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eBook Wolf Solent ePub

eBook Wolf Solent ePub

by Robertson Davies,John Cowper Powys

  • ISBN: 0060911638
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Robertson Davies,John Cowper Powys
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (September 1, 1984)
  • Pages: 613
  • ePub book: 1455 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1114 kb
  • Other: mobi lit lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.8
  • Votes: 138

Description

John Cowper Powys (/ˈkuːpər ˈpoʊɪs/; 8 October 1872 – 17 June 1963) was a British philosopher, lecturer, novelist, literary critic, and poet.

John Cowper Powys (/ˈkuːpər ˈpoʊɪs/; 8 October 1872 – 17 June 1963) was a British philosopher, lecturer, novelist, literary critic, and poet. Powys was born in Shirley, Derbyshire, where his father was vicar of St. Michael and All Angels Parish Church, between 1871 and 1879. Although Powys published a collection of poems in 1896 and his first novel in 1915, he did not gain success as a writer until he published the novel Wolf Solent in 1929.

This book is darker, told through the perspective of the eponymous main character who resembles Powys himself not a little (.

The author writes prose that is always on the threshold of poetry- sacramental, mesmerizing, of relentless power. - George Gurley, The Kansas City Star. This book is darker, told through the perspective of the eponymous main character who resembles Powys himself not a little (. Powys's Autobiography), but it still has the trademark mystagogic prose that is unmatched in literature.

com's John Cowper Powys Author Page.

When it was first published in 1929, John Cowper Powys's rapturous novel of eros and ideas was compared with works by Shakespeare, Thomas Hardy, and . Since then it has won the admiration of writers from Henry Miller to Iris Murdoch.

My ‘mythology’ has been my real life. "Wolf Solent" in the novel Wolf Solent by John Cowper Poweys.

His mother was descended from the poet William Cowper, hence his middle .

His mother was descended from the poet William Cowper, hence his middle name. His two younger brothers, Llewelyn Powys and Theodore Francis Powys, also became well-known writers. Other brothers and sisters also became prominent in the arts. John studied at Sherborne School and Corpus Christi College, Cambridge, and became a teacher and lecturer; as lecturer, he worked first in England, then in continental Europe and finally in the USA, where he lived in the years 1904-1934.

John Cowper Powys is a challenging author with an impressive list of admirers. In addition to George Steiner, these have included Robertson Davies, Margaret Drabble, Theodore Dreiser, Henry Miller, J. B. Priestley and Angus Wilson. Библиографические данные.

Many of the earliest books, particularly those dating back to the 1900s and before, are now extremely scarce and increasingly expensive. First published in 1929, John Cowper Powys's novel of Eros and ideas was compared with works by Shakespeare, Thomas Hardy, and .

Wolf Solent (Penguin Modern Classics) (Paperback). Authors: Powys, John Cowper. Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd. Binding: Paperback. Read full description. Wolf Solent by John Cowper Powys (Paperback, 2000). Brand new: lowest price.

Often described as one of the great apocalyptic novels of our time, "Wolf Solent" is the story of a young man returning from London to work near to the school at which his father had been history master. Complex, romantic and humorous, it is a classic work combining a close understanding of man's everyday experience with a delicate awareness of the spiritual.

Comments

Vrion Vrion
Like the one-star reviewer I found it difficult, to start. I'd owned one or another of his novels since reading his Autobiography (and other non-fiction; Visions and Revisions, and Rabelais) ~ten years ago. So, I was pretty sure that I wanted to read his novels. And the ice finally broke. I was well and slowly along before I realized that I don't usually read novels, but that I was doing so because I liked to read Powys think. The story (as I expect will be the case in the rest of them) is mere framework for John to expound, not on the nature that is part of us, but on the nature of which we are part.
Rayli Rayli
This is my third Powys novel, after The Glastonbury Romance and Weymouth Sands. I still think Weymouth Sounds the best, representing what Powys called "elementalism" (his own particular form of animism) and a magical, kaleidoscopic whirl of poetic prose seen through the mind's eye of several characters. This book is darker, told through the perspective of the eponymous main character who resembles Powys himself not a little (q.v. Powys's Autobiography), but it still has the trademark mystagogic prose that is unmatched in literature. The other reviewers have done a thorough job of painting the setting and characters. So, I'll just add a quote to give the potential reader an idea of what s/he is in for here:

