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eBook George Bush, Dark Prince of Love: A Presidential Romance ePub

eBook George Bush, Dark Prince of Love: A Presidential Romance ePub

by Lydia Millet

  • ISBN: 0684862743
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Lydia Millet
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Touchstone; Original ed. edition (January 25, 2000)
  • Pages: 160
  • ePub book: 1273 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1507 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf docx azw
  • Rating: 4.2
  • Votes: 206

Description

Realists will scoff at George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. Like protons and electrons or something. Lydia Millet's 'My Happy Life' tore me to shreds with its realism of harsh times, harsh lives, and those forced unwillingly into horrid circumstances

Realists will scoff at George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. Absurdists, however, may rejoice. Lydia Millet's 'My Happy Life' tore me to shreds with its realism of harsh times, harsh lives, and those forced unwillingly into horrid circumstances. Where 'My Happy Life' is depressing with raw helplessness, 'Dark Prince Of Love' is hilarious in pointing towards the everyday psychotic behavior of those whom you pass cautiously on the sidewalk, knowing something is wrong but unable to pinpoint it.

Millet, Lydia, 1968-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Lydia Millet was raised in Toronto, Canada

Written with razor-sharp satiric wit and packed with wry observations of our times, our presidents, and our electorate, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love is a hilarious antidote to the hype and hypocrisy of America's most hallowed institutions. Lydia Millet was raised in Toronto, Canada. She is the author of Omnivores, has contributed to The Baffler and The Guardian, and her work appears in Mirror, Mirror on the Wall, an anthology of essays by women. She lives in Tucson, Arizona, and New York City. George Bush, Dark Prince of Love: A Presidential Romance.

Her second, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love (2000), is a political comedy about a trailer-park woman obsessed with the 41st American .

Her second, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love (2000), is a political comedy about a trailer-park woman obsessed with the 41st American president. It is narrated by, as the Village Voice glowing deems her, "an orphan cruelly mistreated by life who nevertheless regards her meager subsistence as a radiant gift.

A fresh, sardonic riff on the George Bush years, told in the voice of a wily, off-kilter, and wholly lovable ex-con who sets her heart on capturing the attention of the Leader of the Free World. Some women like muscle. Personally, I've always preferred the underdog.

Although she didn't have the plumbing, she deluded herself that she was the modern . about Margaret Thatcher, .

George Bush, Dark Prince of Love Quotes Showing 1-1 of 1. Although she didn't have the plumbing, she deluded herself that she was the modern . ― Lydia Millet, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love.

GEORGE BUSH: DARK PRINCE OF LOVE is the heartbreaking and hysterical tale of one woman's schoolgirl. Reflections Of A ManReflections Of A Man is a book designed for both men and women to enhance the q. .

Realists will scoff at George Bush, Dark Prince of Love.

A Presidential Romance. Squeaky Frome + S. J. Perelman Lydia Millet's George Bush, Dark Prince of Love

A Presidential Romance. Perelman Lydia Millet's George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. Millet's characters are etched in acid, but it all goes down like Holland gin. Her prose sits like a jewel atop a wan era. It almost makes the Bush years worth it - and God knows we may have to get used to them all over again. As Groucho Marx once said, "anyone who doesn't like this book is healthy. I loved it. Resources and Downloads. High Resolution Images. Book Cover Image (jpg): George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. Trade Paperback 9780684862743. Author Photo (jpg): Lydia Millet.

Lydia Millet is da bomb. George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. Literall. hough Oh Pure and Radiant Heart possesses the nervy irreverence of Kurt Vonnegut and Joseph Heller, Millet makes the subject matter her own, capturing the essence of these geniuses in a way that can only be described as, well, genius. Brilliant and fearles. illet takes a headlong run at the subject of nuclear annihilation, weaving together black comedy, science, history, and time travel to produce, against stiff odds, a shattering and beautiful work. Entertainment Weekly.

"Some women like muscle. Brute strength, or the illusion of it. Their idea of an attractive man is a craggy meatpacker with a squirrel brain, who likes to crush vermin with his bare fist. I call these women Reaganites....Personally, I've always preferred the underdog." Rosemary is an ex-con with no viable career prospects, a boyfriend old enough to be her grandfather, and a major obsession with our nation's forty-first president, whom she fondly refers to as "G.B." Unexpectedly smitten during his inaugural address, Rosemary is soon anticipating G.B.'s public appearances with the enthusiasm she once reserved for all-you-can-eat breakfast buffets. As her ardor and determination to gain G.B.'s affection grow, Rosemary embarks on an increasingly outrageous campaign that escalates from personal letters to paid advertising, until at last she reaches the White House. What happens next is nothing like how Rosemary imagined it would be. Written with razor-sharp satiric wit and packed with wry observations of our times, our presidents, and our electorate, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love is a hilarious antidote to the hype and hypocrisy of America's most hallowed institutions.

Comments

Zieryn Zieryn
Like protons and electrons or something. Lydia Millet's 'My Happy Life' tore me to shreds with its realism of harsh times, harsh lives, and those forced unwillingly into horrid circumstances. Where 'My Happy Life' is depressing with raw helplessness, 'Dark Prince Of Love' is hilarious in pointing towards the everyday psychotic behavior of those whom you pass cautiously on the sidewalk, knowing something is wrong but unable to pinpoint it.

