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eBook My Son's Story ePub

eBook My Son's Story ePub

by Nadine Gordimer

  • ISBN: 0140159754
  • Category: Literary
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Nadine Gordimer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Penguin Books; Reprint edition (December 1, 1991)
  • Pages: 288
  • ePub book: 1112 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1577 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi azw rtf
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 729

Description

My Son's Story is the ninth novel by South African novelist Nadine Gordimer. It was written towards the end of the State of Emergency and first published in 1990.

My Son's Story is the ninth novel by South African novelist Nadine Gordimer. The very next year, Gordimer was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature, and the Swedish Academy explicitly cited My Son's Story in their press release, calling it "ingenious and revealing and at the same time enthralling".

Читать онлайн My Son's Story. He bought books that kept him from Shakespeare.

Nadine Gordimer My Son's Story For Reinhold You had a Father, let your son say so. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE, Sonnet 13 ~ ~ ~ How did I find out? I was deceiving hi. ovember. I was on study leave - for two weeks before the exams pupils in the senior classes were allowed to stay home to prepare themselves. Читать онлайн My Son's Story.

Another wonderful book by Gordimer, I thought this was a seamlessly written gem. Again Gordimer tells a riveting story, creates fully drawn characters, brilliantly uses interior monologue and descriptive writing, and at the same time inserts the insideousness of racism and the scars of apartheid between every line.

Friends and even relatives who had applied to see him had been denied permission; political comrades dared not show themselves for fear they’d be locked up, as well om outside

Friends and even relatives who had applied to see him had been denied permission; political comrades dared not show themselves for fear they’d be locked up, as well om outside. Then he saw only Aila, and once or twice the children were allowed to accompany her. That was as he had expected. He knew he was on his way to prison from the days back in the coloured location of his home-town on the Reef when he had led his pupils across the veld to the black location-as he still called those places, then.

We Will change Pakistan. Sector 99. Organization.

Gordimer has taken South Africa's tragedy and laid the truth of it in our laps. The story she tells is lucid and achingly alive. - The Boston Sunday Globe.

Nadine Gordimer's many novels include THE LYING DAYS, THE CONSERVATIONIST, joint winner of the Booker Prize, BURGER'S DAUGHTER, JULY'S PEOPLE, MY SON'S STORY, NONE TO ACCOMPANY ME, A GUEST OF HONOUR and THE HOUSE GUN. Her collections of short stories include SOMETHING OUT THERE and JUMP. In 1991 she was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature. She lives in South Africa.

Also by Nadine Gordimer. You had a Father, let your son say so. WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE.

Nadine Gordimers My Sons Story published in 1990 several issues of the time - inter-racial love, adultery and . In the novel, Gordimer continues her engagements with complexities in human relationships in a racially divided South Africa.

Nadine Gordimers My Sons Story published in 1990 several issues of the time - inter-racial love, adultery and the ongoing revolution to overthrow apartheid in South Africa and brings them together in an exceptionally well told story format from the view point of the boy Will in first person, and his father Sonny in third person. Will is also the persona of Gordimer and thus his serves as the multifaceted voice, the narrative of which throws light on the other characters revolving around him in the novel.

"Gordimer has taken South Africa's tragedy and laid the truth of it in our laps. The story she tells is lucid and achingly alive."—The Boston Sunday Globe.

Comments

Marilace Marilace
Gordimer is the Nobel prize-winning author of many books about the politics of South Africa. This story takes place just as Apartheid is coming to an end. There is no mention of important figures, such as Nelson Mandela, although the "struggle" (as it is euphemistically called) forms a backdrop to the drama of the novel. Without giving too much away, and focusing on the writing style as primary, I can see why Gordimer won the prize. The prose is tight, elegant and deftly moving. This is a story of betrayal and what happens when an affair invades the family space. Everyone is affected and "the struggle" begins to invade the whole of the family, a family that has been able to compartmentalize its politics up until the affair occurs. What was a safe and welcoming atmosphere becomes charged with tension and unexpected occurrences change the nature of the family's relationships. Gordimer weaves her tale with skill and the language is straightforward and prosaic. I highly recommend this story. Unlike other reviewers, I will not give the tale away. It is for the reader to discover its depths. I understand that Gordimer, who is white, is from a rather prominent family in South Africa but identifies with the black Africans in their struggle for freedom. She is quite adamant, in this story, that equality is not sufficient. The only acceptable existence for all South Africans is freedom. But what of those who are white and born in South Africa? Are they not native Africans as well? In her other books, she addresses this question head on. However, in "My Son's Story" the "struggle" structures the story but is an aside to the main theme of betrayal. I can't wait to read her other work. Significantly, Gordimer is only the seventh woman to win the Nobel in its 90 year history.
Rexfire Rexfire
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The story revolves around a 'coloured' family living under apartheid. To begin with, an ideal nuclear family: father a teacher, a beautiful mother and two children. When the father accedes to his students' wishes that he accompany them on a protest march, he is sacked, and devotes himself full time to the cause. And on the way falls in love with a white woman with the same aims...
I found it hard to keep on with this one: whether it's Ms Gordimer's writing style, or the subject matter - as the son's father rises in the ranks of Freedom Fighters, with all the politics that entails.
Ghordana Ghordana
Gordimer's intricate tale of an educated black family struggling with the evils of apartheid is most noteworthy for its rich characterization. The story is told primarily by Will, the teenage son of anti-apartheid activist Sonny. Will acknowledges the horrors of the political situation around him but is painfully affected by the domestic consequences of social change (first his father's affair with white activist Hannah, and later his mother's imprisonment).
The complexity of the writing is necessary for conveying the emotional weight of the story. The chapters alternate (roughly) between the first person narration of Will and a third person account of the unfolding situation. This allows the reader to experience the pain and ambivalence Will feels, while also making the reader aware of the secrets that the family members keep from each other.
I disagree with the other reviewers that Gordimer's work is overly cerebral (if you want to see pretentious, dry, and overintellectualized, check out fellow African author J. M. Coetzee... yawn). My Son's Story is brilliantly realized in terms of both form and content. Without its complexity, the book would not be as believable, heartfelt, or utterly tragic... although I probably wouldn't have appreciated it in the ninth grade either.
Grosho Grosho
The book describes well the complexities of relationships- between the son, Will, and his father, Sonny; between Sonny and his wife Aila; between Sonny and his lover Hannah, between everyone and the political situation at hand. However, the frequency of pronouns can be confusing and the long, impassioned dialogues never directly state anything at all. One must already be familiar with the apartheid and liberation movement to fully comprehend the book.
Shezokha Shezokha
While I was very interested in the story's premise initially, I found the experience of reading the book a tedious one. Every now and then, I would read a thought that was uniquely expressed and thought provoking but it was largely a disappointment.
Vonalij Vonalij
This was an extremely well-written story of the effect of apartheid on one black family in SA. The writing is not fast-reading but well-done. It adds to he impressive oevre dealing with conditions in SA but personalizes the problems there.