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eBook The Ant King: and Other Stories ePub

eBook The Ant King: and Other Stories ePub

by Benjamin Rosenbaum

  • ISBN: 1931520534
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Benjamin Rosenbaum
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Small Beer Press (August 9, 2008)
  • Pages: 272
  • ePub book: 1224 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1868 kb
  • Other: lit rtf azw txt
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 124

Description

The Ant King comprises stories that challenge the "willing suspension of disbelief" in ways at once satisfying and . Many of these stories are simply sublime. In this, the first collection of his work, Rosenbaum successfully lilts between genres between and even within stories

The Ant King comprises stories that challenge the "willing suspension of disbelief" in ways at once satisfying and unsettling and (often) amusing. In this, the first collection of his work, Rosenbaum successfully lilts between genres between and even within stories. It's an auspicious start that will leave readers craving whatever is to come.

Rosenbaum's stories support this notion because they allow us brief visits into interesting, often delightful, and ultimately unsustainable realities. The Ant King comprises stories that challenge the "willing suspension of disbelief" in ways at once satisfying and unsettling and (often) amusing.

Read whenever, wherever. Your phone is always with you, so your books are too – even when you’re offline. Bookmate – an app that makes you want to read.

Shortlisted for the Hugo and Nebula awards, Rosenbaum’s work has been reprinted in Harper’s and The Year’s Best Science Fiction. He lives in Switzerland with his family.

Электронная книга "The Ant King: and Other Stories", Benjamin Rosenbaum. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Ant King: and Other Stories" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Upper Rubber Boot Books. com. 04/how to live on.

Geoff Ryman Trade paper/ebook · 9781931520645 · February 2011 Geoff Ryman writes about the other and leaves us dissected in the process. His stories are set in recognizable places-London, Cambodia, tomorrow-and feature men and women caught in recognizable situations (or technologies) and not sure which way to turn. They, we, should obviously choose what’s right.

Rosenbaum proves he’s capable of sustained fantasy with Biographical Notes, a steampunkish alternate history of aerial piracy, and A Siege of Cranes, a fantasy about a battle between a human insurgent and the White Witch that carries decidedly modern undercurrent. .Perhaps none of the tales is odder than Orphans, in which girl-meets-elephant, girl-loses-elephant.

Rosenbaum's The Ant King and Other Stories contains invisible cities and playful deconstructions of the form. In "Biographical Notes to 'A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, With Air-Planes,' by Benjamin Rosenbaum"-yes, his name is part of the title-the author imagines a world whose technologies and philosophies differ wildly from ours.

"Rosenbaum's The Ant King and Other Stories contains invisible cities and playful deconstructions of the form. In "Biographical Notes to 'A Discourse on the Nature of Causality, With Air-Planes,' by Benjamin Rosenbaum"—yes, his name is part of the title—the author imagines a world whose technologies and philosophies differ wildly from ours. The result is a commentary on the state of the art that is itself the state of the art."—Los Angeles Times Favorite Books of 2008

* "Give him some prizes, like, perhaps, "best first collection" for this book."—Booklist (Starred review, Top 10 SF Books of the Year)

"Featuring outlandish and striking imagery throughout—a woman in love with an elephant, an orange that ruled the world—this collection is a surrealistic wonderland."—Publishers Weekly

"Rosenbaum proves he’s capable of sustained fantasy with "Biographical Notes," a steampunkish alternate history of aerial piracy, and "A Siege of Cranes," a fantasy about a battle between a human insurgent and the White Witch that carries decidedly modern undercurrents.... Perhaps none of the tales is odder than "Orphans," in which girl-meets-elephant, girl-loses-elephant."—Kirkus Reviews

"Urbane without being arch, sweet without being maudlin, mysterious without being cryptic."—Cory Doctorow, Boing Boing

"Lively, bizarre, and funny as well as dark, sinister, and sensual."—Boston Phoenix

A dazzling, postmodern debut collection of pulp and surreal fictions: a writer of alternate histories defends his patron’s zeppelin against assassins and pirates; a woman transforms into hundreds of gumballs; an emancipated children’s collective goes house hunting.

Benjamin Rosenbaum’s stories have appeared in Asimov’s Science Fiction and McSweeney’s, been translated into fourteen languages, and listed in The Best American Short Stories 2006. Shortlisted for the Hugo and Nebula awards, Rosenbaum’s work has been reprinted in Harper’s and The Year’s Best Science Fiction. He lives in Switzerland with his family.

