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eBook Long View (Perennial Library) ePub

eBook Long View (Perennial Library) ePub

by Elizabeth Jane Howard

  • ISBN: 0060806273
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Elizabeth Jane Howard
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: HarperCollins (October 1, 1982)
  • Pages: 368
  • ePub book: 1105 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1870 kb
  • Other: rtf mobi lrf lit
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 527

Description

Items related to Long View (Perennial Library). Elizabeth Jane Howard Long View (Perennial Library).

Items related to Long View (Perennial Library). ISBN 13: 9780060806279. Long View (Perennial Library). Elizabeth Jane Howard.

by Howard, Elizabeth Jane. by Howard, Elizabeth Jane.

Elizabeth Jane Howard’s exquisite and understated novels have been overshadowed by her turbulent private life. But is the real reason why they are underestimated because they are books ‘about women, by a woman’? Published: 30 Jan 2016. Elizabeth Jane Howard: Hilary Mantel on the novelist she tells everyone to read. Rereading Kingsley Amis: 45 ways of being annoying.

The Long View book (The author, Elizabeth Jane Howard, rose to international stardom with he. .

The Long View', a revealing portrait of a marriage, is the ingenious construction of a couple's story that offers a remarkable and very real view of the shifting relationship between two people from 1950 to 1926. The author, Elizabeth Jane Howard, rose to international stardom with her magnificent Cazalet family saga. Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Alibris Indigo Better World Books IndieBound.

The Long View by.

Elizabeth Jane Howard. The complete multigenerational saga of an upper-middle-class British family before, during, and after World War II. As war clouds gather on England's horizon, the Cazalet siblings, along with their wives, children, and servants, prepare to leave London and join their parents at their Sussex estate, Home Place. The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Originally published in 1956, The Long View is Elizabeth Jane Howard's uncannily authentic portrait of one marriage and one woman

Originally published in 1956, The Long View is Elizabeth Jane Howard's uncannily authentic portrait of one marriage and one woman. One of his secret pleasures was the loading of social dice against himself.

Elizabeth Jane Howard's career as a novelist has been long and distinguished. Her autobiography is due to be published in 2002. The Long View" is one of her early novels, dating from 1956. The author adopts an unusual construction for her narrative. It might be called chronology in reverse. Instead of tracing the development of a relationship between husband and wife over a period of twenty-four years, Miss Howard begins in the present and reverts, stage by stage, to the time of the first meeting.

by Elizabeth Jane Howard. The Long View - Elizabeth Jane Howard. In illuminating the quotidian details of domestic life, The Long View perfectly captures a long relationship, with its moments of joy and intimacy, loneliness and regret, and of the roads not taken. As the story moves backward in time, we learn about the events that led up to Conrad and Antonia’s fateful first meeting-including a startling secret in Antonia’s past.

Elizabeth Jane Howard, CBE, FRSL (26 March 1923 – 2 January 2014), was an English novelist, author of 12 novels including the best-selling series The Cazalet Chronicles

Elizabeth Jane Howard, CBE, FRSL (26 March 1923 – 2 January 2014), was an English novelist, author of 12 novels including the best-selling series The Cazalet Chronicles. Howard worked briefly as an actress in provincial repertory and occasionally as a model before her writing career, which began in 1947

Traces the course of the relationship of Antonia and Conrad Fleming, backwards, from the break up of their marriage to their first meeting

