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eBook Revising the Word and the World: Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism ePub

eBook Revising the Word and the World: Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism ePub

by Vèvè A. Clark,Ruth-Ellen Boetcher Joeres,Madelon Sprengnether

  • ISBN: 0226400646
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Vèvè A. Clark,Ruth-Ellen Boetcher Joeres,Madelon Sprengnether
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press Journals; 1 edition (October 1, 1993)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1100 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1647 kb
  • Other: txt lrf lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 510

Description

The nearly 50 short pieces of travel writing that comprise this volume display such a wealth of perspectives and explore such a variety of locales that the book is a splendid adventure in itself.

The nearly 50 short pieces of travel writing that comprise this volume display such a wealth of perspectives and explore such a variety of locales that the book is a splendid adventure in itself. One of the most stunning books that deals with faraway places has just hit the stands

Veve Clark, Madelon M Sprengnether, +1 author R. Joeres. That literature is a form of social action has been an implicit assumption of feminist literary criticism since its emergence in academia some 25 years ago.

Veve Clark, Madelon M Sprengnether, +1 author R. This assumption has served not only to heighten the awareness of gender construction and response in literature, but also to redefine the process and goals of literary criticism itself. Three interviews with writers of different nationalities (Audre Lorde, Simone de Beauvoir, and Carmen Naranjo) introduce topics echoed in the essays tha. ONTINUE READING.

Clark, V, Sprengnether, MM, Sprengnether, M (e. & Joeres, R-E (e. 1993, Revising the Word and the World: Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism. Clark V, Sprengnether MM, Sprengnether M, (e., Joeres R-E, (e. Revising the Word and the World: Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism. Chicago: Chicago UP, 1993.

the difference : cultural imperialism and Ruth St. Denis's "Radha" of 1906, by Jane Desmond - Poetry as a strategy of power : the case of. .Clark, Veve A; Joeres, Ruth-Ellen . 1939-; Sprengnether, Madelon. Denis's "Radha" of 1906, by Jane Desmond - Poetry as a strategy of power : the case of Riffian Berber women, by Terri Brint Joseph - Womanism : the dynamics of the contemporary black female novel in English, by Chikwenye Okonjo Ogunyemi - Narrative of community : the identification of a genre, by Sandra A. Zagarell.

Sandra A. Zagarell, Narrative of Community: The Identification of a Genre, Revising the Word and the World: Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism, ed. by VèVè A. Clark, Ruth-Ellen B. Joeres, and Madelon Sprengnether (Chicago & London: The University of Chicago Press, 1993). Joeres, and Madelon Sprengnether (Chicago & London: The University of Chicago Press, 1993), 25. oogle Scholar. 36. Please see Localism, Globalism, and Cultural Identity by Mike Featherstone in Global/Local: Cultural Production and the Transnational Imaginary, ed. by Rob Wilson and Wimal Dissanayake (Durham & London: Duke University Press, 1996).

Essays in Feminist Literary Criticism. by Veve A. Joeres, Madelon Sprengnether. Published October 1, 1993 by University of Chicago Press Journals. Feminism and literature, Feminist literary criticism, Women and literature, Feministische literatuurkritiek, Literaturkritik, Feminismus, Feministische t, Aufsatzsammlung, Feministische t gnd, Critique féministe.

Dust cover is intact; pages are clean and are not marred by notes or folds of any kind.

Feminist literary criticism can be traced back to medieval times, with some arguing that Geoffrey Chaucer’s Wife of.Within second-wave feminism, three phases can be defined: the feminine phase, the feminist phase, and the female phase

Feminist literary criticism can be traced back to medieval times, with some arguing that Geoffrey Chaucer’s Wife of Bath could be an example of early feminist literally critics. Within second-wave feminism, three phases can be defined: the feminine phase, the feminist phase, and the female phase. During the feminine phase, female writers adhered to male values. In the feminist phase, there was a theme of criticism of women's role in society.

Feminist Literary Criticism rejects patriarchal norms in literature that privileges masculine ways of thinking and marginalizes women politically, economically and psychologically. Key words: Women, feminist literary criticism, novel, patriarchy, literature. As a social movement, feminist criticism highlights the various ways women in particular have been oppressed, suppressed and represse. (Bressler 185) One of the most potent aspects of feminist literary criticism is to uncover the latent dynamics in a novel relevant to women’s inferior role in society.

That literature is a form of social action has been an implicit assumption of feminist literary criticism since its emergence in academia some twenty-five years ago. This assumption has served not only to heighten the awareness of gender construction and response in literature, but also to redefine the process and goals of literary criticism itself. Three powerful interviews with writers of different nationalities (Audre Lorde, Simone de Beauvoir, and Carmen Naranjo) introduce topics echoed in the essays that follow: the interplay between women's writing and feminist theory, the politics of writing, and the roles of race, class, and sexual orientation in artistic production. These issues are engaged on a theoretical level by three essays that represent today's most prominent areas of concern for feminist literary criticism. The theoretical perspectives advanced in this anthology provide models for reading the traditional expressions of women worldwide including oratory and performance as well as literature in the more conventional sense. Contributors include Jane Flax on "Postmodernism and Gender Relations in Feminist Theory," Evelyn Brooks Higginbotham on "African-American Women's History and the Metalanguage of Race," Paula Bennett on "Female Sexual Imagery and Feminist Psychoanalytic Theory," Leslie Rabine on "Social Gender and Symbolic Gender in the Writings of Maxine Hong Kingston," Joyce Zonana on "Feminist Orientalism and the Structure of Jane Eyre," Jane Desmond on "Cultural Imperialism and Ruth St. Denis's 'Radha' of 1906," Terri Brint Joseph on "Poetry as a Strategy of Power: The Case of Riffian Berber Women," Chikwenye Ogunyemi on "The Contemporary Black Female Novel in English," and Sandra Zagarell on "Narrative of Community." This collection is especially appropriate for scholars and students of feminist literary criticism, women's studies, English, and ethnic studies. Essays were originally published in Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society.