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eBook remembered rapture: the writer at work ePub

eBook remembered rapture: the writer at work ePub

by bell hooks

  • ISBN: 0805059091
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: bell hooks
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Henry Holt and Co.; 1st edition (January 11, 1999)
  • Pages: 256
  • ePub book: 1676 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1147 kb
  • Other: lrf docx mobi txt
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 508

Description

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remembered rapture book.

remembered rapture: the writer at work. Drawing on her experiences as a professor of English and the author of sixteen highly acclaimed books, critic bell hooks presents an insightful collection of essays on the process and politics of writing. Centrally, many of the essays raise provocative questions about the feminist movement and women's writing-the kinds of voices women have established in the wake of the demand for more writing by women, the politics of confession and the type of standards being set for women writers by critics. In these impassioned essays, prolific writer hooks offers the process and politics of writing with her examinaton of memoir, autobiography, diary writing, and poetry. At the outset she takes issue.

Information about the book, remembered rapture: the writer at work: the Nonfiction, Paperback . Book Description: With grace and insight, celebrated writer bell hooks untangles the complex personae of women writers.

Information about the book, remembered rapture: the writer at work: the Nonfiction, Paperback, by bell hooks (Holt Paperbacks, Nov 15, 1999). Born and raised in the rural South, hooks learned early the power of the written word and the importance of speaking her mind. Her passion for words is the heartbeat of this collection of essays. Remembered Rapture celebrates literacy, the joys of reading and writing, and the lasting power of the book.

Drawing on her experiences as a professor of English and the author of sixteen highly acclaimed books, critic bell hooks presents an insightful collection of essays on the process and politics of writing

Drawing on her experiences as a professor of English and the author of sixteen highly acclaimed books, critic bell hooks presents an insightful collection of essays on the process and politics of writing

by hooks & bell & Hooks & Bell.

by hooks & bell & Hooks & Bell. In the end only three things matter: how much you loved, how gently you lived, and how gracefully you let go of things not meant for you. ― Anonymous. 100 weight loss tips. 32 Pages·2008·173 KB·82,142 Downloads.

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Bell Hooks Biography. Born: September 25, 1952 Hopkinsville, Kentucky African American activist, educator, and writer. Remembered Rapture: The Writer at Work. New York: Henry Holt, 1999. Writer, professor, and social critic, bell hooks is undeniably one of the most successful "cross-over" academics of the late twentieth century. Her books look at the function of race and gender in today's culture. Born Gloria Jean Watkins on September 25, 1952, bell hooks was raised in Hopkinsville, Kentucky, a small, segregated (separated by race) town in rural Kentucky.

Drawing on her experiences as a professor of English and the author of sixteen highly acclaimed books, critic bell hooks presents an insightful collection of essays on the process and politics of writing. Centrally, many of the essays raise provocative questions about the feminist movement and women's writing--the kinds of voices women have established in the wake of the demand for more writing by women, the politics of confession and the type of standards being set for women writers by critics. Several essays explore hooks's personal relationship to publishing, explaining the impact success has had on her work as she highlights her movement from writing in relative isolation to writing in New York City amidst the publishing industry, in a world full of writers. Other essays focus on the dearth of nonfiction writing by Black women, contrasting that with the rise in their published fiction. More general essays focus on writing as healing, raising issues about the function of writing; the extent to which readers inspire writers; and how race, ger, and class can determine one's relationship to words. Remembered Rapture offers a fresh and lively discussion of living with words.

Comments

Daigami Daigami
loved this book, it helped me to understand a lot this is needed reading for fresh writers
MEGA FREEDY MEGA FREEDY
bell hooks (all lower-case letters; born Gloria Jean Watkins in 1952) is an American author, feminist, and social activist. She has written many books, such as Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism,Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center,Outlaw Culture: Resisting Representations,Killing Rage: Ending Racism, and many more. [NOTE: page numbers below refer to the 237-page hardcover edition.]

