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eBook Buddhism and the Mythology of Evil: A Study in Theravada Buddhism ePub

eBook Buddhism and the Mythology of Evil: A Study in Theravada Buddhism ePub

by Trevor Ling

  • ISBN: 1851681329
  • Category: Mythology and Folk Tales
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Trevor Ling
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oneworld (August 1, 1997)
  • Pages: 180
  • ePub book: 1662 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1104 kb
  • Other: azw docx lrf txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 903

Description

The mythology of evil is as manifold as it is universal. Therefore, although this is primarily a study in Theravāda Buddhism, it is hoped that it will have some value as a contribution to the study of religion in the wider sense

The mythology of evil is as manifold as it is universal. A sense of life's evil seems to have haunted men from the earliest times, and has found expression in a wide variety of popular beliefs. The general theme of this book is the relationship that is capable of existing between such popular beliefs, which belong properly to the realm of folk-lore, and the special insights of a radical religion of salvation. Therefore, although this is primarily a study in Theravāda Buddhism, it is hoped that it will have some value as a contribution to the study of religion in the wider sense. It is based largely upon the evidence of the Pāli canon.

In my early study of Buddhism I read several books by Trevor Ling whose interest was largely with the Theravada .

In my early study of Buddhism I read several books by Trevor Ling whose interest was largely with the Theravada Buddhism of Burma. Recently I discovered a book of Ling's 'Buddhism and the mythology of evil' first published in 1962 which discusses the various mythological 'evil' creatures and compares them to Mara as a symbol of evil. Ling points out that Buddhist teachers have embraced the existing folk beliefs rather than contradict them but have used the all-encompassing name of Mara.

An exploration of evil and evil figures in religious tradition, this book examines the popular mythologies of demons and evil spirits; the Buddhist path to overcoming the experience of evil; the legend of Mara, the Evil One; and the New.

An exploration of evil and evil figures in religious tradition, this book examines the popular mythologies of demons and evil spirits; the Buddhist path to overcoming the experience of evil; the legend of Mara, the Evil One; and the New Testament symbol of Satan and his relationship with Mara.

Combining myth and legend, demonology and scripture, this is a scholarly exploration of the special insights of. .Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

Combining myth and legend, demonology and scripture, this is a scholarly exploration of the special insights of religion into evil. To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number.

Buddhism and the mythology of evil, a study in Theravāda Buddhism. The legend and cult of Upagupta, Sanskrit Buddhism in North India and Southeast Asia. London: Allen & Unwin. Princeton: Princeton University Press.

Buddhism and Mythology of Evil : A Study in Theravada Buddhism. Combining myth and legend, demonology and scripture, this is a scholarly exploration of the special insights of religion into evil, particularly in Buddhism and Christianity.

Early Buddhism acknowledged both a literal and psychological interpretation of Mara. BoD – Books on Demand. Ling, Trevor O. (1962). Buddhism and the Mythology of Evil: A Study in Theravada Buddhism. London: Allen and Unwin. "摩羅(まら)とは - Weblio辞書".

Buddhism: The early Buddhist schools and doctrinal history ; Theravāda doctrine, Volume 2. Taylor & Francis. Keown, Damien (2009). The Buddha's Encounters with Mara the Tempter: Their Representation in Literature and Art. Taming the Mara. Mara, the Evil One 99. php?title Mara (demon)&oldid 929348822".

Buddhism and the Mythology of Evil: A Study in Theravada Buddhism by Trevor Ling. Early Advaita Vedanta and Buddhism, The Mahayana Context of the Gaudapadiya-Karika, by Richard King (State University of New York Press, New York: 1995). I've been waiting for many years for a book that would trace the relationship between Vedanta and Buddhism, and Richard King has produced a balanced, scholarly study that is quite readable. He has centered his thesis on an analysis of an early (pre-Shankara) Vedantic text, the Gaudapadiya-Karika (GK).

Theravada Buddhism is strongest in Sri Lanka, Cambodia, Thailand, Laos and Burma (Myanmar). Supernatural powers are not disregarded but they are incidental and the Buddha warned against them as fetters on the path. It is sometimes called Southern Buddhism and is one of the largest subdivisions of Buddhism. The Buddha: Siddhartha Gautama was a man who became Buddha, the Awakened One - much in the same way as Jesus became Christ. Since his death the only contact with him is through his teachings which point to the awakened state. God: There is no omnipotent creator God of the sort found in Judaism, Islam and Christianity.

Combining myth and legend, demonology and scripture, this is a scholarly exploration of the special insights of religion into evil, particularly in Buddhism and Christianity.