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eBook Tracing the  Connected Narrative: Arctic Exploration in British Print Culture, 1818-1860 (Studies in Book and Print Culture) ePub

eBook Tracing the Connected Narrative: Arctic Exploration in British Print Culture, 1818-1860 (Studies in Book and Print Culture) ePub

by Janice Cavell

  • ISBN: 0802092802
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Janice Cavell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Scholarly Publishing Division; 1 edition (December 27, 2008)
  • Pages: 352
  • ePub book: 1177 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1779 kb
  • Other: rtf docx lrf doc
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 163

Description

Series: Studies in Book and Print Culture.

Series: Studies in Book and Print Culture. Published by: University of Toronto Press. Janice Cavell uncovers similarities between the presentation of exploration reports in periodicals and the serialized fiction that, she argues, predisposed readers to take an interest in the prolonged quest for the Northwest Passage.

Studies in Book and Print Culture. xi + 332 p, illustrated with plates, hard cover. UK £40. Article in Polar Record 46(04) · January 2010. Cite this publication. H. W. G. Lewis-Jones. Tracing the connected narrative: arctic exploration in british print culture, 1818–1860. Toronto and London: University of Toronto Press. Studies in Book and Print Culture. Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service

Studies in Book and Print Culture. Find out more about the Kindle Personal Document Service.

Tracing the Connected Narrative book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

Tracing the Connected Narrative book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Tracing the Connected Narrative: Arctic Exploration in British Print Culture, 1818-1860 as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Toronto and London: University of Toronto Press. Published: 18 March 2010. by Cambridge University Press (CUP). Polar Record, Volume 47, pp 93-94; doi:10.

Cavell also takes a narrow view of "print culture", neglecting visual materials; aside from brief mentions of illustrations in books and the press, the path she traces is limited to alphabetic text

Cavell also takes a narrow view of "print culture", neglecting visual materials; aside from brief mentions of illustrations in books and the press, the path she traces is limited to alphabetic text. This seems odd, given that the book's cover is based on a handbill for a moving panorama of the Arctic that appeared in 1875. Nevertheless, Tracing the Connected Narrative adds much to our understanding of the substance of what was, in many ways, the first great public debate over the value of geographical exploration

Open Journal Systems.

Open Journal Systems.

My Content (1). Recently viewed (1). Tracing the Connected. Janice Cavell is a historian in the Historical Section of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada

My Content (1). Please find details to our shipping fees here. RRP: Recommended Retail Price. Recommend to Librarian. Janice Cavell is a historian in the Historical Section of Foreign Affairs and International Trade Canada.

Tracing the connected narrative: Arctic exploration in British print culture, 1818-1860.

Tracing the connected narrative. Tracing the connected narrative. 1 2 3 4 5. Want to Read. Tracing the connected narrative: Arctic exploration in British print culture, 1818-1860. 2008, University of Toronto Press. Libraries near you: WorldCat.

By the 1850s, journalists and readers alike perceived Britain's search for the Northwest Passage as an ongoing story in the literary sense. Because this 'story' appeared, like so many nineteenth-century novels, in a series of installments in periodicals and reviews, it gained an appeal similar to that of fiction. Tracing the Connected Narrative examines written representations of nineteenth-century British expeditions to the Canadian Arctic. It places Arctic narratives in the broader context of the print culture of their time, especially periodical literature, which played an important role in shaping the public's understanding of Arctic exploration.

Janice Cavell uncovers similarities between the presentation of exploration reports in periodicals and the serialized fiction that, she argues, predisposed readers to take an interest in the prolonged quest for the Northwest Passage. Cavell examines the same parallel in relation to the famous disappearance and subsequent search for the Franklin expedition. After the fate of Sir John Franklin had finally been revealed, the Illustrated London News printed a list of earlier articles on the missing expedition, suggesting that the public might wish to re-read them in order to 'trace the connected narrative' of this chapter in the Arctic story. Through extensive research and reference to new archival material, Cavell undertakes this task and, in the process, recaptures and examines the experience of nineteenth-century readers.