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eBook Constantine P. Cavafy -- Poems ePub

eBook Constantine P. Cavafy -- Poems ePub

by Constantine P. Cavafy,Manolis,George Amabile

  • ISBN: 0981073514
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Constantine P. Cavafy,Manolis,George Amabile
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Libros Libertad (December 3, 2008)
  • Pages: 240
  • ePub book: 1823 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1865 kb
  • Other: doc lrf txt rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 687

Description

This voice, unlike that of fellow Greek poets George Seferis or Yiannis Ritsos, has the prophetic clarity of Homer, Rumi, Blake, or post-Beatles John Lennon.

To get the free app, enter your mobile phone number. or. Download to your computer. This voice, unlike that of fellow Greek poets George Seferis or Yiannis Ritsos, has the prophetic clarity of Homer, Rumi, Blake, or post-Beatles John Lennon. At times he does employ irony to poke fun at human folly.

Constantine P. Cavafy. Constantine P. Cavafy, along with a few other twentieth century Greek poets such as George Seferis, Odysseus Elytis, Yiannis Ritsos, Kostis Palamas and Andreas Kalvos, established the revival of Greek poetry both in Greece and abroad.

Constantine Peter Cavafy (/kəˈvɑːfi/; also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis; Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Π. Καβάφης ; April 29 (April 17, OS), 1863 – April 29, 1933) was an Egyptiot Greek poet, journalist and civil servant

Constantine Peter Cavafy (/kəˈvɑːfi/; also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis; Greek: Κωνσταντίνος Π. Καβάφης ; April 29 (April 17, OS), 1863 – April 29, 1933) was an Egyptiot Greek poet, journalist and civil servant. His consciously individual style earned him a place among the most important figures not only in Greek poetry, but in Western poetry as well.

Read "Constantine P. Books related to Constantine P.

Poems by Constantine P Cavafy. All translations are by: George Barbanis . A Greek poet, born on 29th April 1863 and died on 29th April 1933, published only about 200 privately printed poems. Cavafy has come in recent years. In book form Cavafy's poems were first published without dates before World War II and reprinted in 1949. PIIMATA (The Poems of Constantine P. Cavafy) appeared posthumously in 1935 in Alexandria. Cavafy died on April 29, 1933 in Alexandria. Nowadays the cafés that the poet frequented on the Rue Misalla (now Safiya Zaghlul) have been largely replaced by shops. Cavafy

Constantine P. 1863 - 1933/Greek Constantine P. Cavafy, also known as Konstantin or Konstantinos Petrou Kavafis, or Kavaphes (Greek Κωνσταντίνος Π. Καβάφης) was a renowned modern Greek poet who lived in Alexandria and worked as a journalist and civil servant. Popular A-Z. Cavafy: Collected Poems. Lockert Library of Poetry in Translation) by Constantine P. Even if you cannot shape your life as you want it, at least try this as much as you can; do not debase it in excessive contact with the world, in the excessive movements and talk. Cavafy's biography and life story The American poet Mark Doty's book My Alexandria uses the place and imagery of Cavafy to create a comparable contemporary landscape. Cavafy's biography and life story. The American poet Mark Doty's book My Alexandria uses the place and imagery of Cavafy to create a comparable contemporary landscape. The Canadian poet and singer-songwriter Leonard Cohen memorably transformed Cavafy's poem "The God Abandons Antony," based on Mark Antony's loss of the city of Alexandria and his empire, into "Alexandra Leaving," a song around lost love. Cavafy's Works

Cavafy remained in Constantinople with his mother until 1885; many of his brothers had returned to Alexandria

Cavafy remained in Constantinople with his mother until 1885; many of his brothers had returned to Alexandria. At this time, Cavafy-a teenager-was writing poems, preparing for a career, and discovering the homosexual orientation that would inform much of his later poetry. Before Time Could Change Them: The Complete Poems of Constantine P. Cavafy, translated, introduction, notes by Theoharis Constantine Theoharis, Harcourt (New York, NY), 2001. Cavafy, translated by . Cafavy, Ikaros (Athens), 2003. I’ve Gazed So Much, translated by George Economou, Stop Press (London), 2003.

Start by marking Constantine P. Cavafy – Poems as Want to Read . Manolis (Translator). Cavafy – Poems as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Translations, like everything else, wear out over time, as language, and those who read or use it, change. With a poet like Cavafy, who was so precisely tuned to the idiom of his peers, it is even more important to update the English versions of his poems frequently, so that they have the same immediate resonance with the times as the originals had with their time. This is, of course, an impossible task. There is no single word, much less any phrase, that has exactly the same weight and hierarchy of primary and secondary meanings in another language. Add to that the differences in sound patterns and rhythmic signatures or emphases, and it becomes clear that the best one can do is to approximate, sometimes by straying from the awkwardness of literal, dictionary definitions, the poetic effects of the original poems. Robert Lowell called his attempts "Imitations" and I think that the ambition and humility of that designation makes it a more or less accurate label for what is presented here, English versions of a celebrated body of work that could never have been written in English, much less in Canadian English with our vastly different history and culture, different even from the English that evolved in Britain over many centuries. Certainly there are problematics that have remained unresolved, and occasional passages of unavoidable clumsiness, but we have tried to approximate both Cavafy's intimate, precise sense of idiomatic speech, and his consummate ear for traditional forms revitalized by the Demotic Greek of Alexandria. If we haven't fully succeeded, our hope is that something of the poet's distinctive genius and skill remains, and remains accessible to our readers, if only as a trace element here and there, or in the cumulative force of the book as a whole.

Comments

Xtani Xtani
I've read some much more beautiful translations of his work from Greek to English. This one is definitely not my favorite, the translation is just so very not pretty.
Ces Ces
Cavafy, one of the best poets of the 20th century,if not the best, up there with the likes of Neruda. Bearing in mind this guy didn't even publish his work.