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eBook How Charlie Shavers Died and Other Poems (Wesleyan Poetry Series) ePub

eBook How Charlie Shavers Died and Other Poems (Wesleyan Poetry Series) ePub

by Harvey Shapiro

  • ISBN: 0819564613
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Harvey Shapiro
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wesleyan; 1st edition (July 29, 2001)
  • Pages: 88
  • ePub book: 1907 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1175 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf azw doc
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 599

Description

In 1997, Wesleyan and Carcanet co-published his Selected Poems.

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This World: Poems (The Wesleyan poetry program).

Are you sure you want to remove How Charlie Shavers died and other poems from your list? There's no description for this book ye. 2001, Wesleyan University Press.

2001, Wesleyan University Press.

How Many Times: How many times; Can you go back to the same scene; With love? I never hope to know.

It developed into a highly personal, taut, and largely understated voice. How Many Times: How many times; Can you go back to the same scene; With love? I never hope to know. We work patiently at our quarrels,/Starting them now like love,/Deliberately but with elaborate/Ease.

Used with permission. He died on January 7, 2013.

How Charlie Shavers Died, and other poems. Middletown, CT: Wesleyan University Press, 2001. The Sights Along the Harbor: New and collected poems.

He served in World War II as an Air Force tail gunner and earned degrees from Yale and Columbia. Beyond the Demonic Element.

He replied, I should have been a doctor.

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With enormous wit and vitality, Harvey Shapiro's new collection of poems focuses on the approach of death, mingling canny observations of the city that never sleeps with homages to Hart Crane, George Oppen, the poet Rachel, and David Ignatow. Characterized by its focus on the urban world of New York, the Jewish tradition, and domesticity, Shapiro's poetry achieves a distinctive brilliance and true wisdom. These poems view life from the vantage of seventy-six years, deeply informed by the serious study of literature and language and always attuned to the present, as well as to the body, weather, and sex. With its passion, humor, and rich detail, this exquisite volume marks Harvey Shapiro's finest work to date.

Comments

Ytli Ytli
I enjoyed this slim work because it epitomizes for me both the America I know and the America I imagine.

The language is terse regardless of the length of the individual poems.
Unereel Unereel
excellent service and product
Maldarbaq Maldarbaq
I was quite disappointed in the book...too much reliance on f-word and other smutty language. Read some, scanned other poems, and then threw the book into the garbage. I did that and I am a poetry lover and protector of poetry books, usually.

How Charlie Shavers Died and Other Poems is title of book.
Chi Chi
Harvey Shapiro, who died on January 7, 2013, at age eighty-eight, was not an ingratiating poet. His view could be bleak, but almost always it was somehow life-affirming as well. He was often hardest on himself, though the bitterness of a poem is frequently mixed with the sweetness of humor. He had a wide range---from Jewish lore to street life in New York, from death to erotic love---and the same poem can be heartbreaking and caustically funny ("6/20/97," about visiting David Ignatow in the hospital, for example). While many of his poems take the form of pointed anecdotes with wry morals, there is frequently a strong undercurrent of deep love for what he is describing, or, in the case of the title poem of this collection, profound sadness plain and simple. I heard someone say that they thought his general lack of metaphorical language made him less approachable than other poets; that may be true, but he also wrote beautifully in the post-Williams mode. And like much of Williams (if not most of his followers), the unassuming everyday language somehow is poetry and not just prose broken up into short lines. When I saw that the only comment on How Charlie Shavers Died was by someone who rated it only one star because of "too much use of the f-word," I had to register my disagreement with such myopia (verging on total blindness).