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eBook Fighting Words and Feuding Words: Anger and the Homeric Poems (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) ePub

eBook Fighting Words and Feuding Words: Anger and the Homeric Poems (Greek Studies: Interdisciplinary Approaches) ePub

by Thomas R. Walsh

  • ISBN: 0739112554
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Thomas R. Walsh
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Lexington Books (July 11, 2005)
  • Pages: 316
  • ePub book: 1233 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1874 kb
  • Other: rtf txt doc lrf
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 130

Description

Yet Homer uses over a dozen words for anger. Fighting Words and Feuding Words engages the powerful tools of Homeric poetic analysis and the anthropological study of emotion in an analysis of two anger terms highlighted in the Iliad by the Achaean prophet Calchas.

Yet Homer uses over a dozen words for anger. Walsh argues that kotos and kholos locate two focal points for the study of aggression in Homeric poetry, the first presenting HomerOs terms for feud and the second providing the native terms that designates the martial violence highlighted by the Homeric tradition.

Homeric Anger Part I. Feuding Words. The Center for Hellenic Studies 3100 Whitehaven Street, NW. 1. The Prophet Defines 2. Forms and Formulae 3. Κότος and Social Status 4. Anger’s History: Κότος and Etymology 5. Anger’s Aggression: The Wrath of Feud Part II. Fighting Words.

Anger and the Homeric Poems. Publisher: Lexington Books. Print ISBN: 9780739112649, 0739112643.

Bookish words are mostly loan-words, Latin and Greek. Poeticisms, words used exclusively in poetry and the like. They are used to create romantic atmosphere, the general colouring of elevation. They are either high-flown synonyms of neutral words, or popular terms of science. The colouring may be described as poetic and solemn at the same time.

Pope renders this in words which, whatever be their intrinsic merit, are, as a translation, at once diffuse and defective . This line, in truth, affords an admirable touchstone for the meaning of two important Homeric words.

Pope renders this in words which, whatever be their intrinsic merit, are, as a translation, at once diffuse and defective: ‘Where mighty towns in ruins spread the plain, And saw their blooming warriors early slain. The vulgar meaning takes Διοτρεφέων αἰζήων as simply illustrious youths. What could Homer mean by cities of illustrious youths? Is it their sovereigns or their fighting population? Were their sovereigns all youths? Were their fighting population all illustrious?

The series of essays collected together as Part I - "Logic and Conversation" - where Grice introduces the notion of Conversational Implicature, are worth the cover price alone. Other essays include "Meaning" where Grice draws a distinction between what he called ‘natural meaning’ and non-natural meaning. As a philosophical text, Grice's work is a bit difficult to plow through.

The words of Dante's character as he exhorts his men to the journey find parallel in those of Tennyson's Ulysses, who calls his men to join . However, critics note that in the Homeric narrative, Ulysses' original mariners are dead

The words of Dante's character as he exhorts his men to the journey find parallel in those of Tennyson's Ulysses, who calls his men to join him on one last voyage. However, critics note that in the Homeric narrative, Ulysses' original mariners are dead. A significant irony therefore develops from Ulysses' speech to his sailors-"Come, my friends,, 'Tis not too late to seek a newer world" (56–57).

Anger is central to the Homeric epic, but few scholarly interventions have probed Homer's language beyond the study of the Iliad's first word: menis. Yet Homer uses over a dozen words for anger. Fighting Words and Feuding Words engages the powerful tools of Homeric poetic analysis and the anthropological study of emotion in an analysis of two anger terms highlighted in the Iliad by the Achaean prophet Calchas. Walsh argues that kotos and kholos locate two focal points for the study of aggression in Homeric poetry, the first presenting Homer's terms for feud and the second providing the native terms that designates the martial violence highlighted by the Homeric tradition. After focusing on these two terms as used in the Iliad and the Odyssey, Walsh concludes by addressing some post-Homeric and comparative implications of Homeric anger.