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eBook The Prime Minister (The Palliser Novels) ePub

eBook The Prime Minister (The Palliser Novels) ePub

by Jennifer Uglow,Hector Whistler,John McCormick,Anthony Trollope

  • ISBN: 0195208994
  • Category: History and Criticism
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jennifer Uglow,Hector Whistler,John McCormick,Anthony Trollope
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1st edition (May 30, 1991)
  • Pages: 864
  • ePub book: 1944 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1829 kb
  • Other: doc azw lit lrf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 113

Description

Palliser is a reluctant Prime Minister. This is vo. of the Palliser series of novels by Anthony Trollope. It shows, in a very entertaining fashion, how the upper part of Upstairs, Downstairs lived

Palliser is a reluctant Prime Minister. His chief passion is his championing of a decimal system of British money (that would not be adopted until the early 1970s). He is socially awkward and prefers governing to politics. It shows, in a very entertaining fashion, how the upper part of Upstairs, Downstairs lived. It shows what the poliical class of Great Britain felt about their world and the duties they had.

The Palliser novels are six novels by Anthony Trollope. They were more commonly known (before the BBC aired a television adaptation) as the Parliamentary Novels. The common threads throughout the series are the wealthy aristocrat and politician Plantagenet Palliser, and his wife, Lady Glencora. The plots involve British and Irish politics in varying degrees, specifically in and around Parliament.

LibriVox recording of The Prime Minister, by Anthony Trollope. The Prime Minister is the fifth in Trollope's series of six Palliser novels. With Phineas' difficulties resolved, Trollope introduces new characters. A respectable young girl forsakes the man her family had always intended her to marry when she falls in love with a man of foreign extraction and an unknown family. He has a gentleman's education and manners, but his family background and financial means are mysterious.

Trollope penned 47 novels in his career, in addition to various short stories, travel books and biographies. A newfound interest in politics led to the publication of "The Prime Minister" in 1876, one of a group of novels sometimes called Trollope's parliamentary novels. This novel tells of the successes, troubles, and eventual failure of what the author calls the completed picture of a statesman, who should have "rank, and intellect, and parliamentary habits, by which to bind him to the service of his country.

The Prime Minister book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Prime Minister (Palliser, as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

One records the clash between the Duke of Omnium, now prime minister of a coalition government, and his high-spirited wife, Lady Glencora, whose drive to become the . Palliser novels, series of novels by Anthony Trollope.

One records the clash between the Duke of Omnium, now prime minister of a coalition government, and his high-spirited wife, Lady Glencora, whose drive to become the most brilliant hostess in society causes embarrassment for her husband and eventually contributes to his downfall. The second plot relates the machinations of Ferdinand Lopez, an ambitious social climber who wins the support of Lady Glencora-but not her husband-for an election campaign. They are united by their concern with political and social issues and by the character Plantagenet Palliser, who appears in each, with other characters recurring periodically.

The Prime Minister is a novel by Anthony Trollope, first published in 1876. It is the fifth of the "Palliser" series of novels

The Prime Minister is a novel by Anthony Trollope, first published in 1876. It is the fifth of the "Palliser" series of novels.

This book is intended for wide general and gift market; the legion of Trollope fans; students of English .

This book is intended for wide general and gift market; the legion of Trollope fans; students of English literature at all levels wanting to read Trollope in hardback. I didn’t mean to read ‘The Prime Minister’ quite so soon, or to rush through it quite so quickly, but I had to step back into Trollope’s world because there seemed to be so many old friends I wanted. Пользовательский отзыв - antiquary - LibraryThing. Again, I bought this to have a more portable copy of the book.

The books of the Palliser series are: Can You Forgive Her?Phineas Finn, The Eustace Diamonds, Phineas Redux, The Prime Minister, and The Duke's Children. The Prime Minister - Anthony Trollope.

After being installed as Prime Minister in Victorian England, Plantagenet Palliser finds himself uniquely ill-suited for the office

