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eBook How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets ePub

eBook How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets ePub

by Garth Stein

  • ISBN: 1569474230
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Garth Stein
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Soho Press (May 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1314 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1807 kb
  • Other: mbr lrf txt azw
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 942

Description

Evan cocks his head, unsure how to take her response. But it doesn’t matter

Evan cocks his head, unsure how to take her response. But it doesn’t matter. Before he can think about it long, his request is granted. So casually he hangs his arm around Ellen’s neck and rests his head on her shoulder, turning slightly toward Evan, his green eyes blaring out from their sockets, screaming at Evan that I am yours, yes, I am of you, yes I am. I’m hot, Grandma, the young man complains. This is an old friend of your mother’s, Ellen says deliberately, almost forcing herself to say it, pushing through her misgivings. He’s come from Seattle to pay his respects.

Dean moves his head slightly-a move that might be construed as a nod-pushes back . Not like the many longstanding secrets he’s kept from his parents. Things that are too complicated to unravel at a single gathering. You might want to sit.

He hoists himself from the seat and trudges off, head hanging. Mica watches after him, then reluctantly stands and begins clearing the table. He’s upset with me for leaving, she says.

Evan faces his terrible secrets and must choose to understand and reveal them lest he leave them only half-buried. As in The Art of Racing in the Rain, Mr. Stein's prose is dialogue-driven, visual. I find his writing completely engaging and satisfying. Garth Stein is a talented writer with a vivid imagination, a wide range of experiences and extensive understanding of human nature. I have enjoyed his previous books and decided to read this one. If I had not read his previous books, the summary of the plot may have turned me off. Fortunately I enjoyed the book immensely.

He is reminded of himself, as he has spent long hours in exactly the same pose, thinking about things, or sometimes not thinking at all, just existing. It’s a good bed to exist on. Mica’s gone,. I guess we should talk. You lied about my mother. I didn’t lie- You lied! You’re a liar!. Dean heaves himself out of the bed and thunders past Evan, out into the living room. He goes into the kitchen and throws open the cabinets until he finds Evan’s stash of plastic shopping bags.

In How Even Broke his Head and Other Stories, Garth Stein puts an end to the silence. With cool and measured precision, he introduces us to Evan Wallace, epileptic, and then forces us to watch Evan's ever-so-slow drift toward the inevitable seizure

In How Even Broke his Head and Other Stories, Garth Stein puts an end to the silence. With cool and measured precision, he introduces us to Evan Wallace, epileptic, and then forces us to watch Evan's ever-so-slow drift toward the inevitable seizure. Along the way, somehow, we find ourselves hoping Evan's efforts to ward it off, control his grip on consciousness, will succeed because at stake is the love of his son - a son UNUSUAL SUBJECT HITS HARD. Epilepsy has rarely been examined in fiction. In How Even Broke his Head and Other Stories, Garth Stein puts an end to the silence.

Fathers never forget seeing their kids for the first time. But Evan is greeting his son, Dean, fourteen years late. The boy had been shuttled secretly to another city, along with his teenaged mother, while still a newborn. Now his mother has passed away, and Evan is it–Dad. An instant single parent. Instead of smiles and gurgles, Dean is full of snarls and resentment.

Garth Stein was born in Los Angeles on December 6, 1964, but spent most of his . How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets (Soho Press, 2005) - Winner of a 2006 PNBA Award.

Garth Stein was born in Los Angeles on December 6, 1964, but spent most of his childhood growing up in Seattle. His father, a Brooklyn native, was the child of Austrian Jewish immigrants, while Stein's Alaskan mother comes from Tlingit and Irish descent  . The Art of Racing in the Rain (HarperCollins, 2008) - A New York Times bestseller and winner of a 2009 PNBA Award.

Garth Stein, a former documentary filmmaker, was co-producer of an Academy Award-winning short film. Two character-driven tales conceived and penned by the same sensitive hand

Garth Stein, a former documentary filmmaker, was co-producer of an Academy Award-winning short film. He is the author of the bestselling The Art of Racing in the Rain and Raven Stole the Moon. Two character-driven tales conceived and penned by the same sensitive hand. How Evan Broke his Head and other secrets" is the story of Evan Wallace, 31-years old, a brilliant rock guitarist and musician living alone in his late grandfather's small apartment (with a terrific view). Evan is the son of a prominent Seattle heart surgeon and his obedient wife, and is the older brother to Charlie, a seemingly over-achieving attorney on the partner track.

Funny, bewitching, observant. - The Oregonian "Hits all the frets of a powerful story: sharp-witted dialogue, vivid characters, insight into medical challenges and prose that snaps like well-placed plucks of guitar strings. I hold up my lighter and turn it full-flame for Stein's latest work. Encore!"- The Seattle Times "Compelling.