She wrote in the Preface to this 1999 book, “Writing these essays about writing has intensified my understanding and appreciation of the writer at work. This work was written to share the dimensions of my writing life that take place behind the scenes. Written from the standpoint of cultural critic, literary scholar, and/or creative writer, these essays probe and examine. They interrogate. Some are academic in tone, others are polemical or playful or just plain celebratory. They span a period of twenty years. Significantly, issues that were relevant and key when I first began writing are still central… many of the essays in this collection emerged as responses to readers who wanted to know more about how the work came to be what it is and other less gentle interrogators who found my engagement with writing suspect.” (Pg. xi)

She continues, “In many of these essays I grapple with the issue ow public work as an intellectual in and outside and academy and that space of writing that is always intimate, private, solitary… As a still emergent group of writers… black women grapple continually with the suspicions of a larger literary world that is still not confident we are serious thinkers and writers… I address these issues in ‘Remembered Rapture’ because the marketplace has discovered our words are a useful commodity and eagerly seeks to push our work only in the direction of profit and gain.” (Pg. xii-xiii)

In one essay, she notes, ”[Zora Neale] Hurston’s first biographer was white and male. When his book was published, he openly admitted that he felt there were blind spots in his perspective and stated that he looked forward to the progressive interpretive visions of women scholars, particularly black women, could bring to Hurston’s life and work. Such work has yet to appear.” (Pg. 25-26)

She explains, “Often the suggestion that I am writing ‘too much’ comes from black women wo have either written very little or not as much as they want to write. Fortunately I have never had to write to make a living. As a consequence I have always only written on subjects that intrigue and fascinate me… The continued success of the writing, the accolades it brings as well as the financial rewards seem to be most disturbing to the critical observers…” (Pg. 29-30)

In her ‘Dancing with Words’ essay, she shares, “I am still transported, carried away by writing and reading. Writing longhand the first drafts of all my work, I read aloud to myself. Performing the words to both hear and feel them, I want to be certain I am grappling with language in a manner where my words live and breathe…” (Pg. 36) She adds, “In my own imagination, this process of thinking and writing is affirmed by the Buddhist vision of interior arrangement, where one strives to create a particular atmosphere with aesthetic minimalism, with an eye for simplicity.” (Pg. 40)

She recalls, “In the all-black schools of my childhood there had never been any doubt that we have equal access to the world of the imaginary… No one had ever suggested that being black, female, or working-class would stand in my way. No wonder then that I cherish the memory of those all-black schools where no one ever thought my love of Dickinson and Wordsworth was strange, where no one ever questioned my right to love great literature no matter who had written it.” (Pg. 48) Later, she adds, “there is no black literature, only literature that conveys our experience as black people. There is no feminist writer, only the writer who writes from a feminist perspective.” (Pg. 56-57)

She reveals, “As a young adult able to be critical of Christianity, I searched for a spiritual path that would offer an alternative to the fall/redemption model. That search led me to teachings and to spiritual leaders and guides who taught me about other paths. I learned about the mystical dimensions of Islam, studied about Buddhism, Hinduism, and other religious traditions. My current spiritual practice grows out of a combination of various traditions. Drawn to the teachings of Buddha, I practice yoga and meditation. That aspect of Christian faith I most cling to is the emphasis on prayer. And from the teachings of Sufi mystics, I learned how to understand Love as divine energy in the universe.” (Pg. 111-112)

Later in this essay, she explains, “When I first published a chapbook of poems… I had chosen to use as a pseudonym my great-grandmothers name, Bell Hooks. Though there were many reasons for choosing and keeping a pen name, the one I seldom talked about was my religious belief that it was important to deflect away from self and ego.” (Pg. 114)

Often much more intimate and “personal” than most of her other books, this book will be “must reading” for those of us who love hooks’ writings, as well as those who want to read the thoughts of a prominent writer and “public intellectual” on writing, as well as other subjects.
Alsalar Alsalar
bell hooks (all lower-case letters; born Gloria Jean Watkins in 1952) is an American author, feminist, and social activist. She has written many books, such as Ain't I a Woman: Black Women and Feminism,Feminist Theory: From Margin to Center,Outlaw Culture: Resisting Representations,Killing Rage: Ending Racism, and many more. [NOTE: page numbers below refer to the 237-page hardcover edition.]

