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eBook Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century ePub

eBook Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century ePub

by Michael Dumanis,Cate Marvin

  • ISBN: 1932511296
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Michael Dumanis,Cate Marvin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Sarabande Books; First Edition edition (January 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 500
  • ePub book: 1401 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1668 kb
  • Other: docx azw lit rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 956

Description

This book reminds me of the Poulin anthology Mike Dumanis is a nice guy who did a terrible job on this anthology. It should have been called "Mike Dumanis' Anthology of His Iowa Friends (and a few others he met at AWP).

This book reminds me of the Poulin anthology. Some of the writers in here are among the most notorious in their generation, the ones that seem to be winning honor after honor, but the book has some surprises as well: interesting poets I read for the first time include Sabrina Mark, Lisa Jarnot, and Julianne Buchsbaum. Mike Dumanis is a nice guy who did a terrible job on this anthology. The most myopic anthology I've ever seen.

Legitimate Dangers book. This groundbreaking anthology offers a broad and representative. Cate Marvin's first book, World's Tallest Disaster, was chosen by Robert Pinksy for the 2000 Kathryn A. Morton Prize and published by Sarabande Books in 2001. In 2002, she received the Kate Tufts Discovery Prize. Her second book of poems, Fragment of the Head of a Queen, was published by Sarabande in August 2007.

Daisy Fried, My Brother Is Getting Arrested Again (University of Pittsburgh Press), a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for poetry. Jack Gilbert, Tough Heaven: Poems of Pittsburgh, Transgressions: Selected Poems.

This groundbreaking anthology offers a broad and representative introduction to some of the most exciting, fresh voices on the contemporary poetry landscape by gathering together generous selections from the work of 85 younger American poets. The poets selected were born after 1960, published their first book within the last 10 years, and have no more than three books published. Some are the recipients of numerous awards, while others, who are making their first appearance, are quickly making significant contributions to poetry.

Dumanis, Michael, Doty, Mark, Marvin, Cate. Assembled Product Dimensions (L x W x H). 6 x . 2 x . 0 Inches.

This week, they’re trading journal entries about the process.

Cate Marvin’s first book, World’s Tallest Disaster, was chosen by Robert Pinsky for the 2000 Kathryn A. . Morton Prize and published by Sarabande Books in 2001 n 2002, she received the Kate Tufts Discovery Prize. Her second book of poems, Fragment of the Head of a Queen, for which she received a Whiting Award, was published by Sarabande in 2007. Marvin teaches poetry writing in Lesley University’s Low-Residency .

He taught at New York University, The New School, the University of Houston, St. Mary's College of California, and . Mary's College of California, and University of California, Berkeley. He lives in San Francisco and is the brother of American musician and songwriter Michael Zapruder, and is the guitarist in the American band The Figments. In 2011, he was a Guggenheim Fellow. He had a Lannan Foundation Residency in Marfa, Texas. He won the May Sarton prize, American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Items related to Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New . Marvin's first book, World's Tallest Disaster, was awarded the 2000 Kathryn A. Morton Prize by Robert Pinksy (Sarabande 2001).

Items related to Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century. Legitimate Dangers: American Poets of the New Century. ISBN 13: 9781932511291. In 2002, she received the Kate Tufts Discovery Award.

