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eBook Making an Elephant: Writing from Within (Vintage International) ePub

eBook Making an Elephant: Writing from Within (Vintage International) ePub

by Graham Swift

  • ISBN: 0307455750
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Graham Swift
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1 edition (May 4, 2010)
  • Pages: 416
  • ePub book: 1538 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1335 kb
  • Other: azw lrf lrf mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 726

Description

In Making an Elephant, Swift rewardingly places himself at the centre of a book. The Sunday Times (London) Valuable. You come away from these pieces feeling that is a very good person to have as a friend: fond, understanding, fun, but above all discreet, a man you can trust.

In Making an Elephant, Swift rewardingly places himself at the centre of a book. The Washington Times Swift is at his most movingly revelatory when discussing his work. Sunday Telegraph (London) A pleasure to read, from first word to last, Making an Elephant is sure to move writers and readers alike to join the legions of Graham Swift fans.

There are private moments with Swift's father and with his own younger self, as well as musings-on history, memory, and imagination-that.

Swift, Graham, 1949-, Authors, English - 20th century - Biography, Authors, English, Écrivains anglais - 20e siècle - Biographies, Ecrivains anglais - 20e siecle - Biographies. Toronto : Random House Canada.

Not so for Graham Swift; all was serene in south Croydon, where he grew up. His grandparents' house in. .It wouldn't hurt, then, to know Graham Swift better; sadly, the impression left by Making an Elephant is that a proper memoir is just too much effort. His grandparents' house in Sydenham was lofty and faintly sinister, but when the child mounted the steep stairs there was the reward, at the top, of an old-fashioned typewriter with "stiff epaulettes of spokes", with which he was allowed to play. The publisher's jacket copy claims the book "brims with charm and candour". Both terms apply to an elegant little essay on Montaigne and his translator John Florio.

Caryl Phillips: interview with Graham Swift

Caryl Phillips: interview with Graham Swift. This book began as no more than the collection of pieces of occasional non-fiction, published or unpublished, that writers of fiction are sometimes tempted to put together, but in the course of assembling it I’ve tried to thread the pieces in a way that generally offers, to borrow a phrase of Kipling’s, ‘something of myself ’.

Making An Elephant book. In the introduction to this book, Graham Swift states that it started out as simply a collection of non-fiction pieces but that it ended up being somewhat of an autobiography as well

Making An Elephant book. In his first ever work of non-fiction, the Booker Prize-winning. In the introduction to this book, Graham Swift states that it started out as simply a collection of non-fiction pieces but that it ended up being somewhat of an autobiography as well. In my opinion it didn't really succeed on that level at all. I really didn't learn all that much about his life from this book other than he's a writer, has quite a few other writers as friends, and drinks quite a bit.

About Making an Elephant

Part of Vintage International. Part of Vintage International. Category: Biography & Memoir Literary Criticism. About Making an Elephant.

There are private moments with Swift's father and with his own younger self, as well as musings-on history, memory, and imagination-that illuminate his work.

March 1 2009, 12:00am, The Sunday Times. In a culture where authors seem to spend as much time racketing around literary festivals promoting their books as they do sitting at their desks actually writing them, Graham Swift remains quietly elusive.

Making an Elephant : Writing from Within.

In his first-ever work of nonfiction, Graham Swift—Booker Prize-winning author of Waterland and Last Orders—gives us a highly personal book: a singular and open-spirited account of a writer’s life. Here Kazuo Ishiguro advises on how to choose a guitar; Salman Rushdie arrives for Christmas under guard; Caryl Phillips shares a beer with the author at a nightclub in Toronto. There are private moments with Swift’s father and with his own younger self, as well as musings—on history, memory, and imagination—that illuminate his work. As generous in its scope as it is acute in its observations, Making an Elephant brings together a richly varied selection of essays, portraits, poetry and interviews, full of insights into Swift’s passions and motivations, and wise about the friends, family and other writers who have mattered to him over the years.

Comments

Steel_Blade Steel_Blade
In his Introduction Swift says that none of his novels have autobiographical material in them. I can believe that, for the eponymous piece (surprisingly named, since the making of a wooden elephant plays a very small part in it) is an affectionate piece about his late father, whereas in some of his novels the father-son relationship is a very tense one.

But in this collection of 18 pieces (plus 26 of his uncomplicated and mostly very short poems) he does say quite a lot about himself, about episodes of his life, about visits to Greece (in 1967 during the rule of the military Junta and again in 1974 just as the Junta was overthrown) and to Prague in 1989, just as the Velvet Revolution was happening. He talks about films being made of his novels; about his writer friends - he interviews two of them, Kazuo Ishiguro and Caryl Phillips, about their novels, and there are pieces about Salman Rushdie and Ted Hughes (who also, like Swift, loved fishing).

But most of it is about how he personally sees the business of writing novels and short stories. Several times he stresses the essential connection between fiction and the imagination. He is interviewed about his novels by Patrick McGrath and by Barbara Barker. The most interesting insight into how he writes is in the interview by Barbara Barker in the penultimate piece: here we see the enormous role played by his intuition rather than by any planning beforehand: he never knows in advance where his story-telling will take him. It has worked brilliantly for him, but his account cannot be taken as (nor would he claim it to be) a generalized statement of how novels come to be written.

It is all interesting and beautifully written; we are in touch with a very reflective person, deeply into symbolism, and very likeable at that.
Zeleence Zeleence
A great collection of essays, poems, an even interviews o other writers by Graham Swift. Swift is a very lyrical writer, and this book is wonderful to read. However, it is basically a book that will be enjoyed most by writers and would-be writers (that covers about 90% of us!) as well as fans of Swift. A very contenting book.