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eBook Leave It to Me ePub

eBook Leave It to Me ePub

by Bharati Mukherjee

  • ISBN: 0679434275
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Bharati Mukherjee
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Knopf; 1st edition (June 2, 1997)
  • Pages: 239
  • ePub book: 1708 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1928 kb
  • Other: doc lrf mbr azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 559

Description

Mukherjee Bharati (EN). A very fine writer, funny, intelligent, versatile and, on occasion, unexpectedly profound. -The Washington Post Book World"MUKHERJEE IS FEARLESS.

Mukherjee Bharati (EN). Take the wild ride with Debby DiMartino from Albany to San Francisco, from lost child to masked avenger. -The Boston Globe"POWERFULLY WRITTEN. Debby has no memory of her birth parents.

Bharati Mukherjee's rambunctious and mythic novel, Leave It To Me is a fast-paced tale that lassos and wrestles the . The book was interesting at first. But then quickly devolved into an over-stylized mess of unbelievable characters

Bharati Mukherjee's rambunctious and mythic novel, Leave It To Me is a fast-paced tale that lassos and wrestles the mixed race experience to the ground. Her writing, as in Jasmine and Middlemen & Other Stories, scintillates. She cuts through all the . and morass to get to the beating, bleeding heart of our racially complex world. But then quickly devolved into an over-stylized mess of unbelievable characters. It's as if the author, a professor, gave herself the Although it pains me to admit it, and I can hear my friend Renee laughing at me already, I picked this book up by mistake.

Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta. Q: Would it be fair to describe your own attitude toward contemporary America in Leave It to Me as clearly critical?

Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta. She attended the universities of Calcutta and Baroda, where she received a master’s degree in English and Ancient Indian Culture. She came to America in 1961 to attend the Writer’s Workshop and received . ore about Bharati Mukherjee. About Bharati Mukherjee. Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta. Q: Would it be fair to describe your own attitude toward contemporary America in Leave It to Me as clearly critical? BM: I have a clear-eyed love of the United States. I have chosen the United States as my "homeland" because I believe in the democratic ideals that are guaranteed by the Constitution and the Bill of Rights.

be admired and to rescue waifs like me so he’d be adored. I figure a guy who makes himself that indispensable must collect in imaginative ways. He didn’t look it, but he could turn out to be more dangerous than Frankie. At least Ham didn’t come on direct, forthright, as Frankie had, which was just as well

Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta, India on July 27, 1940. In 1988, The Middleman and Other Stories won the National Book Critics Circle Award for fiction.

Bharati Mukherjee was born in Calcutta, India on July 27, 1940. She received a bachelor's degree in English from the University of Calcutta in 1959 and a master's degree from the University of Baroda in 1961. After sending six stories to the University of Iowa, she was accepted into the Iowa Writers' Workshop. in 1963 and a doctorate in comparative literature in 1969 from the University of Iowa. She died from complications of rheumatoid arthritis and takotsubo cardiomyopathy, a stress-induced heart condition, on January 28, 2017 at the age of 76.

Leave It to Me. A Novel. Mukherjee is the author of eight books of fiction-Desirable Daughters, The Tiger’s Daughter, Wife, Darkness, The Middleman and Other Stories (which won the National Book Critics Circle Award in 1989), Jasmine Leave It to Me, and The Holder of the World-and two books of nonfiction, written with her husband, Days and Nights in Calcutta and The Sorrow and. Terror. More from Bharati Mukherjee. Leave It to Me. by Bharati Mukherjee. Excerpt.

Follow Bharati Mukherjee and explore their bibliography from .

com's Bharati Mukherjee Author Page. Mukherjee is best known for her novels "The Tiger's Daughter" (1971); "Wife" (1975); "Jasmine" (1989); "The Holder of the World" (1993); "Leave It to Me" (1997); "Desirable Daughters" (2002); "The Tree Bride" (2004); and "Miss New India" (2011). Her short story collections and memoirs include "Darkness" (1985); "The Middleman and Other Stories" (1988); and "A Father". Non Fiction works include: "Days and Nights in Calcutta"; and "The Sorrow and the Terror

Leave it to me. by. Mukherjee, Bharati. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Gutierres on September 27, 2011.

A very fine writer, funny, intelligent, versatile and, on occasion, unexpectedly profound. The Washington Post Book.

shows Mukherjee at the peak of her craft. Mixing the Greek myth of Electra with the Indian myth of Devi, she sends Devi/Debby careening down on the Bay Area like an elemental force of vengeance. -San Francisco Chronicle. Bharati Mukherjee, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award, is the author of eight novels and two short story collections and is the coauthor of two books of non?ction. She is a professor of English at the University of California, Berkeley. Visit ww. issnewindia.