“Funny, bewitching, observant.”—The Oregonian “Hits all the frets of a powerful story: sharp-witted dialogue, vivid characters, insight into medical challenges and prose that snaps like well-placed plucks of guitar strings. . . . I hold up my lighter and turn it full-flame for [Garth] Stein’s latest work. Encore!”—The Seattle Times “Compelling.”—Seattle Post-Intelligencer “Stein handles the many narrative elements deftly.”—Seattle Weekly “An engrossing family drama.”—Publishers Weekly Evan had a hit single, but that was ten years ago. Thirty-one now, he’s drifting, playing in a local band and teaching middle-aged men to coax music from an electric guitar. Beset at a young age with a life-threatening form of epilepsy, he’s kept his condition a secret. But his deepest secret is that he got his high school sweetheart pregnant. Then her conservative parents whisked her out of Seattle and out of Evan’s life. Now, fourteen years later, he experiences unplanned parenthood when he undertakes to raise the resentful teenage son he’s never known. Off beat and disarming, How Evan Broke His Head and Other Secrets portrays a contemporary American family with unfailing honesty.

Comments

Rarranere Rarranere
Evan is a real person. He is insecure and he lies to himself. It was pretty obvious to me that while he means well, he is unaware that he sees himself as a victim, and he gives authority to others to avoid responsibility. At the same time he is very hard on himself. AND...he is a good human being who really does want to be a good father. He grows. He learns. For me, that kind of character makes a good book. Also, the story is written in a way that doesn't just give all this info to you. You either see it or you don't. If you don't see it, the book may seem a little pointless. The style of writing is laid back, like listening to a guy you k snow telling you his story. The information about epilepsy rings true, though I don't know much about the subject so couldn't say. There was emotional sincerity that kept me turning the pages. I would like to read more from this author.
Zaryagan Zaryagan
I read this earlier novel after finishing Garth Stein's" The Art of Racing in the Rain." I find the two novels to be very different yet still sharing wonderful similarities. Two character-driven tales conceived and penned by the same sensitive hand.

"How Evan Broke his Head and other secrets" is the story of Evan Wallace, 31-years old, a brilliant rock guitarist and musician living alone in his late grandfather's small apartment (with a terrific view). Evan is the son of a prominent Seattle heart surgeon and his obedient wife, and is the older brother to Charlie, a seemingly over-achieving attorney on the partner track. Evan is damaged - he has suffered from epilepsy since age 12 when, on a dare, he ran in front of a car, was struck and nearly killed. Evan's epilepsy -- its cause and its symptoms -- is a major aspect of Evan's character. I am very affected by its full burden here and the steady courage Mr. Stein has discovered in Evan, the hero of this story.

In this novel, Evan discovers friends, family, love and opportunity hovering just out of reach. He finds a 14 year old son lost to him shortly after birth and chooses to embrace and care about the absent boy. He finds a woman who sees his worth and confronts him with it. Great responsibilities accompany parenthood; fear and confusion precede commitment; forgiveness accompanies a life that is not solitary. Evan faces his terrible secrets and must choose to understand and reveal them lest he leave them only half-buried. As in The Art of Racing in the Rain, Mr. Stein's prose is dialogue-driven, visual. I find his writing completely engaging and satisfying.

To quote the wise philosopher Enzo (from The Art of Racing in the Rain): "understanding the truth is simple; allowing oneself to experience it can sometimes be terrifically difficult."

All in all, a very cool book.
Lightbinder Lightbinder
Garth Stein is a talented writer with a vivid imagination, a wide range of experiences and extensive understanding of human nature. I have enjoyed his previous books and decided to read this one. If I had not read his previous books, the summary of the plot may have turned me off. Fortunately I enjoyed the book immensely.

The character development was terrific as always, but the introduction of epilepsy into the story made it significantly different and interesting. Family dynamics are always tricky and Stein knows how to describe them.

I did feel a little hanging at the end of the book, see what you think.
Xig Xig
This story isn't action packed, suspenseful, and is fairly predictable. But I liked it. It was just a good story with good messages about growing up, following through and owning responsibilities and mistakes.

The one sticking point for me was that I didn't really think that the major point of contention in Evan's mind was an issue to begin with. I did wrestle with that throughout the book. Maybe that was intentional on the part of the author - let Evan see it as a huge, life-altering issue and allow the reader to see it for what it was - virtually nothing at all. Don't want to go much deeper than that for fear of giving anything away.

Anyway, it's a different story than Racing in the Rain, although the same sort of writing style is present in both stories. For those who are familiar with Wally Lamb, these two authors remind me a lot of one another.
Yozshugore Yozshugore
I didn't know what to expect from this book. What I found was a story of a man who had never really learned who he was and who he could be until he met his fourteen year old son. From that day forward, Evan started to discover the story of his life, and that every story can be read in many ways by all of the people who are part of it. It was fun at times, heart-breaking at times, heart-warming, introspective, and insightful. I love the main characters, and I was rooting for them all the way -- even when they tried to themselves hateful, they captured my heart. I would - and will - recommend this to anyone who enjoys a good, thoughtful read that is totally enjoyable and thoroughly uplifting!
Yggdi Yggdi
Loved the story, complex characters, realistic relationships, and especially, sense of place. Seattle almost felt like a character. Ending was jarring and confusing or I would have given another star.