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eBook Myths And Folk Tales Of The Russians, Western Slavs, And Magyars (Notable American Authors Series - Part I) ePub

eBook Myths And Folk Tales Of The Russians, Western Slavs, And Magyars (Notable American Authors Series - Part I) ePub

by Jeremiah Curtin

  • ISBN: 0781224977
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jeremiah Curtin
  • Publisher: Reprint Services Corp (January 1890)
  • ePub book: 1751 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1123 kb
  • Other: lrf azw mbr doc
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 851

Description

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Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. All 32 tales are derived from sources in Russia and nearby regions. Selections include 20 Russian stories such as Ivan Tsarevich, the Fire-bird, and the Gray Wolf, Vassilissa Golden Tress, Bareheaded Beauty, and Yelena the Wise ; six Slavic (Czech or Chekh ) tales, including The King of the Toads, The Cuirassier and the Horned Princess, and The Treacherous Brothers ; and six fables of Magyar (Hungarian) origin, including The Reed Maiden, Mirko, the King’s Son

And now I'm done with Jeremiah Curtin's "Myths and Folk-Tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars", and I've had an enthusiastic time reading these collections of Russian, Czech, and Hungarian tales

And now I'm done with Jeremiah Curtin's "Myths and Folk-Tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars", and I've had an enthusiastic time reading these collections of Russian, Czech, and Hungarian tales.

Author(s): Jeremiah Curtin. Published May 28th 2015 by Library of Alexandria. ISBN: 0486409058 (ISBN13: 9780486409054). Author(s): Jeremiah Curtin.

Chekh Myths And Folk-Tales. Boyislav, Youngest Of Twelve.

Letters in the Russian names and titles in this volume have the following values: - In this volume Russian names and titles without printed accents are accented on the penult. Chekh Myths And Folk-Tales. ONCE there was a king who groaned many a day; doctors came from far and near, but they could not cure him.

Authors: Jeremiah Curtin. Categories: Nonfiction. This book includes 32 myths among which it is possible to name the following: "Yelena the Wise," "The King of the Toads," "The Reed Maiden," "Ivan Tsarevich, the Fire-bird, and the Gray Wolf" and some others. The book would be interesting and useful for children and adults who want to have a couple of hours of entertaining reading as well as for those readers who study the myths and fairy tales of this particular region. MoreLess Show More Show Less.

Reproduction of the original: Myths and Folk-tales of the Russians .

Reproduction of the original: Myths and Folk-tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars by Jeremiah Curtin. This is a great book to have for people interested in Russian and Slavic fairy tales. One person found this helpful. And now I'm done with Jeremiah Curtin's "Myths and Folk-Tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars", and I've had an enthusiastic time reading these collections of Russian, Czech, and Hungarian tales.

Myths and Folk Tales of Ireland. Native American Creation Myths. On the bookshelvesAll. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

Folk Tales From the Russian. Verra Xenophontovna Kalamatiano de Blumenthal. Child Christopher and Goldilind the Fair. L'Allegro, Il Penseroso, Comus, and Lycidas. The Mongols in Russia. A Journey in Southern Siberia: The Mongols, Their Religion and Their Myths. Tales Of The Fairies And Of The Ghost World.

Comments

Urtte Urtte
This is an odd Five-Star rating because the stories themselves are written so poorly, they cannot simply be read out loud and enjoyed. Curtain moves from past to present tense frequently; at times it is like he is telling a story, and then in the next paragraph it is more like he is presenting the outline of a story. That being said, the stories are fantastic: many are collected in other collections, but in the Curtain versions, there are some details and plot lines that I have not found in other versions, and I also found a few stories that were completely new to me and were terrific. This is a great book to have for people interested in Russian and Slavic fairy tales.
Eng.Men Eng.Men
I am an individual who's learning about Russia (from the ancient times to the Soviet Era). I've already finished "The Early Slavs" by P.M. Barford and "Land of the Firebird" by Suzanne Massie. And now I'm done with Jeremiah Curtin's "Myths and Folk-Tales of the Russians, Western Slavs, and Magyars", and I've had an enthusiastic time reading these collections of Russian, Czech, and Hungarian tales. Almost all of the stories have a formulaic plot (boy sets out to search for an animal or a princess, boy is betrayed by a close friend or relative, I won't go on from there because you'll have to read it all yourself to see what happens next) and a formulaic obstacle (the colors bronze, silver, and gold are shown as a daring choice). Talking animals are common, and men with Godlike powers have enemies that are far more puwerful than them. You'll sometimes be disappointed with the stereotypical happy endings, but the stories overall will give you continuous pleasure. Recommended for any who are interested in Russia's mythology and folklore, or any who are looking for a short story to read during your thirty-minute lunch break at work.
Malodred Malodred
I use these and similar stories in my work, and the introductions and foreward were very instructive. I was impressed at the speed of delivery from the states.
Grosho Grosho
Something went wrong with the printing. Page headers etc will appear in the middle of the text. It creates a disorienting effect, especially as the hard breaks for page ends don't line up with this printing.

In short you get something like this:
"And then William went to the park to see his SLAVIC MYTH | THE MYTH OF WILLIAM THE PARK GOER
PG 29brother who had also gone to the park."

If you can work around that it's fine, but it's more disorienting than you'd expect.