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eBook Eye for an Eye (Doughty Library) ePub

eBook Eye for an Eye (Doughty Library) ePub

by Anthony Trollope

  • ISBN: 0218514689
  • Category: Literary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Anthony Trollope
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Blond; New edition edition (April 1967)
  • Pages: 201
  • ePub book: 1540 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1422 kb
  • Other: mbr mobi doc txt
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 890

Description

Start by marking Eye For An Eye (Doughty Library) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Start by marking Eye For An Eye (Doughty Library) as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. Eye For An Eye. by Anthony Trollope.

An Eye for an Eye. Read. One fee. Stacks of books. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

LibriVox recording of An Eye for an Eye by Anthony Trollope

LibriVox recording of An Eye for an Eye by Anthony Trollope. For more free audio books or to become a volunteer reader, visit LibriVox.

And EYE FOR AN EYE is a banner example of how well this works. And Trollope is never better than in the final act of the book as we get into the head of our protagonist trying to justify his brutish behavior. At roughly 200 pages, the book is easily digested in one weekend. The story tells of a young man named Fred Neville who suddenly comes under the line of succession for an Earldom over a large estate. In particular the way he shifts blame for his OWN actions to perceived injustices carried out by the young girl's mother. A fallen man will point the blame at everyone but himself when it comes time to pay the piper, and nowhere have I seen this described better by Trollope.

Chapter XII. Conclusion. The O'Conors of Castle Conor, County Mayo From "Tales from All Countries". John Bull on the Guadalquivir From "Tales from All Countries". The Macdermots of Ballycloran.

Trollope, Anthony, 1815-1882. Subject: Man-woman relationships - Fiction. Subject: Mothers and daughters - Fiction. Subject: Revenge - Fiction.

Publication in the form of a two volume novel was timed to coincide with the issue of the final serialized episodes in January 1879

Not a book had been added to it since the commencement of the century, and it may almost be said that no book had been drawn from its shelves for real use during the same period. There was a suite of rooms - a salon with two withdrawing rooms which now were never opened

Comments

Aria Aria
Over the span of his 40+ novels, Trollope understandably circled many of the same topics. The plot point of a character torn between two different paths of marriage, torn between duty and love, is among the most oft repeated. It is a testament to his skill as a writer that the majority of these stories still feel unique and fresh and are always readable. The reason it continues to work is because he was a master of writing entertaining dialogue and developing character.

As I continue through his extensive library of works, I'm finding that I like his shorter fiction better and better. I like the more focused narrative without the distraction of B and C stories. I like to stay on course and follow a single character and situation all the way through. And EYE FOR AN EYE is a banner example of how well this works.

At roughly 200 pages, the book is easily digested in one weekend. The story tells of a young man named Fred Neville who suddenly comes under the line of succession for an Earldom over a large estate. The original heir having disgraced the family and then dying, this nephew to the aging Earl is told that it is his duty to do what is best for the family and come settle down with a suitable wife. However, this young man is not quite ready to give up all vestiges of youth, and decides he must first finish out his final year in military service.

However, while doing so in the "wild" land of Ireland, he predictably falls for a young lass named Kate O'Hara. Neville would marry her, but her parentage and Catholic religion make it impossible for her to become the countess of an English estate. Even so, Neville relishes this secret "adventure," as he calls it, and ultimately pledges his love and intentions to marry Kate, despite the wishes of his dying Uncle.

As the book progresses, we see the tragic results of Fred's unwillingness to take on responsibility, instead pursuing his wild interests. While tame by today's standards, the novella tackles sexual issues in a way that was no doubt very shocking in its day. And Trollope is never better than in the final act of the book as we get into the head of our protagonist trying to justify his brutish behavior. In particular the way he shifts blame for his OWN actions to perceived injustices carried out by the young girl's mother. A fallen man will point the blame at everyone but himself when it comes time to pay the piper, and nowhere have I seen this described better by Trollope.

A late in the novel journey by Fred to the house of his lover provides an opportunity to expertly describe how much he has grown to hate the very site of the Irish landscape, all because the consequences of his selfish behavior have started to fall upon him. It is as familiar then as it is today, how once you've given in to your sin, the object of your desire becomes an object of your hatred. Top notch Trollope!!

Others have noted this is not Trollope's more typical "lighthearted" fare, and I agree the final chapters are pretty grim. However, the overall tone of the novel is not nearly as despairing as some of his other works. Fred, rogue as his actions may become, remains a very likable character throughout - and this is important because I believe the intent was to show that not everyone who acts badly is a wicked person. Fred Neville does some poor and selfish things, but they are not the act of a villain, but rather a young person who makes too many mistakes before his adult life can really take off. The true tragedy here is seeing how pride can ruin a man!

I can't recommend this one enough - it is certainly in my Top Ten from this author.
Doomblade Doomblade
An Eye for an Eye is representative of Trollope's mid-level work ... certainly not his best (The Warden, Dr. Thorne, Barchester Chronicles, The Pallisers, and my favorite, Phineas Finn) but well above some of his worst. His usual and central themes of love, class, inheritance, marriage, religion, greed, and nationality are front and center in this novel. The main plot addresses the wealthy (Protestant) heir in England spending time on the West coast of Ireland and finding a charming girl and her mother living in a small cottage ... did I mention the local priest? I'm not a spoiler, but Trollope's plot is a bit more tragic than usual. Entertaining read ... if you like Trollope (which I do.)
Winawel Winawel
I disagree with one of the other reviewers that this book is a "light read." It is assuredly not in the comic vein of most of Trollope's novels and it is, if anything, "heavy" indeed! It is cast in the mold of a classical tragedy with the hero conflicted between his duty to his family and his duty to the woman he loves. Trollope dearly loves to place his characters in such a bind, but this time it doesn't have a happy ending as is so often the case. It is thus atypical of Trollope's novels,though it does reveal the author's romantic preference for love over duty. In many ways this may be his most powerful statement for that preference as love does not win out in the end. I strongly recommend it, but as with one of the other reviewers, not as a first taste of Trollope. The book is quite different from most of his many other novels.
Ballazan Ballazan
Not one of his best, but still good. It has a poetic ending, which is very plausible. He brings to light the true meaning of "an eye for an eye" - but you have to wait for it. As he always does, he keeps you interested with the enigma of just what is going to happen all the way to the end. His touches of humor as he describes certain people prove he's a master of all sorts of prose. I recommend the book - along with the others of his I've read so far.