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eBook Sông I Sing ePub

eBook Sông I Sing ePub

by Bao Phi

  • ISBN: 1566892791
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Bao Phi
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Coffee House Press (September 20, 2011)
  • Pages: 170
  • ePub book: 1346 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1814 kb
  • Other: lit mobi mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 207

Description

Bao Phi has been a National Poetry Slam finalist and appeared on HBO's Def Poetry. Both books revolve around themes of racial identity and racism, with significant portions of each book being devoted to the topic of racially-tinged incidents of police violence.

Bao Phi has been a National Poetry Slam finalist and appeared on HBO's Def Poetry. His poems and essays are widely When it feels like no one lets you live at your own volume. 8 (9)," a poem in Phi's book that was inspired by the 2006 police killing of Hmong-American teen Fong Lee, has a lot of resonances with the sections in Rankine's book that deal with the recent killings of Trayvon Martin and Mark Duggan, for example.

Sông I Sing" is first published book of poems. It was worth the wait. In Sông I Sing, Bao Phi has something to say about being Asian American and an Asian American poet, and he says it in one astonishing poem after another. Even without his voice, his words are loud in all the right moments, and quiet when they need to b. Sông I Sing also rings with poems of love and unforgotten friendship, tributes to otherwise invisible immigrant parents, humanizing portraits of those who have lost or are losing but nonetheless growing up wiser in the face of existential despair.

hello friends, thanks to a grant from the Minnesota State Arts Board, I've been able to plan out a book reading and signing tour for Sông I Sing - Salt Lake City was earlier this month, East Coast will be in October, and . Here's a placeholder postcard for the East Coast part of the tour.

Select Format: Paperback.

He was raised in the Minneapolis suburbs and today Minnesota is his home base. Bao Phi’s poetry kicks ass; I have not read a more powerful book about the individual Vietnamese-American experience. This is the guy I’d like to sic on the authors of Vietnam War books filled with name-calling of Vietnamese and Asians. I’d like him to shout his great poem Vu Nguyen’s Revenge-Nguyen, Vu-Sacramento at them.

Bao Phi. When it feels like no one lets you live at your own volume You sing. Dynamic and eye-opening, this debut by a National Poetry Slam finalist critiques an America sleepwalking through its days and explores the contradictions of race and class. Dynamic and eye-opening, this debut by a National Poetry Slam finalist critiques an America sleepwalking through its days and explores the contradictions of race and class in America. Bao Phi has been a National Poetry Slam finalist and appeared on HBO'sDef Poetry. His poems and essays are widely published in numerous publications including2006 Best American Poetry. Phi lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and works at the Loft Literary Center.

Of Thee I Sing: A Letter to My Daughters is a children's book by Barack Obama, with illustrations by Loren Long. It is described by the publisher as a "tribute to thirteen groundbreaking Americans and the ideals that have shaped our nation.

When it feels like no onelets you liveat your own volume

You sing.

Dynamic and eye-opening, this debut by a National Poetry Slam finalist critiques an America sleepwalking through its days and explores the contradictions of race and class in America.

Bao Phi has been a National Poetry Slam finalist and appeared on HBO's Def Poetry. His poems and essays are widely published in numerous publications including 2006 Best American Poetry. Phi lives in Minneapolis, Minnesota, and works at the Loft Literary Center.

Comments

Rleyistr Rleyistr
Bao Phi combines the rhythm of spoken word poetry with the nostalgia of growing up as a 2nd generation Vietnamese immigrant. The words hit hard and and offer a sense of forgiveness to immigrants while indicting the systems and institutions that create the inequalities we face.

To put it briefly, I cried almost every poem.
TheFresh TheFresh
I read this in a higher-level college class (composed of mainly Asian-Americand and (asian) foreign exchange students), and the whole class had an extremely hard time grasping the poems and their meaning, especially when references of wanting to kill people and such were made (sometimes taking pages of detail). I get that it's art and thats fine, it's just not for everybody.
Mataxe Mataxe
Beautiful, heart wrenching, insightful...
Bearus Bearus
Bao Phi's 'Sông I Sing' was so incredibly good (and highly recommended!) I chose to review it for diaCRITICS (at diacritics.org), a blog for Vietnamese arts, politics, and culture. In that review I made the following observations:

Bao Phi's wordsmithing is quite beautiful and incisive, with carefully crafted alliterations and sensory details. His words retain the immediacy, cadence, rawness of voice and breath, even in print. His bittersweet truths are crisscrossed with scars and yet peppered with affection, as in his vignettes on `The Nguyễns.'

Phi's long-awaited debut collection 'Sông I Sing' brings poetry back to the people like nothing else I've seen in Vietnamese American culture. Although he's dedicated it "for my Asian American people" and he's clearly attentive to concerns of the entire Asian American community, the double entendre of the title's first word shouts out to the Việt community in particular, as sông means river in tiếng Việt.

Phi is wry and witty observer of the registers and markers of inclusion and exclusion, with a deep affection for those who are often violently and mercilessly excluded.

'Sông I Sing' is a clarion call for expressing one's perceptions and experiences, despite the tangles, ruptures, and sutures evident from the outset. Bao Phi's masterful performances and now his first collection of poetry push us all forward into terrain that's both uncharted and familiar.

If you want to check out a more in-depth commentary, the original review is quite long. It can be found by Google-searching: "Call and Response" "Bao Phi"
Dorizius Dorizius
It's not just that Bao Phi's first collection of printed poems is a narrative of an immigrant experience (it does this); it's not just that the poems in here shift between tender and ferocious (which they do); but it's also that we're granted insight into a wholly verbalized experience of being someone else, and how the poet--and speakers in the poems--often have that desire as well, while still maintaining a grip on who he is and where he has come from. It's not a preachy book, but there is plenty to preach about. This book is the poetic equivalent of Juno Diaz' The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao.
Hiylchis Hiylchis
I think what I really enjoyed about this book was the Nguyens. Bao takes on so many different personalities; these people who are tied by their last names, a very common Vietnamese last name. It really showed that yes, these people are Vietnamese and they have the same last names but they come from such different places, have so many different stories, and there is a range of personalities. Not all Asian people are the same. Not all Vietnamese people are the same. Another one of my favorites is Sixth Sense. All in all, a really enjoyable read.
Yllk Yllk
The power within "Song I Sing" lies within the brutal truth of the poetry and the forwardness of its delivery. Song I Sing, is not a book of vague and interpretive poetry, it as much a collection of personal stories as it is a book of poems. Each poem has enough strength to boom when spoken and echo when read silently. If you are looking for a very modern and profound read, especially ones dealing with racism and racial minorities in the United States, than this is your book. This is poetry with an edge.
Bao Phi is a two time Minnesota Grand Slam Poetry Champion, and a National Poetry Slam Finalist. He has wowed audiences for years, and readers of this volume will soon know why.

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