cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » Look Who's Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram (Hellenistica Groningana)
eBook Look Who's Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram (Hellenistica Groningana) ePub

eBook Look Who's Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram (Hellenistica Groningana) ePub

by M.A. Tueller

  • ISBN: 9042920114
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: M.A. Tueller
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Peeters Publishers (December 31, 2008)
  • Pages: 231
  • ePub book: 1855 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1953 kb
  • Other: lit doc lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 538

Description

Look Who's Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram. Nature and Science in Hellenistic Poetry.

Look Who's Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram. 14. Sistakou E. Reconstructing the Epic. Gods and Religion in Hellenistic Poetry. 17. The Aesthetics of Darkness. 18. Cusset C., Le Meur-Weissman N., Levin F. Mythe et pouvoir à l'époque hellénistique. Hellenistic Poetry in Context.

Details Coming Soon Look Who's Talking. Hellenistica Groningana. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything.

Look Who's Talking book. Among the most significant hellenistic innovations are the development of a passerby motif and the evolution of epigram's tendency to address its inherent writtenness

Look Who's Talking book. Among the most significant hellenistic innovations are the development of a passerby motif and the evolution of epigram's tendency to address its inherent writtenness. The book also traces the development of the ancient habit of equating an artistic image with the thing or being it represented; Nossis, later joined by Theocritus and Callimachus, developed a stance from which they could critique this subtle equation.

Look Who's Talking examines the methods by which the ancient reader identified the speaker and addressee of epigram, and how these methods were manipulated by hellenistic epigrammatists. Conventions in place from epigram's inscribed heritage were used, at first, to maintain the conceit of inscription, but later formed the basis for mixing of epigrammatic subgenres or even, in the case of Asclepiades, the creation of erotic epigram.

Look Who’s Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram. Arion's Lyre examines how Hellenistic poetic culture adapted, reinterpreted, and transformed Archaic Greek lyric through a complex process of textual, cultural, and creative reception. The Cambridge Companion to Greek Lyric, Cambridge.

innovations in voice and identity in Hellenistic epigram. by Michael A. Tueller. Hellenistica Groningana - v. 13, Hellenistica Groningana - v. 13. Classifications. Published 2008 by Peeters in Leuven, Belgium, Dudley, MA. Written in English. History and criticism, Greek Epigrams, Greek poetry.

Hellenistic epigram, as . 11 (see above concerning the identity of the speaker) or Call. Tueller reminds us, "is a child with more than one parent" (p. 205). This is especially true of the erotic epigram with its long and varied pedigree of short love-poems written in several meters and belonging to different genres. 7 in Tradition and Innovation in Hellenistic Poetry of 2004, 4 the book of . Tueller (henceforth ". ) is the first attempt at categorizing the different forms in which this re-use took place in a systematic way. Chap.

Tueller, Michael A. Look Who’s Talking: Innovations in Voice and Identity in Hellenistic Epigram. Leuven: Peeters, 2008 (Hellenistica Groningana 13). xii, 231 pp. Marco Fantuzzi, BMCR 2009. Vara Donado, J. 'Melos y elegia. Emerita 40, 1972, 433-51. Poetriarum octo, Erinnae, Myrus, Myrtidis, Corinnae, Telesillae, Praxillae, Nossidis, Anytae, fragmenta et elogia. Compiled and maintained by Martine Cuypers, Trinity College Dublin.

No current Talk conversations about this book.

Look Who's Talking examines the methods by which the ancient reader identified the speaker and addressee of epigram, and how these methods were manipulated by Hellenistic epigrammatists. Conventions in place from epigram's inscribed heritage were used, at first, to maintain the conceit of inscription, but later formed the basis for mixing of epigrammatic subgenres or even, in the case of Asclepiades, the creation of erotic epigram. Among the most significant Hellenistic innovations are the development of a passerby motif and the evolution of epigram's tendency to address its inherent writtenness. The book also traces the development of the ancient habit of equating an artistic image with the thing or being it represented; Nossis, later joined by Theocritus and Callimachus, developed a stance from which they could critique this subtle equation. This book thinks of Hellenistic epigram the way its authors did - from the background of inscription - and consequently discovers many of the places where Hellenistic epigrammatists hoped to make their mark.