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eBook The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy ePub

eBook The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy ePub

by Kathleen Blake

  • ISBN: 0199563268
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Kathleen Blake
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (January 18, 2010)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1307 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1115 kb
  • Other: doc txt doc rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 336

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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This book offers a fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in their bearing for Victorian literature and culture.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. It treats writings by Jeremy Bentham, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, James and John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Rabindranath Tagore

Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy, Kathleen Blake, Oxford University Press, 2009, 267 pages. Pleasures of Benthamism. This paper applies the career-concerns model of policy-making to a political economy of fiscal federalism and examines the effect of decentralization on policy-makers' effort incentives and its relative efficiency over centralization. In the single-task case, decentralization induces larger effort than centralization owing to the effect of focus and yardstick competition, though it is not.

This book offers a fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in their bearing for Victorian literature and culture.

understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in relation to Victorian literature and culture. Oxford University Press (2009). Similar books and articles.

A fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in relation to Victorian literature and culture. A fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in relation to Victorian literature and culture. Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy, Kathleen Blake, Oxford University Press, 2009, 267 Pages.

Kathleen Blake is Professor of English at the University of Washington, author of Play, Games, and Sport: The Literary Works of Lewis Carroll and Love and the Woman Question in Victorian Literature: The Art of Self-Postponement.

Bentham in the Twentieth Century’. In The Evolution of Modern Economic Theory and Other Papers on the History of Economic Thought. Sraffa, P. (E. 1962. The Works and Correspondence of David Ricardo (with the collaboration of . Dobb) Vol. III. Pamphlets and papers, 1809–1811. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press. IX. Letters, July 1821–1823.

Keywords: political economy, Benthamism, Victorian literature, University Press, Kathleen Blake, Oxford University, Pleasures. For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009). CrossRefGoogle Scholar. Complete Writings, ed. by Geoffrey Keynes (London: Oxford University Press, 1969). The Anatomy of Influence: Literature as a Way of Life (New Haven: Yale University Press, 2011).

Utility and Democracy: The Political Thought of Jeremy Bentham, by Philip Schofield The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy, by Kathleen Blake. Utility and Democracy: The Political Thought of Jeremy Bentham, by Philip Schofield The Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy, by Kathleen Blake (pp. 533-536). Dress Culture in Late Victorian Women's Fiction: Literacy, Textiles, and Activism, by Christine Bayles Kortsch Representations of Hair in Victorian Literature and Culture, by Galia Ofek.

The Oxford Handbook of Victorian Literary Culture. Kathleen Blake is Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Washington, author of Play, Games, and Sport: The Literary Works of Lewis Carroll (1974), Love and the Woman Question in Victorian Literature: The Art of Self-Postponement (1983), and Pleasures of Benthamism: Victorian Literature, Utility, Political Economy (2009).

This book offers a fresh look at the often-censured but imperfectly understood traditions of Utilitarianism and political economy in their bearing for Victorian literature and culture. It treats writings by Jeremy Bentham, Adam Smith, Thomas Malthus, David Ricardo, James and John Stuart Mill, Charles Dickens, Thomas Carlyle, Anthony Trollope, George Eliot, Elizabeth Gaskell, and Rabindranath Tagore. It sets texts in historical context, examines style as well as ideas, and aims to widen awareness of commonalities across seemingly divided expressions of the age. A work of 'new economic criticism,' it also treats Utilitarianism, close kin to political economy but even more poorly understood and poorly regarded. No other literary study addresses Bentham so fully. The book further contributes to study of Victorian literature-and-liberalism and Victorian liberalism-and-imperialism. It challenges a high-cultural perspective and a perspective of ideology-critique that derives from F. R. Leavis and Michel Foucault and inform the prevailing idea of Victorian literature: as contender against the repressive mentality of Mr. Gradgrind, Dickens's caricature of a Smith-Benthamite; against the 'carceral' social discipline of Bentham's Panopticon; and against the 'dismal science.' But 'utility' has the happier meaning of pleasure. This study presents a capitalist, liberal age pursuing utility in commerce, industry, and socioeconomic/political reforms; favorable to freedom; and 'leveling' as regards gender and class. What about empire? A question not generally so squarely confronted in works on Victorian literature-and-economics and Victorian literature-and-liberalism. Shown here is the surprising extent to which liberalism develops as liberalism through 'liberal imperialism'.