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eBook Venice: Pure City ePub

eBook Venice: Pure City ePub

by Peter Ackroyd

  • ISBN: 0307473791
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Peter Ackroyd
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Anchor; Reprint edition (October 25, 2011)
  • Pages: 432
  • ePub book: 1483 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1420 kb
  • Other: txt lit mbr rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 285

Description

Ackroyd’s Venice: Pure City is a study of Venice much in the vein of his lauded London: The Biography.

Ackroyd’s Venice: Pure City is a study of Venice much in the vein of his lauded London: The Biography. Like London, Venice is a fluid, writerly exploration organized around a number of themes. History and context are provided in each chapter, but Ackroyd’s portrait of Venice is a particularly novelistic one, both beautiful and rapturous. We could have no better guide-reading Venice: Pure City is, in itself, a glorious journey to the ultimate city.

And so Peter Ackroyd invites us through his book and his TV series-reproduced in DVD format to be watched in the comfort of your sitting room- to this VeneziaRama.

And so Peter Ackroyd invites us through his book and his TV series-reproduced in DVD format to be watched in the comfort of your sitting room- to this VeneziaRama. For we are not to feel self-conscious as visitors twice removed. We are to imagine ourselves as tourists, or even pilgrims traveling in adoration of extravaganzas.

Ackroyd Peter Venice: Pure City - читать книгу онлайн бесплатно. II The City of Saint Mark. 10. 4 The Saint Comes.

I liked Peter Ackroyd's "Venice: Pure City. The book is big, about 6 1/2 by 9 1/2, with just over 400 pages, so getting through it in detail, which is worth it, can take a while. One thing immediately noticeable is the jacket, or half-jacket, that covers only the bottom 6 inches of the cover. Grotesque is a better word. I won't tell you what is depicted, which for all I know may come only with the hardcopy (the hardcopy would be my recommendation). But the pretty jacket concealing something that is not pretty, fits in with Ackroyd's overall revelations about Venice throughout the book. Ackroyd stresses that Venice has always rested uneasy on the sea and is predominately surface and show.

Читать онлайн Venice: Pure City.

List of Illustrations Section One i. Cristoforo Sabbadino, Map of Venice, . 557. Archivio di stato, Venice/Cameraphoto Arte Venezia/B. Читать онлайн Venice: Pure City.

Author: Peter Ackroyd. With Venice: Pure City, Peter Ackroyd is at his most magical and magisterial, presenting a glittering, evocative, fascinating, story-filled portrait of the ultimate city. How Ackroyd deftly catalogues the overabundance of the city’s real and literary tropes and touchstones is itself a kind of tribute to La Serenissima, as Venice is called, and his seductive voice is elegant and elegiac.

Venice : pure city, Peter Ackroyd. 1st ed. in the United States of America. The free online library containing 500000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device. p. cm. Originally published in Great Britain by Chatto & Windus, London, in 2009 -T. 1. Venice (Italy)-History. 2. Venice (Italy)-Social conditions. 3. Venice (Italy)-Social life and customs.

Venice: Pure Cityis a grand biography of a subject that is as complicated and labyrinthine as Venice’s tiny alleyways. It is impossible not to get lost there, and that is why Ackroyd may have been the best person to write such an insightful boo. .He approaches Venice the way a scholar would a historical figure, because that’s what Venice is. Yet he isn’t locked into a timeline: He enjoys pushing the tides of history back and forth. It’s an engaging technique. - Newark Star-Ledger Thoughtful, thorough and insightful, is at least as much interpreter as historian.

In this magnificent vision of Venice, Peter Ackroyd turns his unparalleled skill at evoking place from London and the River Thames, to Italy and the city of myth, mystery and beauty. He leads us through the history of the city, from the first refugees arriving in the mists of the lagoon in the fourth century to the rise of a great mercantile state and a trading empire, the wars against Napoleon and the tourist invasions of today. In this magnificent vision of Venice, Peter Ackroyd turns his unparalleled skill at evoking place from London and the River Thames, to Italy and the city of myth, mystery and beauty.

Peter Ackroyd at his most magical and magisterial-a glittering, evocative, fascinating, story-filled portrait of Venice, the ultimate city. Peter Ackroyd at his most magical and magisterial-a glittering, evocative, fascinating, story-filled portrait of Venice, the ultimate city.