'GB, Dark Prince Of Love' had me shrieking with laughter, written from the psychotic POV of Rosemary, an ex-con who spent time in a maximum security prison for running a stop sign and killing her passenger and best friend Shelly.

Released from prison and set up in a mobile home park in 1989, she is free just in time to absorb herself in the election process of George Bush Senior. She has a job on an assembly line folding box tops when she meets Russell in a drugstore line. Russell is an antisocial Korean War vet with a laryngectomy, a cocaine habit, and a penchant for pulling mean pranks.

The book told in comical, first person perspective by Rosemary, who takes GB's speeches so literally that she uses them to guide her everyday life. Learning from GB's "outright denial-tactic" of his relationship with Noriega, Rosemary gets Russell drunk and convinces him to sign over the deed to his house to her.

When Russell almost OD's on cocaine, Rosemary gets scolded in the ER, Russell is forced into a dry out facility where he breaks his hip during a chair-standing soliloquy that no one understood because of his voice box. Rosemary sets up her shrine to GB in Russell's basement, and moves into his house, taking up with an illegal Mexican immigrant named Jose while Russell is hospitalized. Before Russell comes home Rosemary calls the DOJ and has Jose deported.

Rosemary's memories of her youth with Shelly, her relationship with Russell and his war buddy Apache who unexpectedly moves in for awhile, Jose, her co-workers, and eventually the Secret Service who respond to her strange letters written to the white house, all revolve around Rosemary's obsession with GB, and the shrine she built to him.

This is a very funny satirical novel about abnormal obsessions, bad habits, odd people, and sadly, the voting public. Lydia Millet is a very talented writer that brings both wit and deep emotion into her novels, whether serious or funny. I strongly recommend picking up one of her novels. Enjoy!
Shadowredeemer Shadowredeemer
But I had to take one star off for the author's bigotry. I do not think she is aware of it. She is a bit insulting.
Still In Mind Still In Mind
Lydia Millet, George Bush- Dark Prince of Love (Scribner's, 2000)

The idea of anyone finding a president sexy-- at least, any president we've had since, oh, Teddy Roosevelt or so-- strikes the same kind of nerve with me as does the idea of having weird leechlike creatures infest peoples' bodies and turn them into mutant zombies (see? there's Night of the Creeps again!). The idea that someone could take such a feeling to the obsessive heights of the stalker is right up there with having dinner at Alf Packer's house. And that's exactly what Lydia Millet gives us in her second novel, George Bush, Dark Prince of Love. It's sick, it's twisted, and every once in a while it's extremely funny.

There's always a rather nasty outsider's-perspective criticism (Millet comes originally from Toronto, though she now lives in Arizona) rumbling just beneath the surface, rather like the ground as her three-hundred-pound plus protagonist, an ex-con named Rosemary (we're never told her last name), goes by. Rosemary is a real peach, the kind of person you never want to be on the wrong side of-- after all, she may decide to wire your office with plastique. Through a rather odd coincidence, Rosemary finds herself feeling as if she has a spiritual connection with George Bush, and we see the four years of G.B.'s presidency through the decidedly jaundiced eyes of Rosemary as she alternately deals with her life as is and tries to get herself into positions where she might manage to usurp Barbara's place in the estimations of the man of her dreams.

Thought the book weighs in at a rather slim 159 pages, it still feels like it goes a tad long. There are some sections about halfway through that bog down. But then, one could argue, that's exactly how Bush's presidency went. Amen. So I'm willing to give Ms. Millet the benefit of the doubt, at least enough to go searching for her first novel, Omnivores. Work this twisted deserves an audience. ** 1/2
Togar Togar
If, say, Roseanne and Jeff Foxworthy were to inhabit the Sunday morning political talk shows instead of Sam and Cokie, you might find humor and current-events commentary similar to "George Bush: Dark Prince of Love." This fairly short book is part political satire, part modern history lesson and part bizarre and humorous character portrait. Protagonist Rosemary -- ex-con, sometime substance abuser, con artist -- is the classic antihero: you like her and root for her despite her antisocial and often unattractive personality traits. The novel is structured chronologically around George Bush's presidency, as Rosemary becomes more and more infatuated (obsessed?) with Mr. Bush's public persona and executes a plan to gain his attention and win his love. Without spoiling it, let's just say that the denouement is hilarious and perfectly appropriate. I am still wondering just who in the book is crazy and who is not: Rosemary? Mr. Bush? Both? Neither? While I heartily enjoyed this book, it definitely will not appeal to everyone. Disguised within Rosemary's admiring commentary is biting and keen observation about the Bush presidency, so if you sincerely admire and respect Mr. Bush, this is not a good choice for you. If you are not a big fan of absurdism (a la Tom Robbins or John Irving, for example), or if the snarky tone of Comedy Central's "The Daily Show" leaves you cold, you would also do well to look elsewhere. But if you're looking for keen political satire in the guise of a rather bizarre romance, give this unusual and smartly written book a try.