. Many works use the Cold War as a backdrop, or directly take part in fictional conflict between the United States and the Soviet Union. The period 1953–62 saw Cold War themes first enter the mainstream culture as a public preoccupation

Studies in theatre history & culture.

University of Iowa Press. Studies in theatre history & culture. This item appears on. List: AM103: Comparative History, Literature, and Film of the Americas. Section: Cold War America.

In this study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containment - what happens when we categorize a play . In an epilogue, he discusses the legacy of Cold War theater form 1962 to 1992.

In this study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containment - what happens when we categorize a play, a television shows, or anything we view as having an inside, an outside, and a boundary between the two - as the dominant metaphor of Cold War theatergoing.

In this groundbreaking study, Bruce McConachie uses the primary metaphor of containmentOCowhat happens when we categorize a play, a television show, or anything we view as having an inside, an outside, and a boundary between the twoOCoas the dominant metaphor of cold war theatergoing. Drawing on the cognitive psychology and linguistics of George Lakoff and Mark Johnson, he provides unusual access to the ways in which spectators in the cold war years projected themselves into stage figures that gave them pleasure.McConachie reconstructs these cognitive processes by relying on scripts, set designs, reviews, memoirs, and other evidence. After establishing his theoretical framework, he focuses on three archtypal figures of containment significant in Cold War culture, Empty Boys, Family Circles, and Fragmented Heroes. McConachie uses a range of plays, musicals, and modern dances from the dominant culture of the Cold War to discuss these figures, includinga"The Seven Year Itch," a"Cat on a Hot Tin Roof";a"The King and I," "A Raisin in the Sun," a"Night Journey," anda"The Crucible."aIn an epilogue, he discusses the legacy of Cold War theater from 1962 to 1992.Original and provocative, a"American Theater in the Culture of the Cold War"ailluminates the mind of the spectator in the context of Cold War culture; it uses cognitive studies and media theory to move away from semiotics and psychoanalysis, forging a new way of interpreting theater history."