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eBook Slipstream: A Novel ePub

eBook Slipstream: A Novel ePub

by Leslie Larson

  • ISBN: 0307337995
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Leslie Larson
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Shaye Areheart Books (May 16, 2006)
  • Pages: 336
  • ePub book: 1743 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1119 kb
  • Other: mbr doc mobi rtf
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 326

Description

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In Slipstream, Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers.

In Slipstream, Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks, minor failures, and a reckless pursuit of elusive second chances. When Rudy loses his job cleaning jets at the airport, his sanity and his marriage threaten to follow.

Электронная книга "Slipstream: A Novel", Leslie Larson In Slipstream, Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks, minor failures, and a reckless pursuit o. .

Электронная книга "Slipstream: A Novel", Leslie Larson. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "Slipstream: A Novel" для чтения в офлайн-режиме. In Slipstream, Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks, minor failures, and a reckless pursuit of elusive second chances.

Slipstream : a novel. Slipstream : a novel. by. Larson, Leslie, 1956-. Los Angeles International Airport, Airports, Airports. New York : Shaye Areheart Books. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AltheaB on January 5, 2010.

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Great novel, enjoyed how the different characters' lives came together. Some outcomes were quite predictable, though not all. Points for having a bisexual character who was not crazy.

ISBN 10: 0307337995, ISBN 13: 9780307337993. Published by Shaye Areheart Books, 2006. Used Condition: Used: Good Hardcover. From Ergodebooks (RICHMOND, TX, .

Leslie Larson, writer, author of Slipstream. A funny, touching novel. Larson is a deft storyteller. Her prose is fast-paced and edgy, racing toward the book's conclusion like a 747 barreling down a runway. Larson has given her an audacious and memorable voice. Profane, harrowing, comical. Cleveland Plain Dealer. Impressively rich, darkly plotted, and seriously frightening. Larson is a master of details, coloring in her precise and increasingly jittery scene with tight specificity.

In "Slipstream," Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks, minor failures, and a reckless pursuit of elusive second chances.

In Leslie Larson’s novel Slipstream, the question is not why we leave but that we leave again and again, each time set against the incredible drama of our surreal lives

In Leslie Larson’s novel Slipstream, the question is not why we leave but that we leave again and again, each time set against the incredible drama of our surreal lives. She inhabits her sharp, incisive, smart novel with lives we know and know of, sometimes too closely, lives that begin and begin again and seem to end and end again, departures and arrivals amidst the terror of our daily chaos. Larson renders beautifully a lower-middle-class California that’s being squeezed out of a place to live, and provides an intricate and moving sense of the way in which such characters’ lives go wrong and the persistence of their resolve to turn them around.

In Slipstream, Leslie Larson traces the intertwining paths of five characters as each struggles to stay afloat in the face of major setbacks, minor failures, and a reckless pursuit of elusive second chances. When Rudy loses his job cleaning jets at the airport, his sanity and his marriage threaten to follow. While his wife, Inez, secretly saves her pennies and plots an escape, his coworker Wylie, a bartender at LAX, is about to receive the surprise of his life. Meanwhile, Wylie’s brother, Logan, freshly released from jail, tries desperately to stay out of trouble while traipsing through a minefield of temptation. And Logan’s daughter Jewell is nursing a heart broken once by an unfaithful girlfriend and again by a father who can’t seem to stick around. Though they don’t know it, these five people are headed toward an explosive event that will have consequences for them all.Deftly weaving suspense, humor, and revelation, Slipstream is a rich human drama with the breathless pace of a thriller and the soul of classic noir.Also available as a Books on Tape AudioBook and as an eBook

Comments

Nto Nto
I was completely wrapped up in this wonderfully told tale of five characters and an airport in contemporary LA, whose lives intersect in minor and major ways. I was really impressed by this writer's skill in making me care so deeply, so quickly, about the characters. I could not wait to find out what happened to all of them. I found the ending very satisfying. This was a heart-wrenching, thought-provoking read. Thanks to Leslie Larson! I will be looking for more of her work.
Pryl Pryl
I think of literary fiction as being more "character driven" and genre fiction (suspense, mystery, etc.) as being situation driven. What intrigued me about Slipstream is that it is primarily character driven but has all the page turner characteristics of the best genre fiction.

There are 5 primary characters in Slipstream, and they were all very different from each other. Yet the author seemed intimately familiar with them all. Of the male characters I kept thinking, only a man could have written that. And of the female characters, I felt that only a woman could have had the minute insights into the female personalities being described. The characters seem to be drawn in 3D relief, some are pathetic, others are weird, others likable, etc.

Somehow a tension is introduced into all of this, making you wonder what's up with these people, where they're going, what's going to get in the way. I really admired the author's ability to get into the hearts and souls of these people that habitate the "just a step or two away from the skids" regions of society we are all familiar with, while keeping me entranced with wondering, what's going to happen next?
Steel_Blade Steel_Blade
Slipstream, $23.95 US, is an impressive novel from Berkeley author Leslie Larson that you'll probably find enjoyment in. Set in Los Angeles, this drama examines the lives of five characters that all happen to intersect in one place -- LAX. Have you ever been through Los Angeles International? Larson uses metaphorical arrivals and departures at the terminal to illuminate the desolation and melancholia of the city.

