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eBook Out There Somewhere (Sun Tracks) ePub

eBook Out There Somewhere (Sun Tracks) ePub

by Simon J. Ortiz

  • ISBN: 0816522103
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Simon J. Ortiz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: University of Arizona Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2002)
  • Pages: 172
  • ePub book: 1382 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1223 kb
  • Other: mobi docx doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 369

Description

Out There Somewhere (Sun Tracks). Library Journal" wise and prophetic book. the autobiography of the spirit of Simon J. Ortiz, who has advanced out of the mist of the reservation and into an affirmative and natural embracing of the world as it i. -El Palacio.

Out There Somewhere (Sun Tracks). After and Before the Lightning (Sun Tracks). Series: Sun Tracks (Book 21).

Out There Somewhere book. Out There Somewhere (Sun Tracks, V. 49). ISBN. 0816522103 (ISBN13: 9780816522101). Simon Ortiz, one of our finest living poets, has been a witness, participant, and observer of interactions between the Euro-American cultural world and that of his Native American people for many years. In this collection of haunting new work, he confronts moments and instances of hi He has been out there somewhere for a while now, a poet at large in America.

Poet, fiction writer, essayist, and storyteller Simon Ortiz is a native of Acoma Pueblo and is the author of numerous books. Библиографические данные. Out There Somewhere Sun Tracks, V. 49 Sun Tracks: An American Indian Literary (Том 49) Sun tracks (Том 49). Автор. University of Arizona Press, 2002. 0816522103, 9780816522101.

He has been out there somewhere for a while now, a poet at large in America. In this collection of haunting new work, he confronts moments and instances of his personal past-and finds redemption in the wellspring of his culture.

Acoma Indians - Poetry. New Mexico - Poetry. University of Arizona Press. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on October 23, 2014. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

He has been out there somewhere for a while w, a poet at large in America

He has been out there somewhere for a while w, a poet at large in America. In this collection of haunting new work, he confronts moments and instances of his personal past and finds redemption in the wellspring of his culture. Like many of his fellow Native Americans, Ortiz has been out there somewhere Portland and San Francisco, Freiburg, Germany, and Martinique away from his original homeland, culture, and community.

Out there somewhere Simon J. Ortiz. Out there somewhere Simon J. Download PDF book format. Choose file format of this book to download: pdf chm txt rtf doc. Download this format book. Book's title: Out there somewhere Simon J. Library of Congress Control Number: 2001002743.

Simon J. Ortiz (born May 27, 1941) is a Puebloan writer of the Acoma Pueblo tribe, and one of the key figures in the second wave of what has been called the Native American Renaissance. He is one of the most respected and widely read Native American poets. Ortiz identifies himself less as a "poet" than a "storyteller".

He has been out there somewhere for a while now, a poet at large in America.   Simon Ortiz, one of our finest living poets, has been a witness, participant, and observer of interactions between the Euro-American cultural world and that of his Native American people for many years. In this collection of haunting new work, he confronts moments and instances of his personal past—and finds redemption in the wellspring of his culture.   A writer known for deeply personal poetry, Ortiz has produced perhaps his most personal work to date. In a collage of journal entries, free-verse poems, and renderings of poems in the Acoma language, he draws on life experiences over the past ten years—recalling time spent in academic conferences and writers' colonies, jails and detox centers—to convey something of the personal and cultural history of dislocation. As an American Indian artist living at times on the margins of mainstream culture, Ortiz has much to tell about the trials of alcoholism, poverty, displacement. But in the telling he affirms the strength of Native culture even under the most adverse conditions and confirms the sustaining power of Native beliefs and connections: "With our hands, we know the sacred earth. / With our spirits, we know the sacred sky."   Like many of his fellow Native Americans, Ortiz has been "out there somewhere"—Portland and San Francisco, Freiburg, Germany, and Martinique—away from his original homeland, culture, and community. Yet, as these works show, he continues to be absolutely connected socially and culturally to Native identity: "We insist that we as human cultural beings must always have this connection," he writes, "because it is the way we maintain a Native sense of existence." Drawing on this storehouse of places, times, and events, Out There Somewhere is a rich fusion taking readers into the heart and soul of one of today's most exciting and original American poets.

Comments

Khiceog Khiceog
Simon Ortiz remains one of the most well-known American Indian (Acoma Pueblo) poets living today. He began writing during the American Indian Literary Renaissance and is quite prolific. His poetry weaves real-life events, oral stories, history, and Pueblo culture together, creating experiences that allow both Native and non-Native readers insights into Ortiz's world.

Out There Somewhere is divided into six parts. Part I (Margins) contains numerous politically driven statements that discuss colonization and post-colonization effects on Native peoples. Many of the poems are also written as if they are journal entries, and several reveal personal past experiences that Ortiz himself faced. This includes instances where individuals call the Pueblo language "foreign"--which of course it cannot be, as it is a language that is Indigenous to the North Americas and is not "foreign."

Part II (Images) deals with self-identity issues. I believe that one of the strongest poems in the entire book--"What Indians?"--is found in this section. This poem discusses the way in which colonized peoples are often forced into a certain identity by those that have colonized them. The poem states:

Like other colonized Indigenous peoples, cultures, and communities throughout the world, Native Americans have experienced and endured identities imposed upon them by colonial powers, most of which originated in Europe. This imposition as resulted to a great extent--more than we admit and realize--in the loss of a sense of a centered human self and the weakening and loss of Indigenous cultural identity.

Part III (Gifts) delves into small daily gifts that people have in their lives. This includes family for many. For Ortiz, he also counts a special garden that he and his family tend. Part IV (Horizons) includes several key poems that discuss knowledge, especially Pueblo language, and how it can be used. This section includes the "Acoma Poems" which are written entirely in Acoma Pueblo language--a special treat!--and they are then translated. I find it quite significant to see Indigenous authors writing in their own language; this section is beautifully written. Part V (Ever) includes several pieces that deal with ceremonies and Part VI (Connections After All) has some wonderful poems that are to be read more like songs.

Overall, all of these poems leave an impression on the reader. Ortiz masterfully uses different types of poems to relay information to the reader, sharing with us what it means to be Acoma Pueblo, Native, American, and a human. The imagery is fascinating and poems like "What Indians?" will leave you reflecting. Highly recommended!
Raelin Raelin
The "stars" of American Indian literature--James Welch, Leslie Silko, Scott Momaday--are only the beautiful surface of the genre. Dive deeper, and you will find treasures like Peter Blue Cloud, Ray Young Bear, Anita Endrezze, and the incomparable Simon J. Ortiz.
Ortiz writes with a brilliance and clarity all Americans could aspire to, and this little collection of pieces, modulating from the grim depths of alcoholism and prison to the open spaces filled with joyful children, is representative of his work. His meditation on a sparrow's nest is worth the cover charge, discussion of the place of English in the mind of the Indian artist ("Beauty All Around") is a model of deeply felt exposition, and the cycle of poems on whether Indians exist is both witty and tragic.
Taste the best, a literary flavor perhaps too exotic for the general reader, but worth the adventure. This is a writer to remember and return to.
Hunaya Hunaya
great
Brakora Brakora
required school