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eBook Leaves of Grass ePub

eBook Leaves of Grass ePub

by Walt Whitman

  • ISBN: 1586632108
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Walt Whitman
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Metro Books (April 1, 2001)
  • Pages: 512
  • ePub book: 1500 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1400 kb
  • Other: rtf txt lrf lrf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 279

Description

as, first, I here and now Signing for Soul and Body, set to them my name, Walt Whitman.

Come, said my soul, Such verses for my Body let us write, (for we are one,) That should I after return, Or, long, long hence, in other spheres, There to some group of mates the chants resuming, (Tallying Earth's soil, trees, winds, tumultuous waves,) Ever with pleas'd smile I may keep on, Ever and ever yet the verses owning-. as, first, I here and now Signing for Soul and Body, set to them my name, Walt Whitman. One's-self I sing, a simple separate person, Yet utter the word Democratic, the word En-Masse.

Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892)

Leaves of Grass is a poetry collection by the American poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892).

Leaves of Grass, first published in 1855, contained twelve long untitled poems, but Whitman continued to expand it throughout his life. As Ralph Waldo Emerson wrote to him: "I am very happy in reading, as great power makes us happy.

O take my hand Walt Whitman! O tan-faced prairie-boy . Leaves of Grass –Whitman.

O take my hand Walt Whitman! O tan-faced prairie-boy, O to make the most jubilant song! . Rise O Days from Your Fathomless Deeps. Come, said my soul, Such verses for my Body let us write, (for we are one,) That should I after return, Or, long, long hence, in other spheres, There to some group of mates the chants resuming, (Tallying Earth’s soil, trees, winds, tumultuous waves,) Ever with pleas’d smile I may keep on, Ever and ever yet the verses owning-as, first, I here and now Signing for Soul and Body, set to them my name, Walt Whitman. 8.

Leaves Of Grass" is his one book

Leaves Of Grass" is his one book. First published in 1855 with only twelve poems, it was greeted by Ralph Waldo Emerson as "the wonderful gift. the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed. Over the course of Whitman's life, the book reappeared in many versions, expanded and transformed as the author's experiences and the nation's history changed and grew. Whitman's ambition was to creates something uniquely American. In that he succeeded. His poems have been woven into the very fabric of the American character.

The Modern Man! whom most of us are afraid to approach in poetry, or from any high standpoint at all,-Walt Whitman has resolutely faced him, and sounded the hopes and fears of his potential being. The foregoing passage from "Inscriptions," poems introductory to the main body of the Leaves of Grass, may be called indeed the key-note of Walt Whitman's unusual music. Struck thus at the outset, it will be found dominant throughout the book; with it sounding insistently in our ears we shall not be likely to mistake the great intention of this new poetry.

In Leaves of Grass Walt Whitman sings nature and his symbiosis with America, he sings the universe and his awareness of it all, but above all he sings the people and their quest for individuality and immortality. The proof of a poet is that his country absorbs him as affectionately as he has absorbed i.

Walt Whitman was a visionary, a tolerant and kind man, who spoke out about injustices and . Библиографические данные.

Walt Whitman was a visionary, a tolerant and kind man, who spoke out about injustices and did not allow himself to conform. Looking into the soul of human motivation and reaction, he purposefully. Whitman would go on adding to it and revising it for the rest of his life. Whitman's poetry slowly achieved a wide readership in America and in England. He was praised by Swinburne and Tennyson, and visited by Oscar Wilde.

Librivox recording of Leaves of Grass, by Walt Whitman. When the book was first published, Whitman sent a copy to Emerson, whose praiseful letter of response helped launch the book to success. Read in English by Librivox volunteers. Whitman's hero, Abraham Lincoln, read and enjoyed an early version of Leaves of Grass. Despite such high recommendations, Whitman faced charges of obscenity and immorality for his work, but this only led to increased popularity of the book.

Листья травы Leaves of grass, By Walt Whitman нет данных:Washington, 1872:By Walt Whitman Воспроизведено в. .

Листья травы Leaves of grass, By Walt Whitman нет данных:Washington, 1872:By Walt Whitman Воспроизведено в оригинальной авторской орфографии издания 1872 года. American poet whose great work Leaves of Grass (first published 1855), written in unconventional meter and rhyme, celebrates the self, death as a process of life, universal brotherhood, and the greatness of democracy and the United States. Источник: Whitman,Walt. Другие книги схожей тематики: Автор.