Comments

Qutalan Qutalan
"Plausibly fabulous," which is my turn-of-phrase on the author's choice term of his genre "plausible fabulism." These are like a jar of gumdrops (quick reads) of the old-fashioned variety, which had many more quirky flavors it seems than people favor these days. Count it as a plus. Fun stuff.

If you're one of those who judge books or movies by plot (I'm not), then the blurbs here on these pages will suffice. (This author likes to keep his readers twisting in the winds, turn you on your ear and see if you spin, and there's not much else going on here than checking your mental agility) (but that's tale-spinning, right?). Mind tripping.

If you're looking for what it's like, I'd say if you like Borges or Calvino (those shining names) or Millhouse, or even the easy-going, rollicking style of Tom Robbins (without so much the lyrical wordplay), you'll like this. Most were just mindbenders except for "Biographical Notes" which held a hint of the mind working behind the curtain and the existential risks at play. The thing about Rosenbaum, I felt he has a good heart -- he's not just yanking you here and thither like Six Flags thrill rides, he wants you to feel joyful.

With these kinds of stories, a little goes a long way. Just pick up one story at random and read it just to see if your inner gyroscope's working, and feel good. There are a lot of authors doing this kind of thing, most in print by small publishers, but Rosenbaum is one of the more enjoyable ones. (I'd more highly recommend Hannu Rajaniemi, if you're interested, for this and a whole lot more.)
Fenrikree Fenrikree
I've always felt that the short story is the ideal form for speculative fiction, especially of the surrealist or magical-realist type. Rosenbaum's stories support this notion because they allow us brief visits into interesting, often delightful, and ultimately unsustainable realities. *The Ant King* comprises stories that challenge the "willing suspension of disbelief" in ways at once satisfying and unsettling and (often) amusing.

Other reviewers have addressed various individual stories, so I won't do that here; besides, I want to read the collection again before weighing in more specifically (and I'm not a big re-reader). But if you like the John Barth of *Lost in the Funhouse* and the very best of Harlan Ellison (e.g. "'Repent, Harlequin,' Said the Tick Tock Man" and "I Have No Mouth But I Must Scream"), I think you're going to like *The Ant King*.
lucky kitten lucky kitten
Many of these stories are simply sublime. In this, the first collection of his work, Rosenbaum successfully lilts between genres between and even within stories. It's an auspicious start that will leave readers craving whatever is to come.

"Biographical Notes..." is simultaneously a steampunk alternate history, a postmodern romp with comic flourishes, and an action story that pauses occasionally to consider the nature of cause and effect. Joyously, it all works. The story strings together assassins, pirates, Eastern philosophy, and zeppelins while the main character, Benjamin Rosenbaum, creates our own world as a fictional landscape in which to ground his latest plausible fable.

Also impressive are:
"A Siege of Cranes" - a sober, dark fairy tale in which a man seeks vengeance for his family from the mysterious cataclysm that ruined his village. The climax is a bit lacking, but the journey there is fantastic.

"Embracing-the-New" - a science fiction story set on a seemingly pre-industrial alien world. Told through an entirely alien perspective, the story evokes themes of artistic expression, identity, and innocence while involving the reader in the main character's plight.

"Start the Clock" - a science fiction story with cyberpunk overtones set in a future in which aging is optional. The story follows a small cadre of young professionals that are biologically prepubescent. The story succeeds both in its portrayal of aged children and in its overarching theme of tolerance.

The low points of the collection:
"Sense and Sensibility" - It may be my unfamiliarity with the well-known novel, but the humor and absurdity of this postmodern story never hit the mark for me.

"Other Cities" - This sequence of short vignettes that each describe a fictional city occasionally piqued my interest but never reached the standard set by the rest of the collection.

The collection is rounded out by a few other stories and a number of mostly agreeable postmodern interstitials.

Overall, the breadth and quality of the stories is remarkable. The collection is an easy recommendation to any fan of science fiction or postmodern fiction.
Mysterious Wrench Mysterious Wrench
I pretty much uniformly liked these stories. Many for very different reasons. Numerous stories were delightful examinations of the structure of stories and or writing. The flash pieces were fun to read and though provoking. Everything was given a touch of whimsy, from biblical vampires to parasitic hive mind artist/priests.

You can try out a bunch of the stories online (some in good quality audio format), but the Trade Paperback is put together quite nice and I'd highly recommend a purchase.
Tejar Tejar
In my opinion the stories vary a lot in quality.

I felt the title story "The Ant King" was the best, but it went downhill from there - most of the middle of the book felt like filler.

Then I got to the last story "A Siege of Cranes". Wow. One of the best short stories I've ever read.

That one alone made the whole book worthwhile - it's fantastic.