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eBook Playing the Canterbury Tales: The Continuations and Additions ePub

eBook Playing the Canterbury Tales: The Continuations and Additions ePub

by Andrew Higl

  • ISBN: 1409427285
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Andrew Higl
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Routledge; 1 edition (January 28, 2012)
  • Pages: 216
  • ePub book: 1301 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1695 kb
  • Other: mbr lit txt mobi
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 564

Description

Using examples and theories from new media studies, Higl demonstrates that the Tales are best viewed as an 'interactive fiction.

Using examples and theories from new media studies, Higl demonstrates that the Tales are best viewed as an 'interactive fiction. Readers participated in the on-going creation and production of the tales by adding new text, rearranging existing text, and through this textual transmission, introduced new social and literary meaning to the work. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Playing the Canterbury Tales book . Playing the Canterbury Tales: The Continuations and Additions.

Andrew Higl makes a case for understanding the additions and changes to Chaucer's original open and fragmented work by thinking of them as distinct interactive moves in a game similar to the storytelling game the pilgrims play. Using examples and theories from new media studies, Higl demonstrates that the Tales are best viewed as an "interactive fiction," reshaped by active readers.

Playing the Canterbury Tales addresses the additions, continuations . The Canterbury Tales are a more dynamic and unstable literary work than.

Playing the Canterbury Tales: The Continuations and Additions. Burlington, VT: Ashgate Publishing Company, 2012.

I was constantly educated by the insightfulness and theoretical audacity of chapters

This is a smart book and deserves a wide readership among scholars and teachers of Chaucer.

Playing the Canterbury Tales addresses the additions, continuations, and reordering of the Canterbury Tales found in the manuscripts and early printed editions of the Tales. Many modern editions present a specific set of tales in a specific order, and often leave out an entire corpus of continuations and additions. Andrew Higl makes a case for understanding the additions and changes to Chaucer's original open and fragmented work by thinking of them as distinct interactive moves in a game similar to the storytelling game the pilgrims play. Using examples and theories from new media studies, Higl demonstrates that the Tales are best viewed as an "interactive fiction," reshaped by active readers. Readers participated in the ongoing creation and production of the tales by adding new text and rearranging existing text, and through this textual transmission, they introduced new social and literary meaning to the work. This theoretical model and the boundaries between the canonical and apocryphal texts are explored in six case studies: the spurious prologues of the Wife of Bath's Tale, John Lydgate's influence on the Tales, the Northumberland manuscript, the ploughman character, and the Cook's Tale. The Canterbury Tales are a more dynamic and unstable literary work than usually encountered in a modern critical edition.