This richly illustrated edition presents a selection of Whitman's greatest and most beautiful lyrics, from sprawling masterpieces like "Song of Myself" to little-known gems like "Fancies at Navesink." With poems drawn from each of the "clusters" with which Whitman brought structure and coherence to his work, this volume follows the ordering established by the poet for the so-called "Death-Bed Edition" (1891-92) of Leaves of Grass. Also included are four of Whitman's superbly poetic essays, among them the landmark preface to the first edition of Leaves of Grass. Enhanced by treasures from the archives of the New York Public Library, including handwritten poems and letters and a stunning array of portraits and illustrations, this Collector's Edition allows readers a rare opportunity to experience the poet and his world.

Comments

Kaghma Kaghma
I am very happy that inexpensive versions of Leaves of Grass are available again. I have purchased eight different versions to compare. Many are very poorly put together - almost like scanned versions simply plopped into a word processor and uploaded to Amazon - and selling for $10 - $1. What I find most fascinating is this one - by Martino Fine Books (listed as Leaves of Grass ; {exact Facsimile of the 1855 Edition] - it is very fine, and is an exact facsimile. I love holding it and looking at it as close to the original 1855 edition as humanly possible. The only caveat is the cover - which features the older Walt, who had published six more versions by the time the cover photo was taken. No matter, the inside is what's important. Another one I bought that I recommend is from cholla needles press (listed as Leaves of Grass: 1855) - they use a facsimile of the original cover, and have made the choice to clean up the line breaks for readability purposes. The cholla edition is easy to sit down and read, the martino edition is beautiful to look at. The good news is I bought them both for less than $10 and find that reasonable enough to give them both to friends and relatives as gifts this year.
Beazekelv Beazekelv
Kindle Buyer Beware! If you think you are buying the Library of America edition (which links to this Kindle version on the Amazon page) you are not. This is a completely different version. If you are looking, specifically, for the First Edition (1855) of Leaves of Grass - which is given prominence of place in the Library of America edition -- you will not find it here. As for the rest of the material, it may well be fine but it is NOT the Library of America -- a series renowned for its editorial care. It is, in fact, published by Heritage Illustrated Publishing from materials in the public domain. No essay by Justin Kaplan, no page numbers, and notably ugly typesetting. There are better Kindle general editions of Whitman's poetry for less (Bantam Classics, for instance). Amazon misleads its customers by putting this generic edition on the same page as the scholar-worthy Library version of which it claims to be a reproduction.
LoboThommy LoboThommy
I am torn on my reaction to Whitman's magnum opus-- its themes and words will remain unforgettable, but boy how I hated reading this plodding rambling slog of a book.

Whitman's poems catalog his transcendentalism-inspired view of... everything. From scenes across the world, with particular focus on America, to anecdotes of dying soldiers and copulating couples, Whitman emphasizes the interconnectedness of humanity and nature.

While Whitman's enthusiasm is infectious, he lacks brevity. He repeats his philosophy like a club over the head. The final product could've been cut in half and still have gotten across the message.

But darn if there aren't moments of beauty. Particularly in the later poems which were added in his later years, Whitman tempers his enthusiasm with more brief, succinct, thoughtful, and hopeful words in the face of impending death. And I think that is the best occasion for Whitman's leaves: when one needs comfort that there is indestructible purpose and beauty in every human's life.
playboy playboy
This review is only for the Wisehouse Classics edition. There are a number of typographical errors within the book. For instance, the word "of" is exchanged for the word "or" a number of times in "Song of Myself," altering the meaning of certain lines significantly.

It's extremely unfortunate that Amazon has combined the reviews for so many different editions of this and other books. While they may sell more books, it makes it very difficult for customers to find a good edition to buy, and it makes me much less likely to buy from Amazon in the future.
Wymefw Wymefw
I didn't appreciate the works of Walt Whitman in high school. When I entered college and took my American Lit classes, I still had my reservations as nothing really resonated with me. It wasn't until I was in my 30s that started to "get it" and appreciate the words Whitman committed to paper that transcend time.

"The Dead Poet's Society" did an excellent job of capturing the emotion behind "Captain Oh My Captain", which has come to be one of Whitman's most famous and moving pieces of poetry. My favorite over time has become "To Think of Time."

To think of time—of all that retrospection!
To think of today, and the ages continued henceforward!

Have you guess’d you yourself would not continue?
Have you dreaded these earth-beetles?
Have you fear’d the future would be nothing to you?

Is today nothing? Is the beginningless past nothing?
If the future is nothing, they are just as surely nothing.

Although Whitman wrote of life, he also embraced the inevitable concept of death. The words above come form one of the many poignant stanzas from this great "death" poem that reminds us that there is no need to dread the inevitable and live.
Jark Jark
This is the one to buy when you want everything Walt Whitman had published as "Leaves of Grass." So many versions -- including, I'm sorry to say, the expensive leather-clad "heirloom" editions -- leave out the homoerotic 'Calamus' book and so many other instances of sexuality that they emerge less than half the full page count.