Rare book

Comments

Dreladred Dreladred
Just over six years since this was published, so I hauled it down again. Whether it will be seen as generation-defining a generation from now, who knows, but at this point I would say Marvin & Dumanis made some awfully good calls -- people whose work since this anthology has been very strong. Srikanth Reddy, Joanna Klink, Matthew Zapruder, Arielle Greenberg, Julianne Spahr, Joshua Beckmann, Ben Doyle, Noelle Kocot--not to forget my own chief favorite, G. C. Waldrep. Even one of the dedicatees is freshly acclaimed; Amber Dermont is the author of novel-of-the-season The Starboard Sea. With 85 poets I suppose one is bound to hit a few winners, but I would say their batting average is looking very handsome at the moment.
Peles Peles
Great Condition!
Mitynarit Mitynarit
Truly, someone coming to American poetry through this anthology will be more confused than illuminated by these selections; although there are,of course, some good poets and poems here, at the same time there's no discernment or maturity of taste; a great deal of silliness and wordplay and indulgence from young poets who have not found their subject matter, nor the honesty and the directness,the force, to make something called a poem. Too many of these poems are merely word-machines, language for its own sake, trivial calesthenics. A beginning poet could squander years imitating these models. Look elsewhere!
Jare Jare
This book reminds me of the Poulin anthology. It seems to start where the Poulin leaves off, providing a look at the poets much too young and new to be included in any of Poulin's editions. Some of the writers in here are among the most notorious in their generation, the ones that seem to be winning honor after honor, but the book has some surprises as well: interesting poets I read for the first time include Sabrina Mark, Lisa Jarnot, and Julianne Buchsbaum. A lot of the bigger names too: Nick Flynn, Kevn Young, Natasha Trethewey. Some surprise omissions, but that's true of all anthologies. All in all, a pretty good intro to the poets who are probably well-known to many of their peers but not to us older folk. Definitely has more experimental poems than a lot of the big anthologies, but there's also a surprising number of writers using meter.
snowball snowball
"How does one communicate the intersection of life and the imagination"? By asking one's friends to communicate it, that's how! It's true, much of this line up reads like a veritable who's who of literary contest cheating and quid pro quo poets--people adept at schmoozing, not necessarily writing. There are some good ones in the bunch. Still, I must concur with Jimmy (below)--this book's net was not cast so wide, and hit mostly the AWP careerists.

What's most fun about this book are bound to be the reviews. Take the bottom of this list, for starters: "Oregon Poet", in his or her sole Amazon review, comes out in praise of Andrew Feld and Pimone Triplett. Feld and Triplett are married poets residing in Oregon. Feld's sole book was the result of a contest win--a contest judged by his wife's coworker! Is this the same Amazon reviewer who penned the Best Younger Poets list, a list that included, exclusively, Feld, Feld's classmates, and those who are married to Feld? My guess is yes.

But what do I know? I'm just a kid.
Rolling Flipper Rolling Flipper
It should come as no surprise that a book called Legitimate Dangers would have a somewhat volatile effect. The world of poetry can often be a craven, petty, and divisive little industry, where people are more interested in attacking a new anthology than editing their own or actually writing a few good poems themselves. As someone who isn't part of any poetry coterie or underworld but who consumes as many books of poetry a year as I can stomach, I actually purchased this anthology and read it.

Many of the poems in here are fantastic. While the writers assembled have diverse aesthetic preferences (from the jazzy to the more formal, from the punky and edgy to the eloquent and mellifluous), for the most part, the poems themselves are meditative, lush, unsettling, and ambitious. Why pick on this particular anthology of younger poets and not another one? Have you read the book or are you merely disappointed that your friend's name isn't on the table of contents? William James said, "A great many people think they are thinking when they are merely rearranging their prejudices." How many other anthologies are out there who are equally eager to introduce the general readership to the avant-garde stylings of Joshua Beckman, Christine Hume, Lisa Jarnot, and Joyelle McSweeney and to the clearly more traditional poems of Rick Barot, Spencer Reece, and Greg Williamson in the same volume?

This is not a comprehensive, democratic anthology, and it shouldn't be--it's already 500 pages long for crying out loud. If you read this book, chances are you'll discover some poems you like more than others. I did. That's true of any collection. This one happens to be filled to the brim with beautiful new writing. Is that such a bad thing?
Qwert Qwert
Mike Dumanis is a nice guy who did a terrible job on this anthology. It should have been called "Mike Dumanis' Anthology of His Iowa Friends (and a few others he met at AWP)." The most myopic anthology I've ever seen.