Debby DeMartino, in her early 20s, adopted as a toddler, is determined to find her biological parents. Her mother was a California flower child, her father a murderer now serving life in an Asian prison. All Debby has of them is a literally haunting past, but now she wants revenge. So she heads for San Francisco, where she finds that living the life of her newly named persona, Devi Dee, she senses that she may have inherited more than she imagined.

Comments

Manemanu Manemanu
When I first picked up this slim 239-page trade paperback novel I was intrigued. The voice is that of a 23-year old modern young woman with a sharp irreverent mind. She was adopted at the age of two from an orphanage in India and brought up in Schenectady, NY. Her birth mother was an American hippie, her birth father was a Eurasian serial killer. She goes to the Bay Area in California in search to try to find out her true identity.
However, this story is more than a simple tale. It takes the myth of Electra, blends it with the myth of the Goddess Devi, adds weird and outrageous violence, and takes the reader on a roller coaster ride. This is not a realistic book in any way. Told against the backdrop of the hippie and Vietnam veteran legacy, and the lifestyle of Berkley, California, the voice is sharp and probing. The words are sometimes as violent as the action. There isn't one sympathetic character in the book. Many die in terrible ways. The coincidences are too strange, the violence too intrusive, and the murder and mayhem too shocking.
The story haunts on many levels though and emerges as a small work of art even though it is upsetting and unpleasant to read. There is a long interview with the author at the end of the book. Also a teaching guide. I think they were necessary and even more interesting than the book. The author was brought up in an upper class family in India, came to America in the 60s, has a Ph.D. in English and even though the voice she writes in seems simple, there are many complexities underneath.
I can't recommend this book but I'm glad I read it.
Fordredor Fordredor
How this book got published is a mystery to me. This has got to be without a doubt the worst novel I have ever read. There are no redeeming qualities here. The story line is ridiculous. The coincidences are too much to bear. Debby, who is adopted by an Italian couple as a toddler, never develops much love for them, even though they are decent, loving people. She saves her love and sick fascination for her birth parents, a Fresno woman who went to India in the 60's looking for a guru, and the guru himself, a serial killer currently in prison. She wants to meet them and then do some sort of damage to them, as payback (for what? She was better off growing up in Schenedctady). Debby graduates from college and manages to become the lover of a filthy rich ex-Jackie Chan of sorts. He doesn't give her the respect she "deserves" so she torches his apartment. Then she escapes to California, in search for bio-parents. While in the Haight-Ashbury, she manages to charm a film producer who happens to know her bio-mom. Debby is the luckiest person on earth!!! There are 30 million souls in CA and she happens to bang the guy who is banging her mom. Debby (now named Devi) will not know this until later in the story, when the private eye she has hired reveals the whole mystery, and soon disappears, and at this point I had had enough of this poor excuse for a novel and threw it across the room. The only thing that really piqued my interest is the reference to Ashrams in blue collar Napa. Wow. Other than that, this was a waste of pulp.
Paxondano Paxondano
Sometimes I think people write to exorcise personal demons. This is one of those times, and I was not sorry when, like at the end of an overblown grand opera, all the main characters died. Catharsis. Baas. The end.

The main character is an adopted girl who has had a safe and secure Italian-American childhood in Schenectady, NY but goes in search of her birth parents. In California, she discovers that they are both dangerous and totally whacko, and that she, herself, is more a product of nature than nurture.

This has a better story line than any in Mukherjee's short story collection entitled "Darkness," but it is equally wierd. "Leave it to Me" and "Darkness" are similarly creepy books and not up to Mukherjee's usual brilliant standards.

Kim Burdick
Stanton, Delaware
Vudogal Vudogal
Although I was initially intrigued by the Electra concept and a search for identity, I was disappointed by the lack of depth and realism in this book. After laying a groundwork of excellent prose, an interesting heroine, and some sharp humor, I found the much of the body and ending of this book to be simply ridiculous. Maybe I missed something, but I couldn't believe how this book ended. The main character (Debbi/Devi) doesn't seem to have completed her journey to find her identity. There wasn't any reasonable resolution, just a crazy plot. I would have been more satisfied reading a comic book.
unmasked unmasked
I think one of the main problems with this book might be Debbie/Devi herself. She is simply not likeable. She is smug, smarmy, ungrateful, self-absorbed, and luckier than she ever seems to comprehend. Aside from a few moments here and there, I had trouble feeling any real sympathy for her. I could not understand most of her motivations. Just like I could not understand this novel's plot. Mukherjee sets up all the players brilliantly...then lets them crash into each other haphazardly, leaving the reader confused and unsatisfied. The true climax of the book should be when Devi finally confronts her birth parents, but when that scene finally occurs everything just dissolves into a nonsensical bloodbath that doesn't particularly resolve anything. The only thing that keeps this book from being a waste of paper is the fascinating prose. I didn't like Devi, but I loved hearing her talk. Her voice is unique and distinctive, hip and dark and poetic. Even when she isn't making any sense, her strange little riffs on revenge and adoption and forces of nature are a pleasure to read.