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eBook Heir: A Love Story (Short Story Index Reprint Series) ePub

eBook Heir: A Love Story (Short Story Index Reprint Series) ePub

by Vita Sackville-West,Victoria Sackville-West

  • ISBN: 0836937317
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Vita Sackville-West,Victoria Sackville-West
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Ayer Co Pub (June 1, 1922)
  • Pages: 122
  • ePub book: 1383 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1435 kb
  • Other: mbr azw lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.1
  • Votes: 781

Description

Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, CH (9 March 1892 – 2 June 1962), usually known as Vita Sackville-West, was an English poet, novelist, and garden designer.

Victoria Mary Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson, CH (9 March 1892 – 2 June 1962), usually known as Vita Sackville-West, was an English poet, novelist, and garden designer. She was a successful novelist, poet, and journalist, as well as a prolific letter writer and diarist. She published more than a dozen collections of poetry during her lifetime and 13 novels.

Vita Sackville-West subtitled The Heir; A Love Story and it is just that-a love story about the land, its people, a. .While married to the diplomat Harold Nicolson, she conducted a series of scandalous amorous liaisons with many women, including the brilliant Virginia Woolf.

Vita Sackville-West subtitled The Heir; A Love Story and it is just that-a love story about the land, its people, a house, and a time and traditions that were fading away. Vita Sackville-West said that it reflected her own mood of melancholy in 1921, but by the very surprising close I felt not sadness, but satisfaction and a sort of gently amused delight. It's that sort of book. They had an open marriage.

Books by V Victoria Sackville West: The Heir a Love Story. The Heir a Love Story.

Vita Sackville-West, an aristocrat from a long and distinguished British lineage, delighted in the colorful mingling of Spanish and gypsy blood, with which she was endowed through the unusual circumstances of her maternal ancestors. She often portrayed herself as a hot-blooded irrational being, a fantasy played out in her acting the part of Julian or Mitya for her various lovers-in particular Violet Keppel Trefusis, who represents Eve to Vita’s dark, romantic, masculine gypsy side.

The heir; a love story. The heir; a love story. by. Sackville-West, V. (Victoria), 1892-1962. New York, George H. Doran company.

Poet and novelist Vita Sackville-West began writing as a child. Born at elegant Knole Castle, scene of Virginia Woolf's novel Orlando (1928), Sackville-West was educated in that 365-room dwelling. In 1913 she married Harold Nicolson (see Vol. 3), journalist, diplomat, and biographer. Despite Nicolson's homosexuality and her own lesbian affair with Violet Trefusis, this marriage survived. All of her writings reflect the same unhurried approach, deep reflection, and brilliantly polished style.

Author: V. (Victoria) Sackville-West Title: The heir; a love story Publisher: New York, George H. Description: The heir. Challenge by V. (Victoria) Sackville-West Heritage by V. (Victoria) Sackville-West An Ideal Husband by Oscar Wilde Orchard and vineyard by V. (Victoria) Sackville-West Rain : and other stories by W. Somerset Maugham Poems of West & East by V. (Victoria) Sackville-West The Mysterious Affair at Styles by Agatha Christie The dragon in shallow waters by V. (Victoria) Sackville-West Marjorie at.

Not to be confused with Victoria Sackville-West. Vita Sackville-West, Lady Nicolson. Christened Victoria Mary Sackville-West, the girl was known as "Vita" throughout her life to distinguish her from her mother. The usual English aristocratic inheritance customs were followed by the Sackville-West family, which prevented Vita from inheriting Knole on the death of her father, which became a source of life-long bitterness.

British novelist, poet, and gardener Victoria Mary Sackville-West was . Additional volumes of Sackville-West’s correspondence include Dearest Andrew: Letters from V. Sackville-West to Andrew Reiber.

British novelist, poet, and gardener Victoria Mary Sackville-West was raised at her family’s ancestral estate, Knole, in Kent. Sackville-West is also known for her personal and literary connections to members of the Bloomsbury Group of writers, including Virginia Woolf.

Such a good book-just like you are walking through the house with vita herself telling you all the wonderful stories.

Comments

Sat Sat
Vita Sackville-West was a woman of great loves, and one of her most passionate was for old English architecture. She lived in no less than three great Renaissance homes in Kent: Knole, the magnificent home of her family for centuries, and one of the largest manor homes in England; Long Barn, the large multi-family house dating back to the fourteenth century that she and her husband Harold Nicolson first moved to in 1913; and finally Sissinghurst Castle, another great Elizabeth manor house she and Nicolson bought together at the height of her career (and which they turned into the most resplendent garden house in England). Naturally she wrote about her great love of such houses (and, by extension, of England itself) in many of her works of literature. One of the most charming is this novella back in print in a beautiful edition from Hesperus.

Originally printed in a limited edition of only a few hundred, THE HEIR imagines the situation of a middle-class Wolverhampton man who has found himself in position of an incredible white elephant: a small Elizabeth manor house, dark and inconvenient, but almost perfect of its kind. Its magnificence and untenability are emblematized by the many peacocks screaming in its gardens as they tear them to bits, and the house agent is certain that Mr. Chase, the eponymous protagonist, will destroy the peacocks and sell the home. Obviously he won't, in the end, and the novella doesn't build much narrative suspense in that regard, but what is more interesting is seeing how Chase comes to decide he cannot bear to part with his new inheritance. Sackville-West's elegant power of description, so striking in all her other writing, is here very nicely displayed, and "Blackboys" (the house in question) is beautifully described perhaps more fully than even many of the other most famous houses in British literature(including Howards End or Mansfield Park, even though those houses belong to more profound works of fiction).
Enone Enone
A very good novella. She has a way with breaking down characters so well that you can see into their very soul. You understand who to love, and who you absolutely dislike. Loved it!