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eBook Honey for the Bears (Norton Paperback Fiction) ePub

eBook Honey for the Bears (Norton Paperback Fiction) ePub

by Anthony Burgess

  • ISBN: 0393314413
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Anthony Burgess
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Reissue edition (May 17, 1996)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1104 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1439 kb
  • Other: rtf lit txt doc
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 839

Description

Anthony Burgess (1917–1993) is the author of many works, including A Clockwork Orange, The Wanting Seed, Nothing Like the Sun, Honey for the Bears, The Long Day Wanes, The Doctor Is Sick, and ReJoyce.

Anthony Burgess (1917–1993) is the author of many works, including A Clockwork Orange, The Wanting Seed, Nothing Like the Sun, Honey for the Bears, The Long Day Wanes, The Doctor Is Sick, and ReJoyce. Series: Norton Paperback Fiction.

Books by anthony burgess in w. w. norton paperback. Moreover, I have been travelling this route since long before you were born

Books by anthony burgess in w. Moreover, I have been travelling this route since long before you were born.

First published as a Norton paperback 1978; reissued 1996, 2013

First published as a Norton paperback 1978; reissued 1996, 2013. Printed in the United States of America. For information about permission to reproduce selections from this book, write to Permissions, W. Norton & Company, In. 500 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10110. For information about special discounts for bulk purchases, please contact.

Honey for the Bears book. Paperback, 272 pages

Honey for the Bears book. Paperback, 272 pages. Published August 5th 2013 by W. Norton Company (first published 1963). I think Burgess could write a novel about a bowl of soup, and it would be wildly entertaining. The way he uses words is entertaining in an of itself. the plot could almost be considered afterthought, if it weren't so indulgently wacky.

Continuous, fizzing energy. Honey for the Bears is a triumph. NEUROMANCER - Miscellaneous. Neuromancer (Ace Science Fiction). One of the most important and influential novels of our time.

Manufacturer: W. Norton & Company Release date: 17 May 1996 ISBN-10 : 0393314413 ISBN-13: 9780393314410. add. Separate tags with commas, spaces are allowed. Use tags to describe a product . for a movie Themes heist, drugs, kidnapping, coming of age Genre drama, parody, sci-fi, comedy Locations paris, submarine, new york.

Author:Burgess, Anthony. Honey for the Bears (Norton Paperback Fiction). Publisher:WW Norton & Co. Book Binding:Paperback. World of Books Australia was founded in 2005. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Honey for the Bears by Anthony Burgess (Paperback, 2001). Pre-owned: lowest price.

Burgess was born at 91 Carisbrook Street in Harpurhey, a suburb of Manchester, England, to Catholic parents . His Malayan trilogy The Long Day Wanes was Burgess's first published fiction. Its three books are Time for a Tiger, The Enemy in the Blanket and Beds in the East.

Burgess was born at 91 Carisbrook Street in Harpurhey, a suburb of Manchester, England, to Catholic parents, Joseph and Elizabeth Wilson. He described his background as lower middle class; growing up during the Great Depression, his parents, who were shopkeepers, were fairly well off, as the demand for their tobacco and alcohol wares remained constant. Devil of a State is a follow-on to the trilogy, set in a fictionalised version of Brunei.

Continuous, fizzing energ. oney for the Bears is a triumph. Kingsley Amis, New York Times A sharply written satire, Honey for the Bears sends an unassuming antiques dealer, Paul Hussey, to Russia to do one final deal on the black market as a favor for a dead friend's wife

Continuous, fizzing energ. Kingsley Amis, New York Times A sharply written satire, Honey for the Bears sends an unassuming antiques dealer, Paul Hussey, to Russia to do one final deal on the black market as a favor for a dead friend's wife. Even on the ship's voyage across, the Russian sensibility begins to pervade: lots of secrets and lots of vodka

"There are so few genuinely entertaining novels around that we ought to cheer whenever one turns up. Continuous, fizzing energy. . . .Honey for the Bears is a triumph."―Kingsley Amis, New York Times

A sharply written satire, Honey for the Bears sends an unassuming antiques dealer, Paul Hussey, to Russia to do one final deal on the black market as a favor for a dead friend's wife. Even on the ship's voyage across, the Russian sensibility begins to pervade: lots of secrets and lots of vodka. When his American wife is stricken by a painful rash and he is interrogated at his hotel by Soviet agents who know that he is trying to sell stylish synthetic dresses to the masses starved for fashion, his precarious inner balance is thrown off for good. More drink follows, discoveries of his wife's illicit affair with another woman, and his own submerged sexual feelings come breaking through the surface, bubbling up in Russian champagne and caviar.