She wrote in the Preface to this 1999 book, “Writing these essays about writing has intensified my understanding and appreciation of the writer at work. This work was written to share the dimensions of my writing life that take place behind the scenes. Written from the standpoint of cultural critic, literary scholar, and/or creative writer, these essays probe and examine. They interrogate. Some are academic in tone, others are polemical or playful or just plain celebratory. They span a period of twenty years. Significantly, issues that were relevant and key when I first began writing are still central… many of the essays in this collection emerged as responses to readers who wanted to know more about how the work came to be what it is and other less gentle interrogators who found my engagement with writing suspect.” (Pg. xi)

She continues, “In many of these essays I grapple with the issue ow public work as an intellectual in and outside and academy and that space of writing that is always intimate, private, solitary… As a still emergent group of writers… black women grapple continually with the suspicions of a larger literary world that is still not confident we are serious thinkers and writers… I address these issues in ‘Remembered Rapture’ because the marketplace has discovered our words are a useful commodity and eagerly seeks to push our work only in the direction of profit and gain.” (Pg. xii-xiii)

In one essay, she notes, ”[Zora Neale] Hurston’s first biographer was white and male. When his book was published, he openly admitted that he felt there were blind spots in his perspective and stated that he looked forward to the progressive interpretive visions of women scholars, particularly black women, could bring to Hurston’s life and work. Such work has yet to appear.” (Pg. 25-26)

She explains, “Often the suggestion that I am writing ‘too much’ comes from black women wo have either written very little or not as much as they want to write. Fortunately I have never had to write to make a living. As a consequence I have always only written on subjects that intrigue and fascinate me… The continued success of the writing, the accolades it brings as well as the financial rewards seem to be most disturbing to the critical observers…” (Pg. 29-30)

In her ‘Dancing with Words’ essay, she shares, “I am still transported, carried away by writing and reading. Writing longhand the first drafts of all my work, I read aloud to myself. Performing the words to both hear and feel them, I want to be certain I am grappling with language in a manner where my words live and breathe…” (Pg. 36) She adds, “In my own imagination, this process of thinking and writing is affirmed by the Buddhist vision of interior arrangement, where one strives to create a particular atmosphere with aesthetic minimalism, with an eye for simplicity.” (Pg. 40)

She recalls, “In the all-black schools of my childhood there had never been any doubt that we have equal access to the world of the imaginary… No one had ever suggested that being black, female, or working-class would stand in my way. No wonder then that I cherish the memory of those all-black schools where no one ever thought my love of Dickinson and Wordsworth was strange, where no one ever questioned my right to love great literature no matter who had written it.” (Pg. 48) Later, she adds, “there is no black literature, only literature that conveys our experience as black people. There is no feminist writer, only the writer who writes from a feminist perspective.” (Pg. 56-57)

She reveals, “As a young adult able to be critical of Christianity, I searched for a spiritual path that would offer an alternative to the fall/redemption model. That search led me to teachings and to spiritual leaders and guides who taught me about other paths. I learned about the mystical dimensions of Islam, studied about Buddhism, Hinduism, and other religious traditions. My current spiritual practice grows out of a combination of various traditions. Drawn to the teachings of Buddha, I practice yoga and meditation. That aspect of Christian faith I most cling to is the emphasis on prayer. And from the teachings of Sufi mystics, I learned how to understand Love as divine energy in the universe.” (Pg. 111-112)

Later in this essay, she explains, “When I first published a chapbook of poems… I had chosen to use as a pseudonym my great-grandmothers name, Bell Hooks. Though there were many reasons for choosing and keeping a pen name, the one I seldom talked about was my religious belief that it was important to deflect away from self and ego.” (Pg. 114)

Often much more intimate and “personal” than most of her other books, this book will be “must reading” for those of us who love hooks’ writings, as well as those who want to read the thoughts of a prominent writer and “public intellectual” on writing, as well as other subjects.