Look at some of Larson's characters: Rudy Cullen, he's lost his supervisory job cleaning jets; Inez Cullen, she's Rudy's Avon-selling soon-to-be ex-wife; Tommy Wylie, he's content bartending to anxious travelers; Logan Wylie, he's Tommy's just-released jailbird brother; and finally Jewel Wylie, she's niece to Tommy -- the estranged daughter of Logan -- and a student at UCLA. Unknown to the five, they're all headed for sorrow.

If Leslie's book succeeds, it's because she creates vivid portraits: "The guy gave Wylie a quick once-over. Summed him up and kissed him off. The uniform probably had a lot to do with it, Wylie thought -- the black slacks and the putty-colored polo shirt that said TOP HAT ENTERPRISES over the breast pocket." Larson's deliberate eye and measured descriptions elevate her writing to high literature.

Perhaps you've seen guys like Tommy Wylie before, but do you know their ambitions? Larson wants you to notice the service people you bypass every day, and ponder their lives. She relates how others see Wylie: "He didn't suspect that Wylie could play slide guitar, frame a house, and smoke a salmon to perfection." Wylie's clearly an ignored character. All of Larson's characters are similarly neglected.

Something about Larson's writing just screams social injustice. Who are all these lower-middle class people in Los Angeles, and why are they being squeezed out of a place to live? For example, why would Jewel continue to live with Celeste (and baby-sit Celeste's daughter Rachel without pay) when it's clear that Celeste is really in love with Dana? Celeste is clearly taking advantage of her kindness.

The genius of this book resides in the slow manner in which Larson transforms her book from a slice-of-life drama into a highly focused thriller. Tommy is jittery when he's on-shift at the bar in the pavilion at LAX, but is that because of episodes spawned from his time in Vietnam decades ago, or a more immediate threat? Celeste is similarly spooked by an ominous outdoor warning system on the UCLA campus. All the foreshadowing pays off later.

Rudy is likable at first, since Glenn Waller unceremoniously laid him off from his ground support job with the airline industry in Chapter 2. Readers are initially sympathetic to him, until Larson clues you in that he may not be a worthy guy. His wife Inez has been secretly plotting to leave him, with daughter Vanessa in tow, for months now.

Even though his dismissal was pretty awful, you've got to wonder why Rudy can't just shake it off and transition. He goes home to Inez and reports a big promotion, and then starts behaving strangely -- acting like he's going to work every day when he's really wandering through the city aimlessly -- pilfering items and getting in quarrels with complete strangers.

As bleak as Larson's manuscript is in spots, I don't want to give you the wrong impression. Her characters may come across as being downtrodden or flawed, but they're authentic. Jewel perseveres with aplomb and humor, even though she breaks up with Celeste in the end. Tommy also gets the shock of his life when his girlfriend Carolyn announces that she's pregnant.

My only quibble with Slipstream is that it's divided into two uneven sections, one labeled Tuesday, November 19th and the other Friday, December 13th. Those demarcation dates seem arbitrary since the first section is 253 pages, and the melodramatic finale is only 61 pages. Everything that occurs in the book happens over roughly 25 days, and breaking the manuscript up into four even sections (22nd, 29th, 6th, and 13th) would've built more tension.

The Book:

Slipstream,

Shaye Areheart Books

ISBN:

0307337995 or

9780307337003

Pages:

324 Pages

Rating:

5 Stars

Chapters:

36 Numbered Chapters

Pros: I can't wait until this is made into a movie.

Cons: I found one mangled sentence in the fourth paragraph on page 304.
Gavirim Gavirim
I was surprised to discover this was the author's first published novel. It's very polished and literary with excellent character development and a gripping story. Lots of clever analogies and dark humor. My favorite part is when the Jewell character is working at her school cafeteria and deals with a complaint about the cheese on the omelets: ...Jewell slid the spatula under the omelet like she was slitting a throat. She catapulted it into the garbage behind her, where it landed with the dull thud of a dead body. "Anything else? Sausage?" She picked one up with the tongs and held it so the girl could inspect its turd-like profile. "Look, not a speck of cheese."... That one made me laugh out loud. Ms. Larson does a great job of getting inside the heads of the male and female characters and scenes like that bring them to life. A great read from a promising writer.
Doomblade Doomblade
I enjoyed this first novel by this author. I won't tell you the plot, or give away the ending. It is a story about 5 very ordinary people living in Los Angeles. They are a long way from rich, beautiful and glamorous. They are exactly the opposite. The characters are very common. They face their share of failures and set backs. It is not a thriller, but a human drama. All the action in this book is at the very end.
Wel Wel
My sense was that the author was mocking her characters. Certainly there is a lot of description of the 5 characters, making them unattractive, unhappy, stupid people. The only suspense I felt was to guess which one of them was going to explode first. I suppose if you are an intellectually superior sort of person, you might enjoy pitying those characters.
It's so easy It's so easy
Maybe I should have given the novel a better chance, but only made it through the first two chapters. A previous reviewer described the work as "high literature," and I have to strongly disagree. The prose seemed unpolished, and ultimately boring. It's certainly not a book that "grabs" one from the beginning. I felt the character development inadequate - I didn't get a good feel of who these people were, or a part of their world. It came across to me a collection of cliches, stereotypes. Maybe the book gets better as it goes, but I didn't feel it was worth my time to keep reading. Not enough sense of mystery from the outset.