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eBook The 100 Best Poems of All Time ePub

eBook The 100 Best Poems of All Time ePub

by Leslie Pockell

  • ISBN: 0446579076
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Leslie Pockell
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Grand Central Publishing (2005)
  • ePub book: 1586 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1299 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf mbr docx
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 196

Description

There are 100 poets featured in this book. Whether you are a hopeless romantic or enjoy thinking about the many aspects of love, this book has much to offer.

" and while they may not live up to the title's hyperbole, they do satisfy the teaser's terms. There are 100 poets featured in this book. I can almost guarantee you will find 5 poems to adore, 10 you want to read again and again and 20 new poets you are happy to have found.

Start by marking The 100 Best Poems of All Time as Want to Read .

Start by marking The 100 Best Poems of All Time as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Just how would one presume to pick the best from such an incredible array? However, the choices made really are very good although they reflect the artistry of the translator nearly as much as the original poet.

The 100 Best Poems of All Time. The 13 Best Horror Stories of All Time. As with this book’s predecessor, The 100 Best Poems of All Time, our primary objective in assembling these works has been to provide a small, easily portable volume that would contain the essential works that most readers would expect to find in a book of this kind, along with a few discoveries. Love poetry down the years seems to have been written along a spectrum ranging from idealistic romanticism to passionate sensuality, and in this collection we have gathered what we feel.

Top 100 best and all time famous and most popular poems in english literature. A Birthday Poem by Ted Kooser. A Dream Within A Dream by Edgar Allan Poe. A Girl by Ezra Pound. A Poet To His Beloved by William Butler Yeats. A Poison Tree by William Blake. A pretty a day by E. E. Cummings.

Pockell compiled this collection "to provide a small, easily portable volume that would contain the essential works that most readers would expect to find in a book .

Pockell compiled this collection "to provide a small, easily portable volume that would contain the essential works that most readers would expect to find in a book of the best poems. Пользовательский отзыв - luckysoldier - Overstock. Adrienne Avila is the co-author of "Everything I've Learned. Библиографические данные. The 100 Best Love Poems of All Time.

The 100 Best Love Poems of All Time. Here, in one compact volume, is a greatest hits collection of the 100 bets love poems ever written by 100 of the world's greatest poets. This essential anthology is ideal for the romantic-and will inspire any cynic. The poets included range throughout the history of world literature: from the Classics (Sappho, Catullus) and Renaissance (Shakespeare, Donne, Dante) to the Romantics (Shelly, Keats, Wordsworth) and 20th century giants (Frost, Lorca, Graves), right down to the present day (Viorst, Patchen, Neruda).

Leslie Pockell's collection brought back memories from school, church, college, previous poetry . But the unmitigated gall of the title actually chosen-The 100 Best Poems of All Time-makes for a little fun, and probably will increase the sales of the book.

Leslie Pockell's collection brought back memories from school, church, college, previous poetry collections and moments in history not soon to be forgotten. Who could ever forget the first time they heard "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats or "A Visit from St. Nicholas" by Clement Clarke Moore. As Pockell writes in the short Introduction, "Well, at least we attracted your attention.

Here, in one compact volume, is a greatest hits collection of the 100 bets love poems ever written by 100 of the world's . More by Leslie Pockell. Include any personal information. Mention spoilers or the book's price.

Here, in one compact volume, is a greatest hits collection of the 100 bets love poems ever written by 100 of the world's greatest poets. 100 Poems to Lift Your Spirits.

Special Sales Edition. "Verses to move you, lines you'll love, from old favorites to modern classic, here are" From front cover

Comments

Perius Perius
Gave this to my daughter for Christmas and she loved it! Will be borrowing it soon! ????????
Lbe Lbe
Not my favorites.
Vispel Vispel
Leslie Pockell's collection brought back memories from school, church, college, previous poetry collections and moments in history not soon to be forgotten. Who could ever forget the first time they heard "Ode on a Grecian Urn" by John Keats or "A Visit from St. Nicholas" by Clement Clarke Moore. These are almost engrained in our culture, as much as "Amazing Grace" by John Newton and "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe.

