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eBook A Hologram for the King ePub

eBook A Hologram for the King ePub

by Dave Eggers

  • ISBN: 193636574X
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Dave Eggers
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: McSweeney's; First Edition edition (June 19, 2012)
  • Pages: 328
  • ePub book: 1670 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1435 kb
  • Other: lrf mobi doc docx
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 897

Description

A Hologram for the King takes us around the world to show how one man fights to hold himself and his . A Hologram for the King is an outstanding achievement in Eggers’s already impressive career, and an essential read. San Francisco Chronicle.

A Hologram for the King takes us around the world to show how one man fights to hold himself and his splintering family together in the face of the global economy’s gale-force winds. In a rising Saudi Arabian city. clear, supremely readable parable of America in the global economy that is haunting, beautifully shaped, and sa. .A story human enough to draw bloo.

All rights reserved, including right of reproduction. in whole or part in any form.

For more information about McSweeney’s: ww. csweeneys. All rights reserved, including right of reproduction. Cover art by Jessica Hische. This is a work of fiction. Though many of the places and companies mentioned in this book exist, all events depicted herein are fictional and should not be construed to be connected to any historical events or actual people, living or dead.

A Hologram for the King,’ by Dave Eggers. By PICO IYERJULY 19, 2012

A Hologram for the King,’ by Dave Eggers. By PICO IYERJULY 19, 2012. Dave Eggers comes from a much more sober, humbled, craft-­loving time, and his latest novel is the opposite of a failure: it’s a clear, supremely readable parable of America in the global economy that is haunting, beautifully shaped and sad. But for all the difference between their generations, you can feel in Eggers some of the hunger, the range and the unembarrassedly serious engagement with America and its ideals that gave Mailer’s work such force.

Dave Eggers elegantly dissects the outsourcing of the American Dream. Now comes A Hologram for the King

Dave Eggers elegantly dissects the outsourcing of the American Dream. Now comes A Hologram for the King. His first real novel since 2002's hectic and mostly unloved You Shall Know Our Velocity! is a sober, sincere, old-school novel with big social themes and, at its centre, an emblematic American – a salesman, no less, like Arthur Miller's Willy Loman or Sinclair Lewis's Babbit. Less typically, it's set in Saudi Arabia, and, being an Eggers book, it comes with nifty postmodern stylings, a clever central conceit and a gently absurdist plot. Alan Clay is a consultant.

Alan Clay, in Dave Eggers' A HOLOGRAM FOR THE KING, represents the next generation of contractor, still journeying to the forbidding and unfamiliar country to make fortunes by building prosaically named cities in places where no one in four thousand years had ever lived

Alan Clay, in Dave Eggers' A HOLOGRAM FOR THE KING, represents the next generation of contractor, still journeying to the forbidding and unfamiliar country to make fortunes by building prosaically named cities in places where no one in four thousand years had ever lived. Development of King Abdullah Economic City (KAEC, pronounced "cake") has been moving at a pace akin to say, an Alaskan golf course retirement community.

A Hologram for the King is a 2012 American novel written by Dave Eggers. In October 2012, the novel was announced as a finalist for the National Book Award. It was adapted as a film of the same name, released in 2016 and starring Tom Hanks and Sarita Choudhury. The novel tells the story of a washed-up, desperate American salesman, Alan Clay, who travels to Saudi Arabia to secure the IT contract from the royal government for a massive new complex being built in the middle of the desert.

A National Book Award Finalist, a New York Times bestseller and one of the most highly-acclaimed books of the year, A Hologram for the King is a sprawling novel about the decline of American industry from one of the most important, socially-aware novelists of our time. In a rising Saudi Arabian city, far from weary, recession-scarred America, a struggling businessman named Alan Clay pursues a last-ditch attempt to stave off foreclosure, pay his daughter's college tuition, and finally do something great.

In A Hologram for the King, Dave Eggers takes us around the world to show how one man fights to hold himself and his splintering family together in the face of the global economy’s gale-force winds. This taut, richly layered, and elegiac novel is a powerful evocation of our contemporary moment - and a moving story of how we got here. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Dave Eggers is the author of six previous books, including Zeitoun, winner of the American Book Award and the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. What Is the What was a finalist for the 2006 National Book Critics Circle Award and won France’s Prix Medici. That book, about Valentino Achak Deng, a survivor of the civil war in Sudan, gave birth to the Valentino Achak Deng Foundation, which operates a secondary school in South Sudan run by Mr. Deng.

Comments

Defolosk Defolosk
I was pleasantly surprised with this book after reading all of the negative reviews. Dave Eggers is an excellent writer but he is certainly capable of throwing out some duds. So that's what I was expecting here but I read it anyway, and it actually turned out to be a pretty darn good novel.

The first half is excellent, reading like a Kafkaesque adventure into a bizarre foreign land with strange customs and inhabitants. Then our character settles in a bit and the second half is a more standard novel along the lines of personal exploration.

Many of the characters are flat but writing characters has never been Eggers' strong suit. What is conveyed here is a mood, a sense of time and place. Specifically, an American who has found himself replaced by globalization and eventually machines. He has ventured out into the world expecting the olden days when the red carpet was rolled out because Americans were important and powerful. Instead he finds that we, as a nation, have been supplanted on the global scheme just as individuals all over the world are being supplanted by demand for cheaper labor and, eventually, no labor.

