cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Buccaneers (Classics on Cassette)
eBook The Buccaneers (Classics on Cassette) ePub

eBook The Buccaneers (Classics on Cassette) ePub

by Edith Wharton,Marion Mainwaring,Dana Ivey

  • ISBN: 0453008542
  • Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Edith Wharton,Marion Mainwaring,Dana Ivey
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Highbridge Audio; Unabridged edition (November 1, 1993)
  • ePub book: 1780 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1894 kb
  • Other: lit rtf lrf azw
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 543

Description

Narrated by Dana Ivey.

Marion Mainwaring completed Wharton's book in the 1990s, around the same time that the movie was being .

Marion Mainwaring completed Wharton's book in the 1990s, around the same time that the movie was being made. Both achieved the end result that Wharton intended but Mainwaring's version is superior in every way, building as she did on the foundation Wharton had laid without subordinating or supplanting it. SPOILERS so they took their money to Europe. They married into Europe's aristocracy - a group that had the social cache they longed for and needed their 'new money'.

In 1993 Marion Mainwaring, a noted Wharton scholar, completed the story, in line with notes that Wharton had left behind.

She had written approximately 89,000 words before her death and the novel was printed in its incomplete form by her publisher. In 1993 Marion Mainwaring, a noted Wharton scholar, completed the story, in line with notes that Wharton had left behind.

deserves high marks for her ingenuity, novelistic skill, and critical intelligence. A sense of unobtrusive accuracy of tone and detail prevails throughout Ms. Mainwaring’s  . Mainwaring has finished the book in a style so identical to Wharton’s in spirit, vocabulary, sentence structure and rhythm that the transition should be imperceptible even to the original author’s most ardent admirers.

After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, "If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels.

Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. After Wharton's death in 1937, The Christian Science Monitor said, "If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels. Now, with wit and imagination, Marion Mainwaring has finished the story, taking her cue from Wharton's own synopsis. It is a novel any Wharton fan will celebrate and any romantic reader will love.

Nan and Virginia St. George have the great good luck to be born beautiful and wealthy - the two qualities prized above all others in 1870s New York - but the insurmountably bad luck to come from new money.

If it could have been completed, The Buccaneers would doubtless stand among the richest and most sophisticated of Wharton's novels. The Christian Science Monitor).

Five American girls, denied access to 1870s New York society due to the newness of their wealth, go to England to marry into the cash-hungry aristocracy, in a meticulous rendering of Wharton's unfinished masterpiece. Book available.

Comments

Itiannta Itiannta
Movies often don't do justice to the original material and I believe this is true for The Buccaneers. After seeing the movie I was a bit wary about reading the book, but I'm glad I took the chance and hope this review encourages others to do the same.

The story concerns five American heiresses – Conchita Closson; Virginia and Annabel "Nan" St. George; and Lizzie and Mabel Elmsworth – who are unable to gain entrée into the upper echelons of American society because their families' wealth comes from "new money." So the girls are introduced into English society with the assistance of Conchita, who has married the younger son of a marquess, and their governess, Miss Testvalley, whose previous posts included some of the noble families now on the girls' radar.

The Buccaneers was only about 2/3 complete when Edith Wharton died in 1937, and though her notes were not extensive they did include a synopsis of the main story lines. Marion Mainwaring completed Wharton's book in the 1990s, around the same time that the movie was being made. Both achieved the end result that Wharton intended but Mainwaring's version is superior in every way, building as she did on the foundation Wharton had laid without subordinating or supplanting it.

***SPOILERS***

Though the basic framework of the movie and the book are the same, the movie introduced several significant deviations that not only detracted from the story Wharton was trying to tell but turned it into soap opera fodder, i.e., Wharton never said or suggested that the Duke was sexually attracted to men, or that he consummated the marriage by raping Nan; the reason Conchita needed money was to pay off her and her husband's debts, not to terminate an unwanted pregnancy, and her husband did not have a venereal disease; and Guy never actually occupied a political perch from which to give revolutionary speeches. Nan left the Duke in both renditions but the movie's handling of this event was painfully anachronistic whereas Mainwaring's depiction fits more credibly with the place, the time and the characters that Wharton described.

In both book and movie Nan is the heroine of the piece, an endearing character whose romantic nature has been nurtured by her governess, mentor and friend, Miss Testvalley. The book effectively conveys why this was such a recipe for disaster: meeting the Duke among the "magical" ruins of his Cornish castle, Tintagel, Nan imbued him with qualities he simply did not possess. He was not a bad man, just so rigidly traditional and unimaginative that he didn't know how to function outside of strict order and ritual. Even his restoration of Tintagel lacked any hint of romanticism or whimsy - he considered it a "costly folly" that he was obligated to finish only because it had been started by his father.

