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eBook Lightning Field: A Novel ePub

eBook Lightning Field: A Novel ePub

by Dana Spiotta

  • ISBN: 0743212614
  • Category: United States
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Dana Spiotta
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Scribner; First Edition edition (July 31, 2001)
  • Pages: 224
  • ePub book: 1281 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1449 kb
  • Other: docx doc mbr lrf
  • Rating: 4.7
  • Votes: 641

Description

Dana Spiotta (born 1966) is an American author. Her novel Stone Arabia (2011) was a National Book Critics Circle Award finalist.

Dana Spiotta (born 1966) is an American author. Her novel Eat the Document (2006) was a National Book Award finalist and won the Rosenthal Foundation Award from the American Academy of Arts and Letters. Her novel Lightning Field (2001) was a New York Times Notable Book of the year. She was a recipient of the Rome Prize in Literature, a Guggenheim Fellowship and a New York Foundation for the Arts Fellowship.

The novel beautifully manifests Ms. Spiotta's gift for transforming her keen cultural intelligence into haunting, evocative prose. -Jennifer Egan, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning A Visit from the Goon Squad

The Los Angeles Dana Spiotta evokes in her bold and strangely lyrical first novel is a land of Spirit Gyms and Miracle Miles, a great centerless place where chains of reference get lost, or finally don't matter.

The Los Angeles Dana Spiotta evokes in her bold and strangely lyrical first novel is a land of Spirit Gyms and Miracle Miles, a great centerless place where chains of reference get lost, or finally don't matter. Mina lives with her screenwriter husband and works at her best friend Lorene's highly successful concept restaurants, which exploit the often unconscious desires and idiosyncrasies of a rich, chic clientele. Almost inadvertently, Mina has acquired two lovers.

The main characters of Dana Spiotta's magnificent second novel, Eat the Document, they were once in love, but . Spiotta never lets the novel feel like a history lesson or a diatribe

The main characters of Dana Spiotta's magnificent second novel, Eat the Document, they were once in love, but spend all but a few pages of the book intentionally distant and out of ves after executing a political bombing in the '70s that went awry. Spiotta never lets the novel feel like a history lesson or a diatribe. Its social critique is enacted chiefly through Nash (the former Bobby), whose resistance has mellowed to amused observance of the radical Seattle youth who frequent the independent lefty bookstore he runs. Nash redefines the term "activist" by facilitating a number of brilliantly conceived groups that rarely execute their plans. The Los Angeles Dana Spiotta evokes in her bold and strangely lyrical first novel is a land of Spirit Gyms and Miracle Miles, a great centerless place where chains of reference get lost, or finally don't matter.

Lightning Field: A Novel. Lightning Field - Dana Spiotta. One Month Before Leaving: The Cocktail Hour.

How will a Dragon Spirit holder survive? The story takes place in Douluo Dalu one and the MC doesn't know the story of Douluo Dalu and he will be completely unaware of the story as he had never read the novel of Douluo Dalu. Well, the pairings for this novel are mc x rongrong. Don’t wanna miss every update of the story?

The Los Angeles Dana Spiotta evokes in her bold and strangely lyrical first novel is. . rich, funny, learned, and tonally fresh" (Jeffrey Eugenides), comes a novel about aspiration, film, work, and love.

Lightning Field book. Mina lives with her screenwriter husband and works at her best friend Lorene's highly successful concept restaurants, which exploit the often unconscious desires.

The Los Angeles Dana Spiotta evokes in her first novel is a land of Spirit Gyms and Miracle Miles, a great centerless place where chains of reference get lost, or finally don't matter.Mina lives with her screenwriter husband and works at her best friend Lorene's highly successful concept restaurants, which exploit the often unconscious desires and idiosyncrasies of a rich, chic clientele. Almost inadvertently, Mina has acquired two lovers. And then there are the other men in her life: her father, a washed-up Hollywood director living in a yurt and hiding from his debtors, and her disturbed brother, Michael, whose attempts to connect with her force Mina to consider that she might still have a heart - if only she could remember where she had left it.Between her Spiritual Exfoliation and Detoxification Therapies and her elaborate devotion to style, Lorene is interested only in charting her own perfection and impending decay. Although supremely confident in a million shallow ways, she, too, starts to fray at the edges.And there is Lisa, a loving mother who cleans house, scrapes by, and dreams of food terrorists and child abductors, until even the most innocent events seem to hint at dark possibilities.

Comments

Clonanau Clonanau
Mina walks in L.A., and that may be one of the few things distinguishing her from the trend-conscious scenesters in the Axis of Evil that is Hollywood-Beverly Hills-Bel Air. The daughter of a has-been film director, she is married, but both she and her husband are having affairs—on her part, two somewhat unsatisfactory flings that often cause her to be late for work. (Then again, even sans sex, she is pretty much late for everything.) Her brother is nuts (certified), which in Los Angeles earns one a merit badge. She manages a restaurant for her best friend, Lorena, who owns a series of chic eateries known more for offering “ironic service” and “vision of pleasure” rather than for serving anything that might contain (shudder) calories. Meanwhile, Lorena’s cleaning woman, who has an abusive husband, two twin daughters, and an Amber Alert obsession, stars in her own beside-the-point subplot, seemingly to make the concerns of the shallownistas seem even more petty than they are—no mean task, that.

Ultimately, however, you wouldn’t read “Lightning Field” for its characters, who are mostly Central Casting stereotypes. Likewise, what might be teased out for a storyline won’t be remembered after you’ve closed the book—except, perhaps, the scene where Mina’s brother swallows their father’s entire stash of cocaine. What we have here is yet another not-quite-tired satire of the less-than-zero Hollywood set, with its checklist of trendy things that must be skewered in such a novel: gym culture, vegetarianism, “molded-celluloid blue-tinted vintage sunglasses,” breast augmentation, movies (Mina can turn everything—and I mean everything—into a film reference), earthquakes, holistic treatments (Talk-n-Touch Advance Well-Being Therapy, Tactile Hue Therapy, et al.), shopping, and feng shui (natch).

