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eBook The Satires (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

eBook The Satires (Oxford World's Classics) ePub

by Niall Rudd,William Barr,Juvenal

  • ISBN: 0199540667
  • Category: Poetry
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Niall Rudd,William Barr,Juvenal
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (August 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 304
  • ePub book: 1294 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1349 kb
  • Other: lrf rtf lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 928

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The Satires (Oxford World. has been added to your Cart. I am not qualified to give an educated opinion about Juvenal or his Satires. Working my way backwards from Patrick and Augustine, I am, only now beginning to touch upon "the classics"

The Satires (Oxford World. Working my way backwards from Patrick and Augustine, I am, only now beginning to touch upon "the classics". I have only now heard of this guy and I am completely BLOWN AWAY!!! How is it possible that he should be able to speak to me so clearly across the ages and remain absolutely current in tone and demeanor? Like Patrick and Augustine, Juvenal speaks largely in the VERY PERSONAL first person singular. That changes everything.

Juvenal Translated by Niall Rudd and With introduction and notes by William Barr. Oxford World's Classics. Juvenal has been seen as a stern moralist and, more recently, as an extravagant wit, and is acclaimed for his vivid description of the scenes which aroused his anger

Juvenal Translated by Niall Rudd and With introduction and notes by William Barr. Juvenal, writing between AD 110 and 130, was one of the greatest satirists of Imperial Rome. His powerful and witty attacks on the vices,. Juvenal has been seen as a stern moralist and, more recently, as an extravagant wit, and is acclaimed for his vivid description of the scenes which aroused his anger. He coined the famous phrase designating people & and anxious for two things; bread and races' (panem et circenses'). Niall Rudd's translation reproduces the original style and metrical effect of Juvenal's hexameters.

Items related to The Satires (Oxford World's Classics). William Barr is at University of Liverpool. Juvenal The Satires (Oxford World's Classics). ISBN 13: 9780192839459. The Satires (Oxford World's Classics). This new translation reproduces the original style and metrical effect of Juvenal's hexameters, while the Introduction and Notes provide literary and historical background to the sixteen satires. About the Author: Niall Rudd is at University of Bristol.

In this new translation of the Satires, Professor Rudd combines textual accuracy with colo. Commonly considered the greatest of Roman satirical poets, Juvenal is the author of sixteen satires of Roman society, notable for their pessimism and ironic humor

In this new translation of the Satires, Professor Rudd combines textual accuracy with colo. Commonly considered the greatest of Roman satirical poets, Juvenal is the author of sixteen satires of Roman society, notable for their pessimism and ironic humor. In this new translation of the Satires, Professor Rudd combines textual accuracy with colorful poetry, vividly conveying Juvenal's gift for evoking a wealth of imagery with a few economical phrases.

William James Niall Rudd (23 June 1927 – 5 October 2015) was an Irish-born British classical scholar. Rudd was born in Dublin and studied Classics at Trinity College, Dublin. He then taught Latin at the Universities of Hull and Manchester. From 1958 to 1968 he was Associate Professor of Latin at University College, Toronto. In 1968 he returned to England and taught for five years as a professor of Latin at the University of Liverpool.

Серия: Oxford World's Classics. Indeed you must excuse me. I could not act any thing if you were to give me the world. No, indeed, I cannot ac. At the age of ten, Fanny Price leaves the poverty of her Portsmouth home to be brought up among the family of her wealthy uncle, Sir Thomas Bertram, in the chilly grandeur of Mansfield Park. For some 20 years at the beginning of the century J M Barrie enjoyed enormous commercial success with a wide variety of plays, but he is best known for Peter Pan. It retains its popularity today, both in the original and in adaptations.

Juvenal wrote 16 satires, divided into five books, each with their own . Recommended translation: Juvenal, The Satires, Oxford World’s Classics translation by Niall Rudd with introduction and notes by William Barr (1992). Guide to the Classics.

Juvenal wrote 16 satires, divided into five books, each with their own target from decadent aristocrats to Egyptian cannibals.

Niall Rudd (t. : Juvenal: The Satires, with an Introduction and Notes by William Barr. Pp. xxxviii + 250. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1991. University of Liverpool. Published online by Cambridge University Press: 16 February 2009. Export citation Request permission.

Oxford Classical Texts: A. Persi Flacci et D. Iuni Iuvenalis: Saturae. Close section Satires.

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Study The Satires (Oxford World's Classics) discussion and chapter questions and find The Satires (Oxford World's Classics) study guide questions and answers. By College By High School By Country.

Commonly considered the greatest of Roman satirical poets, Juvenal is the author of sixteen satires of Roman society, notable for their pessimism and ironic humor. In this new translation of the Satires, Professor Rudd combines textual accuracy with colorful poetry, vividly conveying Juvenal's gift for evoking a wealth of imagery with a few economical phrases.About the Series: For over 100 years Oxford World's Classics has made available the broadest spectrum of literature from around the globe. Each affordable volume reflects Oxford's commitment to scholarship, providing the most accurate text plus a wealth of other valuable features, including expert introductions by leading authorities, voluminous notes to clarify the text, up-to-date bibliographies for further study, and much more.

Comments

Super P Super P
I am not qualified to give an educated opinion about Juvenal or his Satires. Working my way backwards from Patrick and Augustine, I am, only now beginning to touch upon "the classics". I have only now heard of this guy and I am completely BLOWN AWAY!!! How is it possible that he should be able to speak to me so clearly across the ages and remain absolutely current in tone and demeanor? Like Patrick and Augustine, Juvenal speaks largely in the VERY PERSONAL first person singular. That changes everything. This is old writing that can not be ignored when you read it today. Why wasn't I told about him sooner?
Ienekan Ienekan
Latin literature is well worth reading in English translations. It is a skill and art when the translator also has to deal with meter and rhythm in Roman poetry. Niall Rudd has done that in this updated version of a Roman classic (c. 2000 A.D.). Juvenal (~112-130 A.D.) wrote biting, sardonic poems against life in the Roman Empire of his day. Having lived under the terrible Emperor Domitian and some better ones, Juvenal experienced all too well what having an unstable political system the Empire had become. His Satires mock everything from excessive wealth to female liberation. A must read not only for the poetic but one man's view of the deteriorization of civil society under a capricious rule.
Onaxan Onaxan
I had to read two different editions/translations of this set of satires, and let me say that this one is much more modern and much funnier than the norton version. The notes in the norton version are certainly better, but as far as communicating ideas in an effective way without having the reader bogged down by oceans of notes, this version takes the cake.
Lanadrta Lanadrta
I have trouble staying interested in most plays or poems so I thought this was going to be difficult to read, but it was not (tip: read the Wikipedia summary for each Satire first, then read it in the book). Peter Green (Penguin) is my favorite translator of classics so definitely read his version. His line "Don't you want to cram whole notebooks with scribbled invective" felt very relatable to what's going on in my own life right now. Juvenal, who is known mostly for his sexual innuendo and anger, felt surprisingly Stoic to me. In fact, in one Satire he has what I feel is the best explanation of the difference between Stoics, Cynics and Epicureans-the Stoics and the Cynics have just a shirt between them. (See if you can figure out what he means.)