Maya Angelou's "Still I Rise" sings from the page:

"Just like moons and like suns,

With the certainty of tides,

Just like hopes springing high,

Still I'll rise.

Did you want to see me broken?

Bowed head and lowered eyes?

Shoulders falling down like teardrops.

Weakened by my soulful cries."

Many of the poems in this collection carry with them this similar fire, this beautiful tenacity and statement of individuality within a complex world where poets often reject the daily call to conform, listening instead to their own heart's desire.

"I'll walk where my own nature would be leading--

It vexes me to choose another guide--

Where the gray flocks in ferny glens are feeding,

Where the wild wind blows on the mountainside."

~ Emily Bronte's "Often Rebuked, Yet Always Back Returning"

As I was reading, I could not help but hear the beautiful singing in many poems, now part of our heritage in the American songbook. Then there is another type of singing, the singing of words as they create fascinating rhythms as displayed in "The Highwayman" by Alfred Noyes. "This Land Is Your Land" by Woody Guthrie should literally sing to you from the page as does Julia Ward Howe's poem.

Poems by William Shakespeare, John Donne, Li Po, Sappho, Oscar Wilde, Rainer Maria Rilke, Rabindranath Tagore, Robert Browning, Emily Bronte, Thomas Gray, Omar Khayyam, Virgil, Catullus, William Wordsworth, Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Elizabeth Barrett Browning all dance on the same stage.

Some of my all-time favorites also appear:

Sea Fever by John Masefield

The love Song of J. Alred Prufrock by T.S. Eliot

Fog by Carl Sandburg

Lake Isle of Innisfree by William Butler Yeats

To His Coy Mistress by Andrew Marvell

Tyger! Tyger! By William Blake

Ozymandia by Percy Bysshe Shelley

She Walks in Beauty by Lord Byron

Ulysses by Alfred, Lord Tennyson

The Jabberwocky by Lewis Carroll

Stopping by the Woods on a Snowy Evening by Robert Frost

"Poetry" by Pablo Neruda captures some of the energy and fusion in this book:

"And I, infinitesimal being,

drunk with the great starry

void,

likeness, image of

mystery,

felt myself a pure part

of the abyss,

I wheeled with the stars,

my heart broke loose on the wind."

