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eBook Field work ePub

eBook Field work ePub

by Seamus Heaney

  • ISBN: 057111430X
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Seamus Heaney
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber; 1st UK Edition edition (1979)
  • Pages: 64
  • ePub book: 1373 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1676 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf docx azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 521

Description

Seamus Justin Heaney MRIA (/ˈʃeɪməs ˈhiːni/; 13 April 1939 – 30 August 2013) was an Irish poet, playwright and translator. He received the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature

Seamus Justin Heaney MRIA (/ˈʃeɪməs ˈhiːni/; 13 April 1939 – 30 August 2013) was an Irish poet, playwright and translator. He received the 1995 Nobel Prize in Literature. Among his best-known works is Death of a Naturalist (1966), his first major published volume. Heaney was recognised as one of the principal contributors to poetry during his lifetime.

Seamus Heaney (1939-2013) received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. 6 people found this helpful. His poems, plays, translations, and essays include Opened Ground, Electric Light, Beowulf, The Spirit Level, District and Circle, and Finders Keepers. Robert Lowell praised Heaney as the "most important Irish poet since Yeats.

Seamus Heaney, born the following year, has learned hi "Field Work," which first appeared in 1979, is a superb collection of lyrics and narrative poems from one of the literary masters of our time

Seamus Heaney, born the following year, has learned hi "Field Work," which first appeared in 1979, is a superb collection of lyrics and narrative poems from one of the literary masters of our time. Seamus Heaney, born the following year, has learned his trade so well that it is now a second nature wonderfully responsive to his first.

Seamus Heaney is widely recognized as one of the major poets of the .

Seamus Heaney is widely recognized as one of the major poets of the 20th century. As Blake Morrison noted in his work Seamus Heaney, the author is "that rare thing, a poet rated highly by critics and academics yet popular with 'the common reader. Heaney's poetry is known for its aural beauty and finely-wrought textures.

Field Work, which first appeared in 1979, is a superb collection of lyrics and narrative poems from one of the literary masters of our time.

Seamus Heaney was born in County Derry in Northern Ireland. Death of a Naturalist, his first collection of poems, appeared in 1966 and since then he has published poetry, criticism and translations - including Beowulf (1999) - which have established him as one of the leading poets now at work. In 1995 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. District and Circle (2006) was awarded the T. S. Eliot Prize in 2006.

Field Work is the record of four years during which Seamus Heaney left the violence of Belfast to settle in a country . A superb book, the most eloquent and far-reaching book has written, a perennial poetry offered at a time when many of us have despaired of seeing such a thing.

Field Work is the record of four years during which Seamus Heaney left the violence of Belfast to settle in a country cottage with his family in Glanmore, C. . Seamus Heaney (1939-2013) received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995.

Field Work: Faber Modern Classics (Paperback). Seamus Heaney (author). Seamus Heaney was 'the greatest poet of our age' (Guardian). From his remarkable debut in 1966, he pioneered the poetry of our times across five decades of cultural and political change, and was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. A Nobel laureate, Heaney twice secured the Whitbread Book of the Year Award (for The Spirit Level and Beowulf: A New Translation) and won the . Eliot Prize for his collection District and Circle. The Rattle Bag, the anthology he co-curated with Ted Hughes, is one of the finest and popular poetry collections of its kind.

Seamus Heaney obituary. Mortality and domestic relations, affection and obligation, had preoccupied Heaney throughout his work, and were frequently sounded together. Irish poet and Nobel laureate whose lines of love and loss took inspiration from his childhood in Derry. One of his most popular poems, Mid-Term Break, from his collection Death of a Naturalist (1966), handles the death of his younger brother Christopher in a road accident in 1953, when Heaney was still a schoolboy; that loss is returned to again in the superb late poem The Blackbird of Glanmore, in District and Circle (2006), which is. also concerned with intimations of the poet's own mortality.

(Field Work, which first appeared in 1979, is a superb collection of lyrics and narrative poems from one of the literary masters of our time. Field Work is the record of four years during which Seamus Heaney left the violence of Belfast to settle in a country cottage with his family in Glanmore, County Wicklow. Heeding an early warning system to get back inside my own head, Heaney wrote poems with a new strength and maturity, moving from the political concerns of his landmark volume North to a more personal, contemplative approach to the world and to his own writing. As the critic Dennis Donoghue wrote in The New York Times Book Review: In 1938, not a moment too soon, W. B. Yeats admonished his colleagues: 'Irish poets, learn your trade.' Seamus Heaney, born the following year, has learned his trade so well that it is now a second nature wonderfully responsive to his first. And the proof is in Field Work, a superb book . . . [This is] a perennial poetry offered at a time when many of us have despaired of seeing such a thing. In Field Work he brings a meditative music to bear upon fundamental themes of person and place, the mutuality of ourselves and the world Heaney is keyed and pitched unlike any significant poet now at work in the language, anywhere. Harold Bloom, The Times Literary Supplement For all the qualities I list, the most important is song [and] the tune Heaney sings [is] poetry's tune, resolutions of cherished language. Donald Hall, The Nation. Seamus Heaney received the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. His recent translations include Beowulf and Diary of One Who Vanished; his recent poetry collections include Opened Ground and Electric Light)