Like her many predecessors over the last half century (beginning with the likes of Darcy O’Brien, Thomas Tryon, and Gore Vidal), Spiotta fires away at a sequence of slow-crawling, well-dinged carnivalesque targets. Another reviewer, praising this novel, compared it to Bret Easton Ellis’s “Glamorama”—a dreadful, tedious book I found more haughty than sardonic. “Lightning Field” resembles Ellis only at its worst; when Spiotta’s chic knowingness threatens to become the very thing she is mocking—a sense of inborn superiority. Instead, what really what distinguishes “Lightning Field” from being another dime-a-dozen Los Angeles satire is Spiotta’s poetic, cryptic, experimental prose. Working through it can be a challenge, as the perspective zooms among various characters, places, and periods, but the payoff is when you come across a scene or a quip told in a manner so strikingly funny and original that you’ll forgive the book’s many clichés and its barrelfish targets.
Detenta Detenta
On the basis of having just finished this first novel by Dana Spiotta, I must say I'm really looking forward to reading her second & third novels (so far). I don't need to spell out the ways that Spiotta is brilliant, because the other positive reviews on this page are spot on: check out, in particular, the one quoting "bang & banish" and the one about the "objective correlative"--an apropos concept not only for the artwork of the lightning field that provides the title but also for the movies streaming through the overstuffed brains of bright Angelenos (Angelenas?) like Mina and Lorene. Even the qualified and negative reviews are helpful in making your decision about whether to read this book, because if you're not the sort of person who enjoys an in-depth exploration of the quirky lives of intelligent yet shallow inhabitants of La-La Land, maybe you shouldn't bother with _Lightning Field_. Think again, though, if you have enjoyed movies or T.V. shows about L.A. ("Six Feet Under," for example, I thought about more than once as Spiotta delved into Mina's complex family dynamics & her equally complex sex life.) You might find, as I did, you have something to learn from Spiotta. Just because the characters are oddly constricted in their outlook on reality--perhaps I should say "reality" =laugh= --doesn't mean the author is!

I'll take issue with just two opinions posted in the customer reviews to date:
(1) that Spiotta's male characters have no depth: we may not learn as much about them as the three female principals, but they each get their unique and nuanced slice of the novelistic pie. Even the male walk-ons are vividly human.
(2) that Spiotta's style isn't like anyone else's: I found her prose very reminiscent of Don DeLillo (e.g., _White Noise_) and even somewhat like Bret Easton Ellis (e.g., _Glamorama_) for the first 50 pages or so. But gradually Spiotta shakes off her influences and develops her own voice. And how delightful it is to finally (finally!) find a FEMALE fiction writer who is in the same league as DeLillo, a writer who has a female perspective on the experiences of women, both cultural and biological, in our fraught society. (Yes, there's Joan Didion, but her good stuff is nonfiction--a different sort of animal.)

Last but not least, let me give you a quotation: "The walk up Franklin facing the Hollywood Hills was eerie and quiet this early. There were hot, dry blasts of wind, the late-summer Santa Anas that made the city feel strange. Hot paradoxical winds--winds that made you sweat. Mina felt the sirocco blast of air, an undercurrent of desert. Perfect weather for an exit. The air felt heavy and pushy, hot, sudden northern blows that Raymond Chandler called red winds. Well, he ought to know, and it felt that way, red and hot and skewed, as if it might blow the pages of a calender back, the introduction of a flashback, an incantation to time slips. Mina stood at Hollywood and Franklin and looked back dowm, listening to tiny pieces of paper swirling in the street. The dawn light deflected and diffused, a fighting orange, a growing umbery red. The wind was red because you could feel the tabloid bloodrush of the city in it, a cracked Southern California creepiness that came from desert and sun and all its golden promise. You could feel Manson at the edges, and fires and riots combusting from within, and the funny way the city always seemed primed for retribution."

A city that offers promise but is primed for retribution...but no redemption, not yet at least. That also describes the novelist, I think. I can't wait to read her next one!
Coiwield Coiwield
I learned about Ms Spiotta's work because she was part of a discussion panel on David Foster Wallace and she came across as unpretentious and thoughtful. I became curious enough about her work and decided that it was feasible and worthy to read her work from the beginning so I bought this book. It struck me the level of detail and effort to convey accurately a feeling or idea by the author-and she succeeds in her effort. It is also highly pleasing her capacity to write about human intimacy without getting sentimental or vulgar. I ended up buying all of her books written so far and I'm looking forward to read the next one.
Zainian Zainian
Lightning Field is Dana Spiotta's first novel which she wrote while working at a restaurant and most people likely will not have read this-although they likely will have read her more recent Stone Arabia which was a great book. Lightning Field was ok but not great. The book takes place in Los Angeles and does a good job describing really how people live in that part of the US. Carefree with ever changing relationships . We learn of Mina who lives with her husband who is a struggling screenwriter. Mina has a very regular love and a less regular lover. Her friend Leone owns a very successful restaurant and struggles with living in LA. She wants to be on the move. We also learn about Lisa who is poor and cleans houses including Leones. MIna has a brother Michael who has a fairly drug-infested and cigarette burned body. These characters independently are interesting and the book ebbs and flows from the lives of one to the other. I don't think the book necessarily holds together well although when you go from the stories of one to the other they are independently interesting. I recommend the book for fans of Dana Spiotta who want to read her entire body of work.