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eBook Designing Women: The Dressing Room In Eighteenth-century English Literature And Culture (THE BUCKNELL STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE AND CULTURE) ePub

eBook Designing Women: The Dressing Room In Eighteenth-century English Literature And Culture (THE BUCKNELL STUDIES IN EIGHTEENTH-CENTURY LITERATURE AND CULTURE) ePub

by Tita Chico

  • ISBN: 0838756050
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Tita Chico
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Bucknell Univ Pr (February 1, 2005)
  • Pages: 302
  • ePub book: 1370 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1285 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf txt lit
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 156

Description

Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metaphor in late-seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature for both progressive . Bucknell University Press, 2005 - 302 pages.

Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metaphor in late-seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature for both progressive and conservative satirists and novelists. These writers use the trope to represent competing notions of women's independence and their objectification indicating that the dressing room occupies a central (if neglected) place in the history of private life, postmodern theories of the closet and the development of literary forms. Dressing rooms, introduced into English domestic architecture during the seventeenth century provided elite women with imprecedented private space at home and in so doing promised them an equally unprecedented autonomy by providing a space for self-fashioning, eroticism and contemplation.

Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metaphor in late-seventeenth- and . The dressing room encapsulates the history of gender roles in the eighteenth century, moving from women of a certain class having the ability to claim greater privilege to the widespread development of a submissive, maternal ideal. Throughout this book, I use the dressing room to think about gender.

As a symbol of both progressive and retrograde versions of femininity, Designing Women establishes the dressing room trope in eighteenth-century literature as redefining the gendered constitution of private spaces.

Series: The Bucknell Studies in Eighteenth-century Literature and Culture. Pages with related products. See and discover other items: colombian culture. Hardcover: 258 pages. ISBN-13: 978-0838756898. Product Dimensions: . x . inches.

Designing Women book. Published February 28th 2005 by Bucknell University Press (first published February 2005). Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metapho Dressing rooms, introduced into English domestic architecture during the seventeenth century provided elite women with imprecedented private space at home and in so doing promised them an equally unprecedented autonomy by providing a space for self-fashioning, eroticism and contemplation.

In eighteenth-century England, the color of skin (for instance, ruddy or pale), physique, gait, and manner and style .

In eighteenth-century England, the color of skin (for instance, ruddy or pale), physique, gait, and manner and style of dress were thought to proclaim one’s social status and occupation: a ruddy-faced, sturdy-legged milkmaid from Devonshire walked, talked, and looked differently from a pale, delicate, society miss from London, or so it was believed. Tita Chico, Designing Women: The Dressing Room in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Culture (Lewisburg: Bucknell University Press, 2005), 82, 83, 8. oogle Scholar. 24. John Milton, Eikonklastes, in John Milton: Complete Poems and Major Prose, ed.

Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metaphor in late-seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature for both progressive . Bucknell University Press, 2005 - 302 sayfa.

In eighteenth-century England, the color of skin (for instance, ruddy or pale), physique, gait, and manner and style of dress were . Designing Women: The Dressing Room in Eighteenth-Century English Literature and Culture. Complete Poems and Major Prose.

the dressing room trope in eighteenth-century literature as redefining . eighteenth-century novelist never stops looking.

eighteenth-century novelist never stops looking.

Dressing rooms, introduced into English domestic architecture during the seventeenth century provided elite women with imprecedented private space at home and in so doing promised them an equally unprecedented autonomy by providing a space for self-fashioning, eroticism and contemplation. Tita Chico's Designing Women argues that the dressing room becomes a powerful metaphor in late-seventeenth- and eighteenth-century literature for both progressive and conservative satirists and novelists. These writers use the trope to represent competing notions of women?s independence and their objectification indicating that the dressing room occupies a central (if neglected) place in the history of private life, postmodern theories of the closet and the development of literary forms.

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