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eBook Book: A Novel ePub

eBook Book: A Novel ePub

by Robert Grudin

  • ISBN: 0679411852
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Robert Grudin
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Random House; 1st edition (August 25, 1992)
  • Pages: 251
  • ePub book: 1758 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1714 kb
  • Other: mobi txt docx rtf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 158

Description

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Book: A Novel (1992) is a metafictional novel by Robert Grudin, published in 1992. The novel was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize in Literature

Book: A Novel (1992) is a metafictional novel by Robert Grudin, published in 1992. The novel was shortlisted for the Pulitzer Prize in Literature. The story follows English professor Adam Snell as he realizes that someone is trying to kill both him and his book, Sovrana Sostrata, a book about truth.

The English department at the University of Washagon is in a uproar. Robert Grudin's novel Book (1992) is great fun, even more so if you are in academia

The English department at the University of Washagon is in a uproar. Robert Grudin's novel Book (1992) is great fun, even more so if you are in academia. This book is damned funny.

First published by Random House, 1992. The original book is printed faintly.

Universities and colleges, English literature. New York : Penguin Books. First published by Random House, 1992.

Happiness may well consist primarily of an attitude toward time.

Book: A Novel (1992) is a metafictional novel by Robert Grudin. Last updated October 12, 2019. book by Robert Grudin

Book: A Novel (1992) is a metafictional novel by Robert Grudin, published in 1992. book by Robert Grudin. The correct title of this article is Book: A Novel. The substitution or omission of the colon is due to technical restrictions.

Written by. Robert Grudin. Manufacturer: Random House Inc (T) Release date: 1 August 1992 ISBN-10 : 0679411852 ISBN-13: 9780679411857.

Publication Date: Jan 1, 1997.

A hilarious college caper lampoons critical theorists, spoofs the New York publishing scene, and parodies seventeen separate literary forms as it follows a search for the missing Professor Adam Snell and his book.

Comments

Tiainar Tiainar
What better gift can you give to your scholastic loved one than a book in which the footnotes get disgusted with the main text and revolt?
Gigafish Gigafish
I was given this by my old English teacher and had to search for years to find it again to gift to others. This book and its somewhat meta-style narrative is for anyone who loves the idea of books and reading. Especially appreciative would be literature teachers and folks who dig Jasper Fford and Robertson Davies. I can never find this one in stores so if it's available get it for the book lover in your life.
Gaxaisvem Gaxaisvem
Excellent
Kanek Kanek
One of the great books of academic humor. I don't know why it didn't get broader popularity. It deserves a renaissance. Brilliant.
Steelcaster Steelcaster
After 20 years in academia, BOOK exloded the political nuances of my experience into raucous humor. I laughed til I couldn't laugh any more and I have given away multiple copies, including one to a University president.
SkroN SkroN
The produt arrived within the time limmits given and was in very good condition as stated by the seller. If I plan on purchasing more books online, I would definatly go through this seller again. I have been very pleased with the product and service.
Hunaya Hunaya
Presents on the surface as a murder mystery/thriller, but that is so not the point. The point is the most wonderful satire of literary theory since The Pooh Perplex, and of academic politics since, well, forever. Grudin has great fun playing around with language, couching different chapters in different voices (first, second, third), genres (narrative, nonfiction, drama, Q & A, etc.), marginal notes and footnotes (the footnotes attempt a takeover in Chapter 9, but are brutally suppressed--the marginalia tried to give warning!). I was going to ding Grudin a point for giving the novel Sovrana Sostrata a PR classification instead of a PS, but I take it back for the all-too-plausible postal abbrev for his fictional state of Washagon.
I have taught a number of courses on satire and am writing an essay on imaginary books. I have to say that this "novel" is among the most brilliant I've read, fit to shelve with Rabelais and his imaginary library as well as with Swift and his satire of pseudo-intellectuals. I cannot praise it highly enough and once embarrassed the author by babbling my admiration to him. He was gracious about it, though. I particularly recommend the footnotes and their uprising.