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eBook Death Tractates (Wesleyan Poetry Series) ePub

eBook Death Tractates (Wesleyan Poetry Series) ePub

by Brenda Hillman

  • ISBN: 0819512028
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Brenda Hillman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Wesleyan; 1st edition (May 15, 1992)
  • Pages: 59
  • ePub book: 1696 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1492 kb
  • Other: docx lrf mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 195

Description

In Death Tractates, Brenda Hillman uses poetry to talk about death in a genuine way. In the first poem, for example, some "other voice" is talking to her. Have you ever heard a voice talking to you when you are wondering.

In Death Tractates, Brenda Hillman uses poetry to talk about death in a genuine way. Have you ever heard a voice talking to you when you are wondering about death? . Those lines create for me such a powerful image and metaphor for death: a set of tracks in the forest that stop suddenly, that I feel moved when I read them. The ability to evoke these feelings in a single image is one mark of fine poetry, I believe.

Death Tractates Wesleyan Poetry Series.

Her other books, all published by Wesleyan, include Cascadia (2001), Loose Sugar (1997), Bright Existence (1992), and Fortress (1989). Death Tractates Wesleyan Poetry Series. Wesleyan University Press, 2011. 0819572039, 9780819572035.

Death Tractates book.

Brenda Hillman (born March 27, 1951 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American poet and translator

Brenda Hillman (born March 27, 1951 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American poet and translator

Death Tractates is the companion volume to a philosophical poetic work entitles Bright Existence, which Hillman was in the midst of writing when her friend died.

Death Tractates is the companion volume to a philosophical poetic work entitles Bright Existence, which Hillman was in the midst of writing when her friend died. Poetry & Drama Poetry. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. How do I upload a book?

Hillman’s early poetry collections received critical praise for their .

Hillman’s early poetry collections received critical praise for their transfiguration of experience. With the publication of Loose Sugar, however, Hillman acquired a formidable reputation in the world of contemporary poetry. Hillman spoke to Poets and Writers about her process of composition in Cascadia: One of the ideas I got from André Breton when I read him in college is the use of chance as anchor.

Hanover, NH : University Press of New England. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

In Death Tractates, Brenda Hillman uses poetry to talk about death in a genuine wa. This book contains many such images, often contrasting the poet's sharp eye for details of the changes on the northern California coast during spring with the thoughts and feelings of her friend's death.

Brenda Hillman - Brenda Hillman is the author of ten poetry collections .

Brenda Hillman - Brenda Hillman is the author of ten poetry collections, including Extra Hidden Life, among the Days (Wesleyan University Press . find poems find poets poem-a-day library (texts, books & more) materials for teachers poetry near you. Brenda Hillman. Brenda Hillman was born in Tucson, Arizona, on March 17, 1951. Hillman has authored several full-length collections, the most recent of which is Extra Hidden Life, among the Days (Wesleyan University Press, 2018). Her poems have also been collected in three chapbooks The Firecage (A+Bend Press, 2000); Autumn Sojourn (Em Press, 1995); and Coffee, 3 . The Penumbra Press, 1982).

From the depths of sorrow following the sudden death of her closest female mentor, Brenda Hillman asks anguished questions in this book of poems about separation, spiritual transcendence, and the difference between life and death. Both personal and philosophical, her work can be read as a spirit-guide for those mourning the loss of a loved one and as a series of fundamental ponderings on the inevitability of death and separation. At first refusing to let go, desperate to feel the presence of her friend, the poet seeks solace in a belief in the spirit world. But life, not death, becomes the issue when she begins to see physical existence as “an interruption” that preoccupies us with shapes and borders. “Shape makes life too small,” she realizes. Comfort at last comes in the idea of “reverse seeing”: that even if she cannot see forward into the spirit world, her friend can see “backward into this world” and be with her. Death Tractates is the companion volume to a philosophical poetic work entitles Bright Existence, which Hillman was in the midst of writing when her friend died. Published by Wesleyan University Press in 1993, it shares many of the same Gnostic themes and sources.

Comments

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I was partly motivated to write this review by the unjust and inaccurate view of the book given by the only other review on Amazon. The reviewer makes the cardinal error of pretending that his/her reading of the book somehow contains every possible reading--like a child covering his eyes and believing he's invisible. Every statement the reviewer makes must be translated. For example: "...of interest to no one but the person who wrote it" actually means "not of interest to me."

One of the first lines of contemporary poetry that I felt I could completely agree with was by Marianne Moore about poetry: "I, too, dislike it: there are things that are important beyond / all this fiddle." The (other) reason I'm writing this review, though, is clear for the line that follows: "Reading it, however, with a perfect contempt for it, one / discovers that there is in / it after all, a place for the genuine."

In Death Tractates, Brenda Hillman uses poetry to talk about death in a genuine way. In the first poem, for example, some "other voice" is talking to her. Have you ever heard a voice talking to you when you are wondering about death? I know I have. Anyway, in talking about her friend who has died, this voice says to her:

"She'd given you an impossible task:

she said to follow and you intended to.
But you'd come to a place in the forest
where there weren't any tracks--"

Those lines create for me such a powerful image and metaphor for death: a set of tracks in the forest that stop suddenly, that I feel moved when I read them. I feel awe, wonder, sadness, loss... The ability to evoke these feelings in a single image is one mark of fine poetry, I believe. This book contains many such images, often contrasting the poet's sharp eye for details of the changes on the northern California coast during spring with the thoughts and feelings of her friend's death. Example:

"She had died in the first week of quinces, / when things put forth their secret knowledge: / fiery, random blossoms are allowed to live, / and robins don't seem all that common / as they swing at the tops of cypresses / through new song;"

This poem ends with a reflection on her lost friend:
"...she said every voice is needed. / Every voice cries out in its own way-- "

The grief the poet expresses in these lines cuts both ways, because the beauty of the image intensifies the loss. Until you've tried to do this yourself, you may not realize this too is an impossible task.
Obong Obong
Warning: personal opinion

As a technical piece, this book was fine. It has no spelling errors, typeset changes, or missing pages. It was exactly as described. It is a slim paperback, easy to hold, average paper quality.

As poetry, it was nauseatingly Postmodern. Be prepared to be lost unless you have read the exact same texts as the author herself. Obtuse, repetitive imagery of a "screen" to follow. Narcissistic introspection, of interest to no one but the person who wrote it.