Definitely worth a read. I guess if you've been to Saudi Arabia you shouldn't expect this to be a precise accounting of that nation. It isn't meant to be. Saudi Arabia is simply meant to supply a very different (and yet in some way, not so different) kind of place. So try to set aside what might irk you about the novel and allow yourself to become immersed.
Leceri Leceri
In A HOLOGRAM FOR THE KING, sales guy Alan Clay is in Saudi Arabia in 2010 and trying to win an IT contract for a large American corporation. Clay is 54, divorced, in debt, and worried about a growth on his neck. He is also a shallow literary construction whose plight is never real, despite Egger's dogged effort to tie him to the very real decline in American manufacturing.

Eggers works in two ways to establish Clay's character. First, he has Clay, or some random person Clay knows or meets, bemoan the well-known predicament of American manufacturing. While these whinges enable the reader to see where Clay stands on the effects of globalization, his position is also identical to that in a thousand op-ed articles, where writers deplore the "hollowing out" of American industry. Unfortunately, Eggers has no special insight about this quandary. As a result, Clay, when he thinks big, is just a mouthpiece and cliché. He merely expresses or represents what is well known.

Eggers second strategy to create Alan Clay is to think small. In this case, he invents many vignettes--Clay interacting with his blue-collar father, Clay interacting with his impossible but idealistic wife, Clay interacting with his daughter--that give some specificity to his existence. The problem with this approach is that these vignettes, IMHO, never become greater than the parts. Instead, they are the merely recollections of the repining Clay who has experienced failure in his personal life.

This failure to establish believable character also extends to Egger's Saudis. Yousef, Clay's driver, for example, has spent a year at the University of Alabama in Birmingham. While he wears a thobe, he makes such off-key statements as: "That big statue of Vulcan, right? Scary" "Here we go. Full steam ahead!" Meanwhile, Salem, Yousef's guitar-playing friend, makes this American-sounding disclosure to Clay about Saudi Arabia. "But you'd be surprised. Half the women are on Prozac. And the men, like us, the energy leaks out in dangerous places."

In Eggers's Saudi Arabia, the natives, but for their clothing, are undistinguishable from Americans. Or, they are quick stereotypes of villagers, merchants, or thought police. I'm certainly no expert. But I recently read If Olaya Street Could Talk -- Saudi Arabia: The Heartland of Oil and Islam, an excellent memoir by a hospital executive who worked steadily in Saudi Arabia from 1978 to 2003. While this memoir is about many things, it does convey that a special people exist on the Arabian Peninsula who are trying to join modernity and great wealth with social and religious traditions. But in Eggers's simple world, everyone is stuck in the past or wants to be an American.

Ultimately, AHftK comes into focus as a romantic fantasy, with the depressed Clay starting to cope with his problems through the agency of Dr. Hakem. In this plot twist, an out-of-shape, boozing, and marginal American, who has undertaken surgery on his own body, suddenly becomes hot stuff. In some respects, this is the most unbelievable development in an unbelievable book. Still, it will provide a great end for the movie.

One final point: Eggers does that annoying Vonnegut thing, where he breaks up his text into tiny paragraphs. Here, I turn arbitrarily to page 61, where there are four paragraph clumps. But, nope, these clumps read as continuous narrative and the spacing is unnecessary. On page 265... three clumps, which once again scan as a single narrative line. This spacing tic pervades the entire book and adds nothing.

I round up to three-stars in tribute to the many good deeds of Dave Eggers.

Tom Hanks, BTW, is 56, about the right age to play Alan Clay.
DEAD-SHOT DEAD-SHOT
This is the story of Alan Clay who travels to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia in May, 2010. He is the proprietor of a small, failing consulting firm run from his home in the U.S., but has recently been staked by Reliant, the largest IT supplier in the world, to sell a contract to King Abdullah. Clay, a salesman by nature, has brought three young assistants who will present a holographic teleconference to impress the king with their skills in telecommunications. Clay is 54 and feels that his life has been a series of foolish decisions, hasn't planned well, hadn't had courage when he needed it. This could be his last chance to pay off his debts and provide for his daughter's education.

One particular incident back in the U.S. haunted Clay. He had noticed, while driving past a cold lake near his home, that his annoying next-door neighbor was wading into the lake. Clay didn't stop to see what was going on, figuring that since the man was a Transcendentalist he was probably communing with nature. His neighbor had kept going deeper and froze to death, a suicide.

His adventures in Jeddah and surrounding areas are amusing as the reader witnesses Clay interact with his team and the residents of the region. What's really compelling is the description of life in 1910 Saudi Arabia, something we don't often have the chance to read about. The plot is full of interesting interactions, and the reader is totally engaged, hoping that Clay will stop being a buffoon.
Keath Keath
I really liked Dave Eggers modernization of Arthur Miller's classic, Death of a Salesman. Willy Loman was "lost" as his expectations of his world shattered; he lost his job, his favorite son Biff dropped out of college, his affair was discovered and his ordinary life fell far short of the American Dream. Eggers brings Alan, divorced, job jumping, worried about his daughter Kit's tuition payments, making his last attempt at success by hosting a video hologram presentation in Saudi Arabia to the King. In his flashbacks we learn how instrumental Alan was in outsourcing manufacturing bicycles and realizes to his horror that he is next. Willy drove his car into a tree, Alan decides there is nothing left for him in America.