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eBook AT THE BOTTOM OF THE RIVER (Aventura: The Vintage Library of Contemporary World Literatu) ePub

eBook AT THE BOTTOM OF THE RIVER (Aventura: The Vintage Library of Contemporary World Literatu) ePub

by Jamaica Kincaid

  • ISBN: 0394736834
  • Category: Short Stories and Anthologies
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jamaica Kincaid
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Vintage; 1st Aventura ed edition (March 12, 1985)
  • Pages: 82
  • ePub book: 1339 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1560 kb
  • Other: txt rtf mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 859

Description

Praise for jamaica kincaid’s at the bottom of the river. There is the sound of her spirit back from the dead, looking at the man who used to groan; he is running a fever forever.

Praise for jamaica kincaid’s at the bottom of the river. There is the sound of a woman writing a letter; there is the sound of her pen nib on the white writing paper; there is the sound of the kerosene lamp dimming; there is the sound of her head aching.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity . Girl - In the night - At last - Wingless - Holidays - The letter from home - What I have been doing lately - Blackness - My mother - At the bottom of the river.

American Libraries Canadian Libraries Universal Library Community Texts Project Gutenberg Biodiversity Heritage Library Children's Library.

At the Bottom of the River is a collection of short stories by Caribbean novelist Jamaica Kincaid. Published in 1983, it was her first short story collection. Kincaid was awarded the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters in 1983 for the collection.

Jamaica Kincaid is a word witch, a sentence sorceress. At the Bottom of the River is a collection of her short stories in the form of prose poetry. My three favourite stories in the collection are Girl, In the Night, and My Mother.

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What was that light?). My hairbrush is full of dead hair. Where are the letters that brought the bad news? Where are they? These glasses commemorate a coronation. What are you now? A young woman what are you really? A young. What are you now? A young woman what are you really? A young woman. I know how hard that is. If only everything would talk. The floorboards made a nice pattern when the sun came in. (Was that the light again?). At night, after cleaning the soot from the lampshade, I lighted the lamp and, before preparing for bed, planned another day. So many things I forgot, though.

Other articles where At the Bottom of the River is discussed: Jamaica Kincaid: In 1983 Kincaid’s first book . Annie John (1984) and Lucy (1990) were novels but were autobiographical in nature, as were most of Kincaid’s.

Other articles where At the Bottom of the River is discussed: Jamaica Kincaid: In 1983 Kincaid’s first book, At the Bottom of the River, a collection of short stories and reflections, was published. Setting a pattern for her later work, it mixed lyricism and anger.

Published 1985 by Vintage Books in New York. Aventura : the Vintage library of contemporary world literature.

Kincaid's only short fiction collection, At the Bottom of the River (1983), is comprised of ten short stories, most of which had been published individually in various magazines from 1978 to 1982. Critics commend the l pieces in the volume for their poignant exploration of familial relationships and the effects of colonialism on Kincaid's native Antigua. A critical success, the collection was awarded the Morton Dauwen Zabel Award of the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters. Plot and Major Characters.

Reading Jamaica Kincaid is to plunge, gently, into another way of seeing both the physical world and its elusive inhabitants. Her books include At the Bottom of the River, Annie John, Lucy, The Autobiography of My Mother, and My Brother. She lives with her family in Vermont. Her voice is, by turns, naively whimsical and biblical in its assurance, and it speaks of what is partially remembered partly divined. The memories often concern a childhood in the Caribbean-family, manners, and landscape-as distilled and transformed by Kincaid's special style and vision.

This collection is Jamaica Kincaid's earliest published writings: her inspired, lyrical short stories.These stories plunge the listener gently into another way of perceiving both the physical world and its elusive inhabitants. Her narrative is, by turns, naïvely whimsical and biblical in its assurance, and it speaks of what is partially remembered, partly divined. The memories often concern a childhood in the Caribbean -- family, manners, and landscape -- as distilled and transformed by Kincaid's special style and vision.Kincaid leads us to consider, as if for the first time, the powerful ties between mother and child, the beauty and destructiveness of nature, the gulf between the masculine and the feminine, the significance of such familiar things as a house, a cup, a pen. Transfiguring our human form and our surroundings -- shedding skin, darkening an afternoon, painting a perfect place -- these stories tell us something we didn't know, in a way we hadn't expected.