Peter Ackroyd at his most magical and magisterial—a glittering, evocative, fascinating, story-filled portrait of Venice, the ultimate city. The Venetians’ language and way of thinking set them aside from the rest of Italy. They are an island people, linked to the sea and to the tides rather than the land. This lat­est work from the incomparable Peter Ackroyd, like a magic gondola, transports its readers to that sensual and surprising city. His account embraces facts and romance, conjuring up the atmosphere of the canals, bridges, and sunlit squares, the churches and the markets, the festivals and the flowers. He leads us through the history of the city, from the first refugees arriving in the mists of the lagoon in the fourth century to the rise of a great mercantile state and its trading empire, the wars against Napoleon, and the tourist invasions of today. Everything is here: the merchants on the Rialto and the Jews in the ghetto; the glassblowers of Murano; the carnival masks and the sad colonies of lepers; the artists—Bellini, Titian, Tintoretto, Tiepolo. And the ever-present undertone of Venice’s shadowy corners and dead ends, of prisons and punishment, wars and sieges, scandals and seductions. Ackroyd’s Venice: Pure City is a study of Venice much in the vein of his lauded London: The Biography. Like London, Venice is a fluid, writerly exploration organized around a num­ber of themes. History and context are provided in each chap­ter, but Ackroyd’s portrait of Venice is a particularly novelistic one, both beautiful and rapturous. We could have no better guide—reading Venice: Pure City is, in itself, a glorious journey to the ultimate city.From the Hardcover edition.

Comments

bass bass
I liked Peter Ackroyd's "Venice: Pure City." The book is big, about 6 1/2 by 9 1/2, with just over 400 pages, so getting through it in detail, which is worth it, can take a while.

One thing immediately noticeable is the jacket, or half-jacket, that covers only the bottom 6 inches of the cover.

The half-jacket bears the name of the book and a standard view of St. Mark's Square with the Doge's Palace, and in front of it, several gondolas in the Grand Canal.

The upper part of the cover and the half-jacket reveal what almost all travelers have noted, that Venice is very beautiful.

What is hiding behind Peter Ackroyd's half-jacket is the lower part of the cover, which I daresay cannot be called beautiful. Grotesque is a better word. I won't tell you what is depicted, which for all I know may come only with the hardcopy (the hardcopy would be my recommendation). But the pretty jacket concealing something that is not pretty, fits in with Ackroyd's overall revelations about Venice throughout the book.

Ackroyd stresses that Venice has always rested uneasy on the sea and is predominately surface and show. The façades of houses are covered with attractive sheets of varied colors of marble. Hence the beauty. Behind the façades, the construction material is brick, not blocks of marble. The houses rest on 10 or 12-foot wooden poles sunk down into the mud to reach a firm foundation of harder clay and dense sand. These pilings can last a thousand years if they remain submerged. Returned to air they would crumble.

The sea continuously seeks to reclaim Venice's 35-mile by 6-mile stretch of 117 islands. The city has always been in danger of disappearing into the sea. Yet the sea and the city's industry have been their life of far-flung trade. Ackroyd traces its history from early beginnings to a once great warring empire to its present position of attracting and depending upon worldwide tourism.

Ackroyd's enormous research is greatly evident. His writing is masterly. He is an excellent guide through Venice's life, religion, government, trade, industry, history, and myth. Venice is thoroughly fascinating.
Conjulhala Conjulhala
One of Ackroyd's best. A delightful (and sometimes awful - see the chapter on the first Ghetto) historical survey of a marvellous city, filled with anecdotes and interesting facts, in the author's usual excellent style. I can't think why more people haven't five starred this extremely diverting book.
Kakashkaliandiia Kakashkaliandiia
Having been a visitor to Venice more than a dozen times, cannot wait to to return with an heighten sense of awe, mystery, love and trepidation - thanks to the captivating writing found in this tome, which is perfect island reading.
Kecq Kecq
A thoroughly engagingand informative book for anyone going to visit Venice. It was
hard to put down.
Wel Wel
Read it before a recent trip; super prep for visiting Venice.
Mildorah Mildorah
This book is indispensable for anyone who wishes to know more about the history, the people and the culture of Venice. It is thoroughly researched and beautifully written. I am getting ready for my second trip to Venice and I am very glad I had the chance to prepare some of my visits with the detailed historical analysis of this book. I strongly recommend to anyone who enjoys traveling and good literature.
Sharpmane Sharpmane
Sent this off to a fellow Venice friend and she loved it.
Can't wait to return to Venice this May...after reading my new book
ONE OF THE LAST BOOKS ON VENICE VERY WELL WRITTEN THAT GIVES A GOOD IDEA OF A REPUBLIC THAT LASTED 2000 YEARS I I I I REALLY ENJOY IT .