Comments

Golden Lama Golden Lama
To me this is one of the best novels of the mid twentieth century and I have no idea why it is not now in print. The plot is an intricate, absorbing story of the beginning and long dissolution of a marriage. The characters haunt you because their story never quite resolves. The structure of starting 'in the present' and moving back in time creates its own suspense, as each 'older' episode illuminates the characters and their situations, and increases the sense of sorrow. But although things become clearer, they never become clear. The husband is an impossible man, Conrad Fleming, who is initially repellent, then devilishly manipulative, then sympathetic, then a mystery, but he is a strong and compelling character. He is one of the fine sadists that are stock in English literature, often written by a woman. To mystify, evade, patronize and shape their chosen partner is their sex play. The central character, Conrad's wife, Antonia. is equally mysterious, a strong woman and yet a masochist. This book touches on solitude, and most on how other people stay unknowable, even in 'the long view'.
Dominator Dominator
Eloquent account of a very young woman who runs from a damaging family and first affair to a husband who wishes to form her. This 1954 novel is beautifully written as is everything by EJ Howard.
Gosar Gosar
I loved all EJH books except this one - Didn't finish and threw it away!
Ance Ance
From the start where we're told of a wife 'sinking to the occasion' of organising a house party, where people would consume 'glazed dazed little pieces of food', we realise that this is not going to be a story about a story but about the author's writing style. We meet several extremely boring, snobby and self obsessed people in a 1950's London suburb. A wife who knows that she is passed over for a succession of mistresses and flings elicits no sympathy for having no backbone. A younger man in Edwardian fashion later announces to her that her daughter, his latest fling, or one of them, is pregnant and he doesn't wish to marry her.

Finding a character's point of view is made more difficult because the author keeps inserting her own external view, as when a character is reminded that she should 'take tea (that horrible unnecessary meal designed to make unsatisfied women more unsatisfactory) with' another woman.
This tale is like a gossip columnist of the day sneering at all the pillars of society. Phrases like 'ghastly sterility' abound.

Then we go back to 1942, when gas masks are a fact of life, and I found this more interesting with descriptive passages telling us of the smell of wartime Euston Station in the dark. The same characters are having a tough time of it but are still self centred and we wonder how their struggle for normality at this time has led to the rigid boredom we saw in the 1950 account. In both time periods everyone drinks astonishing amounts while wives pander to their husbands' whims to the degree of not saying anything they might not like to hear.

Then we return still further, to the 1930s. People still dress for dinner and don't understand one another. Alcohol still lubricates society. A woman stares into her empty glass as she decides that she could never be an artist, the glass symbolising an empty dream. She is told 'anyway, you'll marry and have children', although there were some actual careers open to women at this time. The last part of the story occurs in 1926.

We do not meet anyone who is not middle class, as far as I can tell, though there is vague mention of a splendid housekeeper from time to time or an unhelpful porter at the station. If you think this slow story of a backwards look at a marriage which is destined to fail, but which may never have been very much in the first place, will interest you, be my guest. It's like a Lord Peter Wimsey tale without anything so interesting as a murder. The author was born in 1923 and has just put her memories on paper in her own way. I'm sorry that the characters didn't seem to lead a very lively or useful life.

I downloaded a copy from Net Galley for an unbiased review.
Hucama Hucama
This book has layer upon layer of emotion, reams of emotion! Sometimes too much, given how bleak things often are, but it is very well done and interesting despite its off-putting view of marriage. The fact that it is told in reverse helps me understand how the relationships became that way, but also means that I know it inevitably gets worse in the future (since I've read that part already).

I received a free electronic copy from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review.
Fararala Fararala
This book had an interesting narrative style & a unique chronological order but I struggled with it because it was extremely wordy. I felt like the story got lost in all the details.

Advanced Reader Copy provided by the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.
SadLendy SadLendy
Elizabeth Jane Howard's career as a novelist has been long and distinguished. Her autobiography is due to be published in 2002. "The Long View" is one of her early novels, dating from 1956.
The author adopts an unusual construction for her narrative. It might be called chronology in reverse. Instead of tracing the development of a relationship between husband and wife over a period of twenty-four years, Miss Howard begins in the present and reverts, stage by stage, to the time of the first meeting.
No novelist known to me is as skilled as Miss Howard at dissecting and displaying the myriad flickerings and quiverings of people's thought and emotions in dialogue with themselves and in interaction with each other. Admiration of this skill is more likely to command your attention in this book than are the appeals of suspense, plot development and setting.