~The Rebecca Review
Felolv Felolv
I disagree with the assumption that they are 100 of the best poems ever written but they are certainly worthy of review. I found the selection interesting.
Risa Risa
What this little book might have been called in manuscript was something like "100 Representative Poems of 100 of the Most Popular Poets of All Time." Not a bad title, and it is consistent with editor Leslie Pockell's popular choices and her[?] intent to include no more than one poem by any poet. But the unmitigated gall of the title actually chosen--The 100 Best Poems of All Time--makes for a little fun, and probably will increase the sales of the book. As Pockell writes in the short Introduction, "Well, at least we attracted your attention."
You did. And for fun I am responding with some reaction to the selections. But first I should mention Pockell's criteria for the selections. The book needed to be short, a mix of "high art" and "popular culture" was desired, and the selections ought to be "inclined toward poetry that is best appreciated when recited or read aloud." Fair enough. And for the most part I think Pockell did an admirable job.
The excellent choices include, the King James version of the Twenty-Third Psalm, Poe's "The Raven," Shakespeare's "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day?" (although it seems weird to select just one of his sonnets; I prefer "That time of year thou mayst in me behold" or "Let me not to the marriage of true minds"), Donne's "Go and Catch a Falling Star," Shelley's "Ozymandias," Keat's "Ode on a Grecian Urn" (although again, how to choose just one!) Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach," Housman's "When I Was One-and-Twenty," Frost's "Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening," (ditto the last two asides), Eliot's "...Prufrock," etc.
Poor selections include, "The Battle Hymn of the Republic" (a stirring song, but a "best" poem?), Basho's "An Old Pond" (there are better English renditions than the one given, for example, "In the old stone pool/a frogjump:/splishhhh." Pockell gives, "Old pond-/A frog leaps in-/Water's sound."; and Basho wrote many better haiku), "Casey at the Bat" (uh...never mind), and several others that I fear to name. Also to choose out of all of Alexander Pope's work, his epigram about the dog at Kew, seems almost anti-poetic.
A howler is "Ancient Music" by Ezra Pound. If Pockell wanted to show the less than charming side of Pound, perhaps Pound's "The Garden" which includes the line, "...the filthy, sturdy, unkillable infants of the very poor" might have been presented. (Then again, perhaps not.)
A creative choice is e e cummings's "Buffalo Bill's," which reflects not only cummings's love of typographical form, but his playful wit along with his famous word play and his often missed irony. (The typographical form of the poem represents a tomahawk: "[H]ow...[DO] you like your blueeyed boy[,] Mister Death"?)
Langston Hughes's "Harlem" ("What happens to a dream deferred?") is obviously a politically correct choice, and also a very good little poem, but I would have preferred his "Mother to Son" ("Well, son, I'll tell you:/Life for me ain't been no crystal stair...") or the breath-taking simplicity of "Friend." Sylvia Plath's dark and brutal "Daddy" is also PC, but with its inclusion there is no need for Margaret Atwood, a fact for which we can be thankful. The choice from Sappho, with its nice turn from "a god" that sits "beside you" to the poet herself, is of course de rigueur, but a good choice nonetheless.
Pleasant surprises include W. H. Auden's "Funeral Blues," and Pablo Neruda's "Poetry." Some old favorites are Matthew Arnold's "Dover Beach," Wordsworth's "The World Is Too Much with Us," and the powerful "Incident" from Countee Cullen.
It is good that Pockell includes some poetry translated from other languages; however that just makes the presumption of her title all the more absurd. Just how would one presume to pick the best from such an incredible array? However, the choices made really are very good although they reflect the artistry of the translator nearly as much as the original poet. Middle Eastern people might object to the choice of a quatrain from "The Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam" ("The Moving Finger writes...") translated by Edward FitzGerald, which is almost as much English as it is Persian, preferring a more ethnic rendition.
I can't quibble with the poets left out, although missing are John Crow Ransom, Archibald MacLeish, Theodore Roethke, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Lowell, Rita Dove, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, and of course of necessity many others. One of my favorite poems and poet not to appear is "Patterns" by Amy Lowell.
Pockell gives a terse, but felicitous introduction to each poem usually including a word about the poet. But I have one question, who is Leslie Pockell? There is not a biographical word anywhere in the book to give a hint. And should I have used a masculine or a feminine pronoun?
Kirinaya Kirinaya
This book is wonderful! I'm a student, that loves literature and poetry, so I decided to buy this at my local bookstore. I like to collect poetry collections, and this one seemed perfect. As soon as I read the first few poems, I fell in love with it.
Several of my favorite poems are in this book, such as "The Highwayman" by Alred Noyes, "The raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, "Still I rise" by Maya Angelou and also "Lake Isle of Innisfree" by William Butler Yeats. This delightful collection also had my Fifth Grade favorite- "Paul Revere's Ride" by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. I was thrilled.
I also found many new soon-to-be favorites such as "Tyger!Tyger!" by William Blake and "First Fig" by Edna St. Vincent Mallay.

I was a little annoyed when someone who reviewed this book said that it didn't say when it was jsut part of a poem. It does- It says "From" before the title of thepoem, to subtly let the reader know that it's not the whole thing. The reviewer must not have have read this book carefully, if he/she did not catch it.

I would reccommend this book to any lovers of poetry, or even first-timers. It's extra-helpful because of the index of both titles and authors, and also the first line of the poem! It really is a wonderful collection.
Jogas Jogas
This book includes a good sampling of poetry and can easily help you find authors that you may like, and types of poetry.
I liked this so much I have ordered a copy of the book for EACH of my four grandchildren. A really good book to have in the family.