Comments

Manris Manris
Were I more of an academic, I would consider that at this point I am starting to get a picture of who Anthony Burgess was and the over-arching themes of his work were (Russia, linguistics, homosexuality, James Joyce, etc). Any casual reader who is only familiar with his work through the rightly famous A Clockwork Orange (Norton Critical Editions) would be aware of Burgess's Russo-phile ways. This book is able to use the Russia of the sixties to show the absurdities that arise in both the communist east and the capitalist west. This book is a wonderful social commentary that is strongly rooted in its time and social reality, which must be why it has lingered on the back-list though still in print because of the author's other, more popular work.

That it has lingered is surprising, since it is more than just a political and historical document. It is a first-rate farce. It stars Paul Hussey, a member of the bourgeois, shop-owning striving English middle class. His friend [and sometimes lover] has passed, leaving a widow. The friend had a history of selling western clothes on the Soviet black market, and Paul is trying to follow through one last time to bring home some profit for his friend's widow and have a little holiday himself. Needless to say, the trip does not turn out as planned, bit to run through all the fun twists and turns would ruin the fun and be a third-rate narrative compared to what Burgess is able spin.

What surprised me was researching the book and finding out that it was not made into a movie that I was able to find. This would have been the perfect vehicle for a middle-age Michael Cain. Sadly, its moment has passed, as the socio-political surroundings that made this novel possible are now alien to most.
Mbon Mbon
Not up to snuff for Burgess. Dated now, and not in an interesting, retro fashion.
Thetath Thetath
Burgess could make selling cabbage; sound entertaining.
Kata Kata
Not Burgess's best work. My favorite of his is actually On Going to Bed which is his natural history of beds in art and literature. This one...well...I enjoyed the vocabulary and his scene settings (follows through on poetic images of lost teeth in a number of well crafted passages), his references to Tolstoy and other masters of Russian lit., and his dark playfulness. It wasn't intense enough to rival Clockwork Orange and wasn't terse and clearly written enough to rival someone like, say Ian McEwan.
Dianaghma Dianaghma
The very prolific Anthony Burgess published a dozen novels between 1956 and 1963, two of them under a pseudonym (Joseph Kell). While 1962 was his year for dystopias with The Wanting Seed and A Clockwork Orange, 1963 would see Burgess in a more comic mood with the relatively more lighthearted Inside Mr. Enderby (published under the Kell Pseudonym) and Honey for the Bears, though both also have darker undertones.

Enderby, which produced three sequels over the years, is about an eccentric poet who winds up in an unwanted relationship with a magazine editor and is amusing in its own way though I wouldn't put it anywhere near the top of my Burgess reading list. Honey for the Bears is a bit better if only because it offers a rather interesting view of life behind the Iron Curtain, as most of it takes place in Leningrad (St. Petersburg today). The very realistic details and incidents are drawn from a voyage Burgess had made to that city a few years earlier, a trip that also provided fodder for the Slavic/English polyglot language of Clockwork Orange.

The story concerns Paul Hussey, owner of a small antiques business in England, who with his American-born wife travels to Leningrad to sell some dresses on the black market as a favor to the widow of a good friend (and sometime lover). This is highly illegal and Hussey ends up in a series of adventures and absurdist scrapes as he tries to effect his plans, all while dealing with the hospitalization of his wife with some sort of allergic skin rash.

The outsider's view of the Soviet's increasingly slapstick police state alone makes this book worth reading. Burgess does have an annoying habit of firing off ten-dollar words just to show off his vocabulary, but that is a trifling criticism. An excellent, if obscure, work from one of the masters of post WWII English Literature.
Andronrad Andronrad
It is by chance that I read this book. And I don't regret it. I loved Burgess's A Clockwork Orange, and, naturally, I wanted to read more. After looking over the reviews of The Doctor is Sick ,The Complete Mr. Enderby, and The Wanting Seed, I decided I'd look for one of those. I went to the local bookstore, and sadly (or so I thought at the time) they only had one copy of Honey for the Bears, about 7 copies of A Clockwork Orange and a couple of works he did on Shakespeare. I read the summary for Honey for the Bears, and I was uninterested. However, for lack of reading material, I bought it.
It was excellent. Burgess is really talented. Unlike so many other books, this one never gets boring, not even for a second. Taking a journey of self exploration with Paul could not possibly be more entertaining, funny, exciting or meaningful than Burgess makes it. You'll enjoy this book if you like a well constructed plot and interesting story line. This was not in any way Russian babble not worth reading unless Russian yourself. (I'm not Russian, never have been to Russia, and don't know any of the Russian language. I will go even furthur to say that you most certainly don't have to have a great interest in Russia to enjoy this book!) At the risk of sounding cliche, this is just one of those books that entertains you the whole way through.
It's not complete candy though: Burgess used Russian throughout this book, making it a little diffult to understand at times. I had to reread a few parts, but it wasn't a chore at all, and surprisingly, did not bother me. Everything comes together at the end, although is not always what you expect. Delightful. I'm surprised this wasn't made into a movie.