Comments

Yla Yla
There are two plots here. The fortunes of Plantagent Palliser as he becomes The Prime Minister of a coalition government and the misfortunes Emily Wharton who ignores the misgivings of those around her and marries Ferdinand Lopez.
Mr. Palliser is a reluctant Prime Minister. His chief passion is his championing of a decimal system of British money (that would not be adopted until the early 1970s). He is socially awkward and prefers governing to politics. His wife (Lady Glencora) knows the value of social accessibility and connections but the prime minister finds her efforts in this regard "vulgar."
In the secondary plot, Emily Wharton marries Ferdinand Lopez and almost immediately regrets it. Her husband is a speculator and ruins not only himself but his working class partner who becomes an alcoholic. Emily is largely socially isolated. Her closest friend is her father who tries to take some of the sting out of his daughter's marriage by having Emily and Mr.Lopez live with him.
She does meet Sexty Parker, her husband's business partner and his wife. Though Mrs. Parker is clearly not of Emily's class, she is shrewder because she has to be. She is appalled and scornful when she realizes
that Emily has no idea what her husband does and how dangerous it is. She comes to Emily when her husband is truly ruined (after Ferdinand forges Mr. Parker's signature on a bill). Mrs. Parker talks in plain terms. If she does not get money soon her children will starve and be homeless because her husband is no longer sober long enough to make business deals
Lady Glencora provides a bridge between the two plots as she advises her husband and tries to get him to back Ferdinand Lopez for a vacant seat in Parliament. The results are disastrous but also allow Trollope to make fun of The British press. We once again meet Quintus Slide, the "crusading " editor of "The People's Banner."
I've left out numerous plot twists and details. Suffice it to say "The Prime Minister "is worth a reading.
Bolv Bolv
Before politicians are admitted to new offices, few of them would not announce that they want to clean the stables. In practice, things go differently. We see this all the time.

Why do I read Trollope? Simply because he is there; or rather, more specifically, I found the Penguin edition of the `Prime Minister' in the `still to be read' section of my shelf. I took it on a trip. It is an amusing way to spend time. Who reads Trollope? People with lots of time, I would guess. People who are not in a rush, who enjoy the chuckle and the insight, and who find the mysteries of the English caste system and legal structure worth a few or more hours. And those who think that British politics are hilarious.

`It is easy for most of us to stay away from stealing and picking, as long as the clear consequence is prison diet and garments. But when silks and satins come of it, the net result of honesty does not seem so secure.' Right, isn't it?

Of course, this book is not about Gordon Brown; it is about Plantagenet Palliser of the Palliser clan, aka the Duke of Omnium, and of the novel series about the Pallisers. The Duke has made it to the position of prime minister, but not all aristocrats look at this achievement with much respect. It is more like a disturbance in a life. This is the 5th of 6 volumes, and I have no idea why I bought it, back in the 90s. Shouldn't I have started with number 1 of the series? It seems that is not strictly necessary for enjoyment. (The product page here says that this is the best of the six.)

Trollope was a masterful observer of people from certain social strata. His knowledge did not, it seems, encompass the whole width of society, but stayed with `society'. That doesn't make him a snob; it just makes him honestly incomplete. Who can claim to be otherwise, honestly?
`When one man is a peer and another a ploughman, one doesn't find fault with the ploughman, but one also doesn't invite him to dinner.'

If I have to find a fault with Trollope, it is his explicitness. He explains everything to us. That makes things easier, but also takes away the freedom of interpretation. It makes the book comfortable but one-dimensional. No space for post-modernist disagreements.
On the positive side: he uses no coincidences, whether tragic or lucky. His plot relies on psychology and life experience. Trollope is possibly the least romantic of all Victorians. (Admittedly my basis for generalization is not broad.)

The plot has a love story and a political story, interwoven: we start with a young would-be parvenu of questionable ancestry who tries to marry the daughter of a proper gentleman. Since the young man's father was Portuguese instead of English, and since the young man works for a living (in the City, how unrespectable!), he is easily dismissible (isn't it likely that he is Jewish on top of it?). This father wants to see his daughter married into a proper family.
Trollope takes care to make us agree. The young man is not to be trusted. Luckily the daughter is a proper Victorian lady without vulgar notions. She will obey, but then again, she is actually positively inclined...
Clearly, the first reactions are just the initial salvos in a protracted battle.

The political side of the plot focuses on the Duke and his wife, a latter day Lady Macbeth, the schemer with grand ambitions. He is a man of principles and patriotism. He is up against the corroding influences of professional politics. He doesn't feel adequate for the PM job. We follow him through his small political wars and somehow I started remembering that contemporary events are not all that different...
It is amazing how little about actual political issues is needed to tell a good story about political mechanisms. Sure, parties are named, but what are they arguing about? Irrelevant, it seems.
The only subject that seems to play a major part is that of home rule for Ireland, but also not in the sense of analyzing the problems, rather to parade the various commonplaces of the time in front of us.

I have not regretted picking this big thing (700 pages!) from my shelf. I think I will go for more of the series, they are good for travel luggage, as they are compact and one can spend some time with them, ie no need to pack half a library.