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eBook Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering. ePub

eBook Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering. ePub

by Marie-Luise Kohlke,Christian Gutleben

  • ISBN: 9042032308
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Marie-Luise Kohlke,Christian Gutleben
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Rodopi (November 24, 2010)
  • Pages: 420
  • ePub book: 1857 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1261 kb
  • Other: azw mbr doc mobi
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 639

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Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben: Introduction: Bearing After-Witness to the Nineteenth Century .

Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben: Introduction: Bearing After-Witness to the Nineteenth Century Poethics and Existential Extremity: Crises of Faith, Identity, and Sexuality Christian Gutleben and Julian Wolfreys: Postmodernism Revisited: The Ethical Drive of Postmodern Trauma in Neo-Victorian Fiction Georges Letissier: Trauma by Proxy in the Age of Testimony : Paradoxes of Darwinism in the Neo-Victorian Novel Catherine Pesso-Miquel: Apes

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness .

Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering. Neo-Victorian Series). Neo-Victorian Gothic offers fascinating insights into hybrid anxieties and generic miscegenation, ranging from cross-over myths to feminist and post-colonial attempts to reclaim the bare bones of their past.

Manliness and Masculinities in Nineteenth-century Britain: Essays on Gender, Family, and Empire . In Kohlke, Marie-Luise; Gutleben, Christian (ed. Neo-Victorian tropes of taruma: The politics of bearing after-witness to nineteenth-century suffering. Neo-Victorian series.

Manliness and Masculinities in Nineteenth-century Britain: Essays on Gender, Family, and Empire (Women and men in history). a b c d Alderson, David (1998). Mansex Fine: Religion, manliness and imperialism and nineteenth-century British culture. Manchester University Press. Alderson, David (1998). 1. Amsterdam: Rodopi.

Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben, ed. msterdam and New York: Rodopi. Neo-Victorian Series, vol. I, 2010.

Neo-victorian tropes of trauma. the politics of bearing after-witness to nineteenth-century suffering. Isabel Mª Andrés Cuevas+−. Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben, ed.

Similarly, proof of scholarly interest in Neo-Victorian studies is found in the proliferation of critical volumes on the topic, which, in the same year, 2010, included: Marie-Louise Kohlke’s and Christian Gutleben’s ‘Neo- Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering’; Louisa Hadley’s ‘Neo-Victorian Fiction and Historical Narrative: The Victorians and Us’ . Neo-Victorian novels can be considered, among other things, as an attempt at exorcising the past, as well as a reflection on its continuity in the present and/or a way of projecting the future. Therefore, they overtly play with the spectre of time.

NeoVictorian tropes of trauma: The politics of bearing afterwitness to nineteenthcentury suffering. We are a century removed from Queen Victoria’s death, yet the culture that bears her name is alive and well across the globe

NeoVictorian tropes of trauma: The politics of bearing afterwitness to nineteenthcentury suffering. Neo-Victorian Fiction and Historical Narrative. We are a century removed from Queen Victoria’s death, yet the culture that bears her name is alive and well across the globe. Not only is Victorian culture the subject of lively critical debate, but it draws widespread interest from popular audiences and consumers. Functions of Victorian Culture at the Present Time addresses the theme of the Victorians’ continuing legacy and its effect on our own culture and perception of the world.

Kohlke, Marie-Luise, and Christian Gutelben, eds. 2010. Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering. Writing History, Writing Trauma. Baltimore, MD: John Hopkins University Press.

Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben (eds), Neo-Victorian Gothic: Horror .

Marie-Luise Kohlke and Christian Gutleben (eds), Neo-Victorian Gothic: Horror, Violence and Degeneration in the Re-Imagined Nineteenth Century (Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2012). This is the third volume in Gutleben and Kohle's neo-Victorian series (Vol. 1, Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing After-Witness to Nineteenth-Century Suffering ; and Vol. 2, Neo-Victorian Families: Gender and Sexual and Cultural Politics ).

In Neo-Victorian Tropes of Trauma: The Politics of Bearing. Amsterdam & New York: Rodopi, 2010. Excerpts from Peter Carey’s Jack Maggs. Queensland: University of Queensland Press, 1997 and Lloyd Jones’s Mister Pip. London: John Murray, 2006. 5. Science and Religion John Glendening, Science and Religion in Neo-Victorian Novels: Eye of the Ichthyosaur.

This collection constitutes the first volume in Rodopi's Neo-Victorian Series, which explores the prevalent, but often problematic, re-vision of the long nineteenth century in contemporary culture. Here is presented for the first time an extended analysis of the conjunction of neo-Victorian fiction and trauma discourse, highlighting the significant interventions in collective memory staged by the belated aesthetic working-through of historical catastrophes, as well as their traces in the present. The neo-Victorian's privileging of marginalised voices and its contestation of masternarratives of historical progress construct a patchwork of competing but equally legitimate versions of the past, highlighting on-going crises of existential extremity, truth and meaning, nationhood and subjectivity. This volume will be of interest to both researchers and students of the growing field of neo-Victorian Studies, as well as scholars in trauma theory, ethics, and memory and heritage studies. Interrogating processes of cultural commemoration and forgetting and how to ethically represent the suffering of cultural and temporal others, the collection negotiates the temptations of appropriative empathy and voyeuristic spectacle, while all the time struggling with the central paradox: the ethical imperative to bear after-witness to history's silenced victims in the face of the potential unrepresentability of extreme suffering.