Comments

Xanna Xanna
Lovely book -- one of those under-hyped classics. It's a collection of short stories that are written in an experimental style. Some stories are better than others, but it does include "Girl" which is the story of Kincaid's that's pretty popular and taught often in colleges. The stories are short and the book itself is super small, so that's good if you're looking for something quick. The experimental style might make it go a little slower, but yeah. It was chill.
Andriodtargeted Andriodtargeted
Saw Kincaid at the Chicago Humanities Festival on Northwestern U's campus and she read the first prose-poem in this book which was very funny.
Amhirishes Amhirishes
Ok
Livina Livina
got here perfectly and fast thank you
Fararala Fararala
Jamaica Kincaid's AT THE BOTTOM OF THE RIVER is a study of voice and language that first brought the author recognition beyond the pages of literary journals. These ten stories, all but the last extremely short, are set in an intense Caribbean landscape where a girl comes of age in the shadow of her mother; they are hallucinatory, tense, and indirect, leaving much for the reader to interpret. For example, the first story, "Girl", is a monologue spoken by the mother giving advice ("this is how you set a table for dinner") interspersed with comments degrading the daughter. The two italicized, one-sentence responses from the daughter speak volumes about this complicated relationship. "What I Have Been Doing Lately" is a dream-like narrative that lists what the narrator is (probably not) doing and, in the process, illustrates the emotional state of someone so sad that she just wants to lie in bed. "At the Bottom of the River", the final, longest, and most traditional of the stories, implies the past and future of the narrator through visions seen "at the bottom of the river."
Kincaid's style combines the effect of the simple but perfect word with the lilt of Caribbean rhythms. On the surface, these stories are not difficult to read, but they can be challenging to understand for the reader accustomed to more traditional methods of storytelling. The collection is about as short as a book can get, and so the stories can be read in one sitting, back to back, although their absorption can take much longer.
FLIDER FLIDER
At the Bottom of the River is a lovely rendition of a writer's mind, leisure, vision, appeal, hope, awareness and understanding. This project surpasses what the common reader readies for in the telling of a good story. Each sentence in this work is a story. I will write it again: Each sentence is a story with perfect images, "The branches were dead; a fly hung dead on the branches, its fragile body fluttering in the wind as if it were remnants of a beautiful gown." Ms. Kincaid's style throughout At the Bottom might put one in the mind of Gertrude Stein. The repetition. Certainly, however, Ms. Kincaid's project is her own, very distinctive genius. It takes us to a place that lacks anything hackneyed and it is shaped with qualities that peck at our curiousity. The book works in first person and third person never conveniently laying the story out as a consecutive. But there are characters; there is a central character to follow. The movement is chopped with these extraordinary, brilliant images beyond description and most every sentence leaves on the tongue the question of "who did that?" or "why?": "Someone is making a basket, someone is making a girl a dress or a boy a shirt, someone is making her husband a soup with cassava so that he can take it to the cane field tomorrow, someone is making his wife a beautiful mahogany chest, someone is sprinkling a colorless powder outside a closed door so that someone else's child will be stillborn." And so you get these incredible juxtapositions along side wholesome chops of fascinating imagery. We move through childhood, through relationships, through friendships, through parents and through self. And there is even dialogue for the reader who whines that there is no plot.
Ms. Kincaid writes this piece in a style that is deeply dense and in a way we are able to see, on the pages, a character's mind, discovery, understanding and wonder (no part of nature is left unturned). We are even privy to questions and philosophy and resignations about life and death. In this piece Ms. Kincaid gives new meaning to "the universal eye".
At the Bottom of the River is brilliant, genius! A must read!
Gri Gri
'At the Bottom of the River' is a lyrical collection of some of Jamaica Kincaid's most provocative writing. Although occasionally confounding in her use of abstract images and construction of abstruse and ethereal narratives, Kincaid's stories nevertheless contain breathtaking lyricism and innovative lines of poetic prose; her words seem to reverberate from the very recesses of metamorphic meaning.

This collection begins innocently enough with one of Kincaid's most impacting writings, Girl. Girl is one of the most severe but accurate depictions of the volatile intensity between mother and daughter. Fueled by a combination of love, fear, and partial loathing, a mother doles out a mantra of life lessons with equal parts concern and venom: "When buying cotton to make yourself a nice blouse, be sure that it doesn't have gum on it, because that way it won't hold up well after a wash. ... Always eat your food in such a way that it won't turn someone else's stomach; on Sundays try to walk like a lady and not like the (...) you are so bent on becoming." The essays that follow are sinewy with sexual, violent, and spiritual themes.

Kincaid's strength lies in her rage. One senses it above all in her amazing control over words, which, while extremely satisfying on the level of literary technique, also comes across as a refusal to be vulnerable and a reply to anyone who would try to keep her down.

Like a journal, 'At the Bottom of the River' matures in content as it proceeds. Kincaid's prose-poetry initially appears whimsical (she describes some pebbles as "not pebbly enough") and that's the mystique of her writing, how it almost capriciously masks cerebral contemplations on living, dying, and the struggle in-between.