The Duke fell in love with Nan (as much as he was capable) because of her "childish innocence, her indifference to money and honours", but he never gave a single thought to how stifling the rigid rules, the pomp and ceremony of life as he and his family lived it, were to the very qualities in Nan that first attracted him. She was simply expected to adapt. And she might well have done so in a less stagnant, emotionally stifling setting, such as the vastly different environment she later found at Lady Glenloe's home. But the Duke and his mother, the Dowager Duchess, had been firmly inculcated in the supremacy of tradition ("It has always been like that"), and they were as intolerant of the smallest suggestion of change as they were of Nan's "asking the reason of things that have nothing to do with reasons." So, for example, Nan was surprised by the radiant Correggio paintings ("those happy pagans") hanging on the walls of her boudoir, a room previously occupied by the Dowager Duchess, until she realized the Dowager would have considered displacing the paintings to be the more subversive act.

Mainwaring picks up Wharton's thread at the point where Nan is on an extended visit to the Glenloe family. Miss Testvalley is now employed there, and Guy and his father are near neighbors and regular visitors. Guy had recently agreed to become the Duke's candidate for the House of Commons but he knows this is impossible once he realizes he's in love with Nan and how unhappily married she is. Too honorable to act on or even reveal his feelings, neither can he bear the thought of spending time with her and the Duke as he would have to do as the Duke's political protege. So he decides to hire on with his old engineering firm and leave England again, and he only seeks out Nan to convince her to go with him after hearing that she has left the Duke.

The resolution of Nan and Guy's love story is only part of the appeal of Mainwaring's brilliant ending. She pulls together the threads placed by Wharton herself, drawing on the characterizations and events laid out in those earlier chapters to craft a delightfully satisfying conclusion. Reinforcing the titular theme as she ties up the loose ends, she puts on display the awe-inspiring talents of the truest buccaneers of them all, the Elmsworth sisters, as they surreptitiously aid the cause of Nan and Guy in pursuit of their own ambitious but believably achievable aims.
Haracetys Haracetys
The first two-thirds of the novel are interesting and historically relevant — not Wharton at her finest but as with almost anything written by Edith Wharton always a few on-point revelations about status conscious humankind sprinkled among the descriptions of clothes and social events. But then Wharton’s manuscript ends and Mainwaring steps in to complete the novel. It feels insipid, predictable and not quite right — whoever claimed they couldn’t tell the difference between Mainwaring and Wharton are either lying or far from insightful readers. I was cruelly disappointed by the final third of the novel — but I am glad to have had Wharton with me during the first two thirds.
Zyniam Zyniam
This Wharton novel is about 4 American Heiresses who aren't accepted by New York society because they come from "new money". So their Mothers take them to England and with the help of a marriage broker they all marry into the English Aristocracy. Most of these cash for class marriages weren't based on love but were based on how much money the wife's father was able to provide to the cash strapped English in-laws so they can fix up their grand country houses. Also required by the new ladies of the manor was to produce an heir to keep the ancestors happy. This book chronicles the up's and down's of three unhappy unions and the one that was based on love. It's believed that Wharton based the character of Nan, who became a Duchess, on Consuelo Vanderbilt. Even though the book is unfinished I still love it because I can imagine my own ending. Any fan of Downton would like this novel.
Qutalan Qutalan
Edith Wharton is one of my favorite, if not my favorite American novelist. The background of New York and European society life is of course always entertaining, but her deep insight into the emotional life of women is what makes me enjoy every book she wrote. My favorite may be "The Age of Innocence". "House of Mirth" is a contradiction in title; it's so painful to read that I find it emotionally draining. "The Buccaneers" is set again between the American and English aristocracy and super-rich, delving into the private emotions that run secretly and sometimes, scandalously not so secret, beneath the glossy surface.

If you find the book difficult to get into, you can always watch the admirable Buccaneers miniseries with Mira Sorvino and get a flavor for the story. But the book has more characters and is richer in texture. The ups and downs of Annabelle, her family and their reversal of fortune are breathtaking.

Edith Wharton died before she could finish this novel and it has been completed from her notes and synopsis. It is not my favorite novel of Wharton (that remains Age of Innocence) but it is a masterpiece and well worth reading.
from earth from earth
Julian Fellows, creator and writer of Downton Abbey, used "The Buccaneers" as part of his research into the 19th-century phenomenon of American girls from wealthy, new-money families who bought a title by marrying British aristocrats and infusing cash into their families' estates. Fellows reports that there were approximately 350 of these rich, young American women, which gave him the template for Cora Crawley, the Countess Grantham, and wife of Lord Grantham of Downton Abbey.

Wharton's book is a fascinating tale of four of these American girls whose newly wealthy families were shunned by New York's families of old-money wealth. Rejected by the snobs whose ancestors, not fathers, made their money, Virginia, Nan, Liz and Mabel do "a season" among London's old families. Two of them snag titled aristocrats, one a wealthy MP and the fourth returns to America to marry a wealthy countryman. Wharton's book is an engaging tale of the "Buccaneer" phenomenon and a fascinating study of the character of Nan, on whose head a tiara sits uncomfortably.