Comments

Vizuru Vizuru
This is another old favorite of mine, ordered from Amazon with income tax refund this year. I had not realized Seamus Heaney had passed - so glad I was able to get a copy of this book. My library does not have it, any longer. He was a wonderful poet, winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1995. Several of his books are currently out of print, but if you run across them, give them a read. Most of us remember Beowulf, but he had many poems, lilting and running across the heart.
JUST DO IT JUST DO IT
Poetry is never always easy to understand, even for a poet. But this little collection creates a mood that is like singing water. It soothes and lays you down to rest.
Mallador Mallador
No matter how many times I read Heaney's work, it gets better every time.
Gralinda Gralinda
Seamus Heaney, in "Field Work" makes accessible what is best about poetry and, especially, modern Irish poetry. Heaney's impact on modern poetry will certainly extend on into the centuries as he lays down his words in beautiful rythmic language, a language forgotten by many contemporaries, but coming back with many new poets. Heaney's protrait of Irish life, the "troubles", and just his love of people and the land makes this a must read not only for those who love good poetry, but wish to understand the beauty, people, politics, and history of a great people to be free. Heaney writes no bad poems, remains accessible to the occasional reader, and offers more than enough solid food for the critic and student of poetics to keep all happy for long after the read.
Olma Olma
Bought this for a class concerning War & Poetry in the 20th century.
For many readers unfamiliar with the Irish's The Troubles (and Ireland's history), the poems may across as confusing. It takes a while to get used to Heaney's style as well as the imagery (which are set in Ireland). Deeper analysis of the poems provide better understanding to Heaney's overall message of the collection.

For the class, this book teaches a lot of how poetry intertwines with the political conflicts in history.
Personally, I'm not a big fan of Heaney, but that's more due to my unfamiliarity with the diction.
Heaney is one the greatest and well-known Irish writers/poets, so his work is a good source for finding Irish nationalism.
Thetalas Thetalas
"Old ploughsocks gorge the subsoil of each sense / And I am quickened with a redolence / Of the fundamental dark unblown rose." In the face of such mastery, we cannot comment or explicate, for fear of impertinence; we can only quote, and hope that something of the maker's joy communicates itself.

This was the third book of poetry that this reviewer purchased as a youth, the first two being Eliot's Four Quartets and Rimbaud's Illuminations. This book remains a favourite of ours, fifteen years after its purchase.

The Glanmore Sonnets occupy a central position in this slender but rich volume, as is fitting; it is perhaps Heaney's masterwork. The Elegy to Robert Lowell, the "welder of English" who composed "heart-hammering blank sonnets of love for Harriet and Lizzie" is also noteworthy.

There is much about the sectarian warfare of the troubled six counties of Northern Ireland, but like Dante (who appears via epigraph and translation in this book) Heane!y can transfigure the sins of his land into glorious language that is an exemplar of poetry's redemptive potentiality. "I think our very form is bound to change ... Unless forgiveness finds its nerve and voice."

There is much here about love, nuptial, natural, sexual. At the end of "The Guttural Muse," there is a couplet of exclusion from the joyful earthiness that the poet observes: "I felt like some old pike all badged with sores / Wanting to swim in touch with soft-mouthed life."

There is warfare and loss, violence and bliss, the joys of the flesh and the crucifixion of a country. But after reading the poems in FIELD WORK, the reader will doubtless share in Seamus Heaney's faith that "the end of art is peace."
Jeronashe Jeronashe
With "Field Work" the metaphor of "digging" with which Seamus Heaney began his first volume of poetry ("Death of a Naturalist") has become a succinct and overarching symbol of his entire literary endeavour. In that poem "digging" comes to connote the agricultural roots of his childhood (and of the Irish people) but also the search for word-fodder that his poetry enacts. "Field Work" continues to explore these concerns in a powerful collection of poems. Here the deeply personal ("Glanmore Sonnets"), primarly poetic ("Elegy") and cautiously political ("Triptych", "The Toome Road") sit comfortably alongside one another. While Heaney (as the most famous voice in contemporary Irish literature) has been repeatedly criticised for his silence on the Ulster situation, this volume shows that (as in "North") he is able to deal with its complex issues without taking sides. Always his concern is for the impartial victim (the position he himself assumes, that of the "unmolested orchid" ["Triptych 1"]) and the place he or she occupies among the combatants. "Casualty" describes a friendly but laconic pub drinker (apolitical and an acquaintance of Heaney's) who was killed by the British for defying curfew. "Triptych 1" includes the description of "Two young men with rifles on the hill" - we do not know if they are Unionists or I.R.A., they are two sides of the same coin. Heaney's continual "digging" allows him to move beneath the emotive surface of events and to unearth their common history, culture, landscape, experience. In "Field Work" the very poetry with which Heaney draws these moments is itself a tool to pare bloody and partisan politics back to its single seed, the common root of the Irish field and furrow.