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eBook Chinese Whispers: Poems ePub

eBook Chinese Whispers: Poems ePub

by John Ashbery

  • ISBN: 0374122571
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: John Ashbery
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar, Straus and Giroux; 1 edition (October 22, 2002)
  • Pages: 112
  • ePub book: 1419 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1801 kb
  • Other: doc mobi txt lit
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 172

Description

But unlike a printed book, which is stable, an ebook is a shape-shifter

But unlike a printed book, which is stable, an ebook is a shape-shifter. Electronic type may be reflowed across a galaxy of applications and interfaces, across a variety of screens, from phone to tablet to computer.

Chinese Whispers - by John Ashbery

Chinese Whispers - by John Ashbery  . And in a little while we broke under the strain: suppurations ad nauseam, the wanting to be taller, though it‘s simply about being mysterious, . not taller, like any tree in any forest. Mute, the pancake describes you.

The child's game Chinese Whispers, known in America as Telephone, is an exercise in transforming the recognizable into something beautifully strange.

John Ashbery, "Chinese Whispers" from Chinese Whispers. Reprinted by permission of Georges Borchardt, Inc. Source: Chinese Whispers (Farrar Straus and Giroux, 2001). More About this Poem. More Poems by John Ashbery.

I was quietly reading the margin when the doves fell, it was blue outside. Perhaps in a moment, he said. The moment never came. Other people came and dropped off their résumés. I wasn’t being idle, exactly. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

John Lawrence Ashbery (July 28, 1927 – September 3, 2017) was an American poet and art critic. Ashbery is considered the most influential poet of his time

John Lawrence Ashbery (July 28, 1927 – September 3, 2017) was an American poet and art critic. Ashbery is considered the most influential poet of his time.

And in a little while we broke under the strain: suppurations ad nauseam, the wanting to be taller

And in a little while we broke under the strain: suppurations ad nauseam, the wanting to be taller, though it‘s simply about being mysterious, . It had tiny roman numerals embedded in its rim.

Chinese whispers : poems. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. You turn to your neighbour and cup your hand and say into his ear what you've heard. He does the same to a girl on his right. With each repetition the message gets a little further from the original intention. But as the intention recedes.

Chinese Whispers is Ashbery's 20th collection of verse, comprising 65 poems. The title poem of Chinese Whispers begins by cross-breeding two traditions: European surrealist painting and American diner cuisine. Some are more nonsensical than others. Ashbery is not usually so rhyme-led. Cumulatively, the poem achieves a certain catchy metrical verve - but Dr Seuss has nothing to worry about. It imagines an object banally reminiscent of Salvador Dali's floppy watches: "It had tiny Roman numerals embedded in its ri. It was a pancake clock.

Chinese Whispers is the British name of a game called Telephone in America. According to a certain "Professor Hoffmann" in his book Drawing Room Amusements (1879), "the participants are arranged in a circle, and the first player whispers a story or message to the next player, and so on round the circle. The original story is then compared with the final version, which has often changed beyond recognition.""Chinese Whispers" is also the superb title poem in this new collection of sixty-three poems by John Ashbery. In these works, as perhaps in much poetry, the verbal nucleus that is the original incitement toward a poem undergoes twists and modulations before arriving at its final form. The changes are caused not by careless listening to the speech of others, but by endlessly proliferating trains of ideas that a single word or phrase ignites in the poet's mind. These alter the face of the poem even as they contribute to it and become part of its fabric. As in a sea change the poem has been transformed, often into "something rich and strange," but the strangeness is that of thought being opened up, like a geode, to reveal unexpected facets of meaning.John Ashbery has been called "America's greatest living poet" by Harold Bloom. Now in his seventy-fifth year, he continues to write poetry that is dazzlingly inventive and original.

Comments

Reighbyra Reighbyra
An underrated volume by Ashbery. Extremely playful poems. The book is something to be experienced, not so much memorized.
Ungall Ungall
I have read Ashbery's first books, such as: Some Trees, and The Double Dream of Spring, Houseboat Days, and also much of the Selected Poems, and I think this latest book, Chinese Whispers, is comparable to his best work.
As I read Chinese Whispers, and then reread it, I found how it is similar to the variation found in an anthology. The Best American Poetry 2003 contains all kinds of forms and tones, etc. and Ashbery, in C. W. takes on this kind of task, the task of not settling in a rhythm, to keep moving. Even toward the winter of his career, Ashbery is still searching; he seems to still be searching like a beginning poet, yet a new poet with a strong voice.
Togar Togar
The mild decline of a great talent continues. Johnny hasn't been on point since Wakefulness, but we can thank somebody that this collection, however mediocre, still easily trumps the ghastly "...Rain". Please--I adore Ashbery, so no hot-dung tossing. There are some great pieces in this latest: "Little Sick Poem", "Half-Kiss'd", the second to last poem whose title escapes me...
...go to the library, but don't buy the thing unless you're compiling a comprehensive collection. A lot of blubber, filler.
I'd give it 2.5 stars, if I could--the last half gold.
Error parents Error parents
Before reading this glittering failure, I desperately feared for the future of poetry in this country; but seeing as nothing could possibly be worse than this, my fears are suddenly abated. Dear post-post-modern reader, brace yourself for the eloquent, rightfully loaded death sentence of the New York School of American poetry (now at least we have a perfectly valid excuse to plan its funeral and move on to new and better things!). At best, this centerless literary labyrinth, alive with heartless, overwrought, sharp-toothed little imps, represents a disgracefully grandiose attempt to self-promote and to further beat the already beaten-to-death poetics of the abstract expressionists, for the sole benefit of the American, eurocentric, cigar-smoking literati and its smug conformist aplomb. This is writing for the sake of seeming clever (much like this arguably unfair review), but it is taken to the most obnoxious level possible, with highly referential super-high brow humor, tensionless line breaks, tricky word riddles that seem to smirk snobbishly at you as you read; and, worst of all, there is a profound absence of emotional impact. The prose pieces are only slightly more readable. In fact, the best thing about this book is the cover, a storm of sharp, yellow ,leaf-like forms ripping into a black background - very cool. Anyway, back to the heart of the matter; if you have money to burn, don't waste it on this. Go buy a pack of gum and an issue of Hustler instead. If you're an Ashbery fan, plunge into the beautifully weird cover art and think fondly of his past work, but don't dare open the book...bad idea.