" ` Don't you ever feel,' he said, `as if one part of your soul belonged to a world altogether different from this world - as if it were completely disillusioned about all the things that people make such a fuss over and yet were involved in something important?'" p.239

If you've ever had intimations of this sort, you'll love this book...and the rest of Powys's novels I might add.

As a footnote, for those interested, the last chapter presents a very droll description of Bertrand Russell in the character of Lord Carfax. Powys and Lord Russell were near contemporaries and neighbours in Wales. They often debated each other in America, and remained on very good terms, despite their diametrically opposite philosophies.
Zorve Zorve
I love this novel its slightly dated but gives great insight into the mind set of the time. Not much happens but if you like your novels cerebral with the odd cup of tea you will love this under rated author.
Andromakus Andromakus
Unfortunately I was not able to read it as the format for kindle was something more like a photo file - in tiny print and not able to be enlarged. Kindle purchasers beware of this. I was most disappointed as I had been looking forward to trhis book tremendously. Should have returned - but didn't.
melody of you melody of you
John Cowper Powys is one of those authors who can be recognized just by the distinction of his prose, employing a style characterized by a picturesque metaphorical lyricism and, particularly in "Wolf Solent," the title character's deep introspection regarding his relationship to the world. Terms like "first cause" and "magnetic" are repeated throughout the novel like motifs, revealing the author's preoccupation with metaphysical forces, motivations, and effects.
Wolf is a 35-year-old man who, at the beginning of the novel, is moving from London to his native county of Dorsetshire to take a job assisting a wealthy man named Urquhart, the Squire of King's Barton, in writing a book about the more scandalous aspects of the histories of local families. Wolf finds Urquhart to be rather eccentric and petty and soon learns that his previous assistant, a young man named Redfern, died under disputable circumstances. This sounds like a setup for an intriguing mystery, especially when Wolf discovers Urquhart's gardener and another man digging around Redfern's grave one night, but the novel is concerned more with the essence of secrecy than with the mechanics of revealing secrets.
The residents of Dorsetshire, with their piquant personalities, rustic sincerity, and realistic complexity, are worthy of a Thomas Hardy novel; no set of characters can expect higher praise than that. They are there not just to drive the plot forward but to act and react against Wolf and each other to create a theater of emotions and passions in which life becomes a colorful, unpredictable masquerade. The principal players include Jason Otter, a morose, temperamental poet; Selena Gault, an ugly old spinster with whom Wolf's father had had an affair; Tilly-Valley, a foolish vicar; and Bob Weevil, a lascivious butcher whose sausages possibly connote something priapic about his role in the community.
Wolf's research brings him to two young ladies with whom he falls in love: Gerda Torp, the stonecutter's daughter, whose stunning beauty and nymphlike nature arouse his sexual desires; and Christie Malakite, the bookseller's daughter, a relatively plain but bright girl who is harboring a vile secret about her father and to whom Wolf relates on an intellectual level. As Wolf's romantic reveries careen between the two women representing two different erotic ideals, body and mind, we see an intense internal conflict building within him, one that threatens to, but somehow never does, unravel his inner peace.
And what is the source of this peace? Simply that Wolf has escaped the modernity and materialism of London to embrace the idyllic antiquity of rural England and to experience "certain sensations" -- not that he knows exactly what these are yet, but perhaps the fun is in not knowing, in exploration and self-discovery. This is also why he is annoyed by the encroachment of automobiles and airplanes into Dorsetshire towards the end of the novel -- twentieth-century technology has no place in the world whose nineteenth-century tranquility he wants dearly to preserve.