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eBook Look We Have Coming to Dover! ePub

eBook Look We Have Coming to Dover! ePub

by Daljit Nagra

  • ISBN: 0571231225
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Daljit Nagra
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Faber and Faber; Main edition (February 1, 2007)
  • Pages: 64
  • ePub book: 1128 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1624 kb
  • Other: mobi doc txt lit
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 870

Description

Matthew Arnold, ‘Dover Beach’. Swarms of us, grafting in the black within shot of the moon’s spotlight, banking on the miracle of sun – span its rainbow, passport us to life.

Matthew Arnold, ‘Dover Beach’. Stowed in the sea to invade the lash alfresco of a diesel-breeze ratcheting speed into the tide, with brunt gobfuls of surf phlegmed by cushy come-and-go tourists prow’d on the cruisers, lording the ministered waves. Only then can it be human to hoick ourselves, bare-faced for the clear.

Daljit Nagra's sparkling debut, Look We Have Coming to Dover!, introduces a fresh voice, says Sarah Crown. Yet such is the case for Daljit Nagra, whose first full-length collection was greeted with a slew of interviews, articles and broadcast appearances when it was published earlier this month, rather than the customary deafening silence. More remarkable still is that the poems live up to the hype.

Daljit Nagra FRSL (born 1966) is a British poet whose debut collection, Look We Have Coming to Dover! – a title alluding to W. H. Auden's Look, Stranger!, D. Lawrence's Look! We Have Come Through! and by epigraph also to Matthew Arnold&a. Lawrence's Look! We Have Come Through! and by epigraph also to Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach" – was published by Faber in February 2007.

Society and Culture: ‘Look We Have Coming to Dover!’ clearly addresses many societal ideas and fears regarding immigration and cultures that are different or unfamiliar. Identity: British identity is explored through various iconic images and well known references, but this idea of identity is also increasingly morphed by additional cultural identities.

There are a few important themes in ‘Look We Have Coming to Dover!,’ but the most prominent are identity and society. They can be seen from the start with the contrast between the arrival of the immigrant and the presence of the tourists

There are a few important themes in ‘Look We Have Coming to Dover!,’ but the most prominent are identity and society. They can be seen from the start with the contrast between the arrival of the immigrant and the presence of the tourists. The draw of English society is also present throughout

In ‘Dover Beach’ the surrounding sea is presented as being beautiful, calm and tranquil. Winner of Forward prizes for Best Poem and Best First Collection in 2007, Daljit Nagra is a poet whose parents moved from India to England in the 1960s

In ‘Dover Beach’ the surrounding sea is presented as being beautiful, calm and tranquil. In Nagra’s poem the sea has ‘gobfuls’ in its ‘phlegmed water’; Dover’s cliffs are crumbling and ‘scummed’. The landscape has become polluted by an ugly hostility to immigrants and even the thunder ‘unbladders/yobbish rain’. Consider how the immigrants are described. Stowed in the sea’ and ‘hutched’, they try to go under the radar. Winner of Forward prizes for Best Poem and Best First Collection in 2007, Daljit Nagra is a poet whose parents moved from India to England in the 1960s.

Start by marking Look We Have Coming to Dover! as Want to Read .

Start by marking Look We Have Coming to Dover! as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. I've never really understood why Daljit Nagra should have chosen to submit his poems in the late 1990s-early 2000s to various literary magazines under the plainly ridiculous pseudonym "Khan Singh Kumar" - a mashup of Muslim, Sikh and Hindu subcontinental names.

Taking in its sights Matthew Arnold's 'land of dreams', the collection explores the idealism and reality of a multicultural Britain with wit, intelligence and no small sense of mischief. By turns realist and romantic, these charged and challenging poems never shy from confrontation, but remain, always, touched by a humorous zeal and an appetite for living

Daljit Nagra’s portrayal of immigration in the poem, ‘Look We Have Coming to Dover’, is a rather negative one as he appears to ridicule the perception of immigration through various techniques

Daljit Nagra’s portrayal of immigration in the poem, ‘Look We Have Coming to Dover’, is a rather negative one as he appears to ridicule the perception of immigration through various techniques. From an initial glance one can already look at how the diction connotes with an unpleasant journey of immigration.

Taking in its sights Matthew Arnold's 'land of dreams', the collection explores the idealism and reality of a multicultural Britain with wit, intelligence and no small sense of mischief. Nagra, whose own parents came to England from the Punjab in the 1950s, conjures a jazzed hybrid language to tell stories of aspiration, assimilation, alienation and love, from a stowaway's first footprint on Dover beach to the disenchantment of subsequent generations. By turns realist and romantic, these charged and challenging poems never shy from confrontation, but remain, always, touched by a humorous zeal and an appetite for living.