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eBook Jack Spicer's Detective Novel: The Tower of Babel ePub

eBook Jack Spicer's Detective Novel: The Tower of Babel ePub

by Jack Spicer

  • ISBN: 1883689058
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jack Spicer
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Talisman House Pub (February 1, 1994)
  • Pages: 169
  • ePub book: 1498 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1340 kb
  • Other: lrf mbr mbr mobi
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 635

Description

An established writer from an Eastern college returning to his former San Francisco haunts becomes entangled in a labyrinthine series of events that culminate in the sudden violent death of a respected poet.

Spicer's sense of San Francisco, Berkeley & Sausalito is wry, spot o. There are basically three sorts of readers who will pick up Jack Spicer's posthumously published, unfinished detective novel, THE TOWER OF BABEL

Spicer's sense of San Francisco, Berkeley & Sausalito is wry, spot on. The opening scene is set in the renamed premises of his hangout, The Place, on Upper Grant, where he would later create Blabbermouth Night, when anyone could hold the stage till the denizens would tell them to shut u. There are basically three sorts of readers who will pick up Jack Spicer's posthumously published, unfinished detective novel, THE TOWER OF BABEL.

Jack Spicer (January 30, 1925 – August 17, 1965) was an American poet often identified with the San Francisco Renaissance. In 2009, My Vocabulary Did This to Me: The Collected Poetry of Jack Spicer won the American Book Award for poetry. Born as John Lester Spicer on January 30, 1925 in Los Angeles to Dorothy Clause and John Lovely Spicer. He graduated from Fairfax High School in 1942, and attended the University of Redlands from 1943–1945.

The Tower of Babel book. Spicer's attempt at a novel is, appropriately, cryptic, furious, and bitchy. Start by marking The Tower of Babel as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. His prose is actually pretty great- he learned a lot from the stacks of pulp novels he kept around, I guess, and its a bizarrely elegant incorporation of all of his metaphysical fixations into a kind of sort of detective story (nobody really commits a crime until about 80% of the way through).

Are you sure you want to remove The Tower of Babel. At head of title: Jack Spicer's detective novel. Jack Spicer's detective novel. from your list? The Tower of Babel. 169 p. ; Number of pages.

Jack Spicer's biography and life story

Jack Spicer's biography and life story. Jack Spicer was an American poet often identified with the San Francisco Renaissance. Since the posthumous publication of The Collected Books of Jack Spicer (first published in 1975), his popularity and influence has steadily risen, affecting poetry throughout the United States, Canada, and Europe. In 1994, The Tower of Babel: Jack Spicer's Detective Novel was published.

In 1994, The Tower of Babel: Jack Spicer’s Detective Novel was published. The Collected Books of Jack Spicer. A Book Of Correspondences For Jack Spicer. Black Sparrow Press, 1975.

San Francisco (Calif. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Tracey Gutierres on October 11, 2013.

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Spicer left Berkeley after losing his teaching assistantship in the linguistics department for his refusal to sign a. .The Tower of Bable: Detective Novel, 1994. The House That Jack Built: The Collected Lectures of Jack Spicer, 1998 (ed. by Peter Gizzi).

Spicer left Berkeley after losing his teaching assistantship in the linguistics department for his refusal to sign a "Loyalty Oath," a provision of the Sloan-Levering Act that required all California state employees in 1950 to swear their loyalty to the United States. He briefly moved to Minnesota where a sympathetic professor helped him get a job in linguistics. Poet Be Like God: Jack Spicer and the San Francisco Renaissance, by Lew Ellingham and Kevin Killian, 1998.

Comments

Captain America Captain America
A choice, satiric tale about the late 50s San Francisco poetry & arts scene after it had been discovered & publicized throughout America, usually lumped into"Beat," by one of the founders of its predecessor, the Berkeley Renaissance of the late 40s--& one of postwar America's truly unique poets. It has the partial air of a roman á clef, but whatever foreknowledge the reader brings to it, picks up along the way, or finds out later will add to their pleasure. Its unfinished status really doesn't matter; it's a completely satisfying read. Spicer's sense of San Francisco, Berkeley & Sausalito is wry, spot on. The opening scene is set in the renamed premises of his hangout, The Place, on Upper Grant, where he would later create Blabbermouth Night, when anyone could hold the stage till the denizens would tell them to shut up. (A few years earlier, he & his collaborator-students at the San Francisco Art Institute founded the SixGallery on Fillmore near Union, where Ginsberg famously read "Howl" to Kerouac's cheerleading, along with McClure, Snyder, Whalen & Lamantia, introduced by Rexroth. Spicer was out of town ... ) "West coast is something nobody with sense would understand ..., " Spicer wrote (& Richard Brautigan quoted). "We are a coast people/There is nothing but ocean out beyond us. We grasp/The first thing coming." Filmmaker Raúl Ruiz ('Time Regained,' "Mysteries of Lisbon"), who admired Spicer's poetry, hoped to make a movie adaptation of 'Tower of Babel.' "I saw the same thing happen in Chile," he said, "The politicization of a Bohemian art scene through publicity."
Camper Camper
There are basically three sorts of readers who will pick up Jack Spicer's posthumously published, unfinished detective novel, THE TOWER OF BABEL. First of all, of course, are mystery enthusiasts, of which Spicer himself was one (as it explains in the afterword: Hammett and Chandler were particular favorites of his). Second, readers with an interest in the poets and artists of the San Francisco Renaissance of the 1950s and '60's--TOWER OF BABEL is both a portrait of that scene, and a critique of it. Finally, anyone who is an enthusiast for Spicer's strange, hermetic, brilliant poetry will want to see what he was like as a prose writer.
Of the three readers, perhaps only the mystery enthusiast will be disappointed, because TOWER OF BABEL--like Charles Dickens' MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD--if unfinished. But the writing is very fine, witty, discerning--poets often make the best novelists, because of their care for individual words, individual sentences--and Spicer's characterizations are brilliant. My favorite is Henry, the one-armed letter-writer. Anyway, find it and read it. And, as the editors suggest, make up your own ending.