cdc-coteauxdegaronne
» » The Rise of David Levinsky
eBook The Rise of David Levinsky ePub

eBook The Rise of David Levinsky ePub

by Abraham Cahan

  • ISBN: 0554048515
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Abraham Cahan
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: BiblioBazaar (March 14, 2007)
  • Pages: 586
  • ePub book: 1658 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1857 kb
  • Other: azw lit docx doc
  • Rating: 4.4
  • Votes: 589

Description

The Rise of David Levinsky is a novel by Abraham Cahan. It was published in 1917, and remains Cahan's best known work.

The Rise of David Levinsky is a novel by Abraham Cahan. The book is told in the form of a fictional autobiography of David Levinsky, a Russian Jew who emigrates to America and rises from rags to riches. The main character, David Levinsky, is born in 1865 in Antomir, a city of 80,000 in the Kovno district of the Russian Empire (present-day Lithuania). His father dies when he is three, leaving him and his mother to fend for themselves

First published in 1917, Abraham Cahan's realistic novel tells the story of a young talmudic scholar who emigrates from a small town in Russia to the melting pot of turn-of-the-century New York City.

First published in 1917, Abraham Cahan's realistic novel tells the story of a young talmudic scholar who emigrates from a small town in Russia to the melting pot of turn-of-the-century New York City. As the Jewish "greenhorn" rises from the depths of poverty to become a millionaire garment merchant, he discovers the unbearably high price of assimilation.

LibriVox recording of The Rise of David Levinsky by Abraham Cahan. Read in English by volunteer readers. 24 - Book VIII - The Destruction of My Temple Book, Chapters 5,6 download. 25 - Book IX - Dora, Chapter 1 download. 26 - Book IX - Dora, Chapter 2 download. 27 - Book IX - Dora, Chapters 3,4 download.

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1917). Book I - Home and School. The Talmud is a voluminous work of about twenty ponderous tomes

New York: Harper & Brothers, 1917). The Talmud is a voluminous work of about twenty ponderous tomes. If it be true that our people represent a high percentage of mental vigor, the distinction is probably due, in some measure, to the extremely important part which Talmud studies have played in the spiritual life of the race.

Abraham Cahan's book tells the story of David Levinski, a young Russian Jewish who emigrated to America after . The collected stories were published in book form in 1917.

Abraham Cahan's book tells the story of David Levinski, a young Russian Jewish who emigrated to America after the death of his mother. In Russia he is a Talmud scholar, his life is his studies. Arriving in NYC he works on assimilating into a new country, a new way of life, whole still holding onto his religious beliefs. David Levinsky, who is orphaned when his mother is killed by anti-Semitic peasants in his hometown in Russia, makes his way to America. This book is his story, the tale of a man who by hook and crook, makes his way in the world, alone.

Born in Lithuania, Abraham Cahan rose to literary acclaim in America as both a journalist and a writer of fiction

Born in Lithuania, Abraham Cahan rose to literary acclaim in America as both a journalist and a writer of fiction.

Электронная книга "The Rise of David Levinsky", Abraham Cahan

Электронная книга "The Rise of David Levinsky", Abraham Cahan. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Rise of David Levinsky" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Book I Home and School Book II Enter Satan Book III I Lose My Mother Book IV Matilda Book V I Discover America Book VI A Greenhorn No Longer Book VII My Temple Book VIII The Destruction of My Temple Book IX Dora Book X On the Road Book XI Matrimony Book XII Miss Tevkin Book.

Book I Home and School Book II Enter Satan Book III I Lose My Mother Book IV Matilda Book V I Discover America Book VI A Greenhorn No Longer Book VII My Temple Book VIII The Destruction of My Temple Book IX Dora Book X On the Road Book XI Matrimony Book XII Miss Tevkin Book XIII At Her Father's House Book. XIV Episodes of a Lonely Life. Book I. Home and school. Chapter I. SOMETIMES, when I think of my past in a superficial, casual way, the metamorphosis I have gone through strikes me as nothing short of a miracle.

Levinsky falls as he rises, and rises as he falls, and perhaps there is something almost universally true about .

Levinsky falls as he rises, and rises as he falls, and perhaps there is something almost universally true about the human predicament of success. This book could just as easily have been called "The Fall of David Levinsky", with its descriptions of a boy who goes from being the king of the cheder in his shtetl, to becomi I read this one a long time ago and was really drawn in by the pathos and the humor, and, of course, the journey. Cahan refuses to make this a simple story about good and evil

Sometimes- when I think of my past in a superficial casual way the metamorphosis I have gone through strikes me as nothing short of a miracle.' (Excerpt from Chapter 1)

Comments

Shadowbourne Shadowbourne
A beautiful book.

Abraham Cahan's book tells the story of David Levinski, a young Russian Jewish who emigrated to America after the death of his mother. In Russia he is a Talmud scholar, his life is his studies.

Arriving in NYC he works on assimilating into a new country, a new way of life, whole still holding onto his religious beliefs. As the book progresses we see him become more American, less Jewish, trapped between the two. He becomes a successful businessman, goes from poverty to great wealth, but loses so much in the bargain.

The book shows how we can regret what we left and not be happy with what we have. How the loss of a cultural identity can outweigh the identity we assume.

It also describes life in NYC during the late 1800s, life of immigrants on the Lower East Side and what they went through.

A great book, written in 1917 it is real because Cahan lived during the times he describes.
GEL GEL
The Rise of David Levinsky is a classic description of a Jewish immigrant in the late 19th century provided by an expert writer and editor who lived among the millions of immigrants who populated the Lower East Side of New York between 1880 and 1940, the period covered by the book. The author, Abraham Cahan, was the long-time editor of the Jewish Forward. The fictional character he invents, begins life as an orphaned Litvak Talmudic scholar. He is good looking and bright, but unlucky. He comes to New York with no money, skills, or family and consequently is battered around a bit before finding a path to success in business, although he soon learns that even this path is not lacking in challenges. The story permits Cahan to describe dozens of typical behaviors, relationships, and conditions characteristic of the period but, thanks to the quality of the writing, it has withstood the test of time and is still an excellent read.
Djang Djang
Because my heart is aching for David Levinsky my eyes are overflowing. As a little boy whose dirt poor mother in Entnomir Russia did so much so that he could be an Cheder or Talmud boy was in itself so compelling. Than everything that follows, her killing by local Jew haters, his loneliness, his encounter with wealthy bitch Jewess Mathilda, his going so young so broke and all by himself to America, his no love in return but successful business carrier at the expense of college and union work and let's not forget the constant tension between socialism and captitalism. All felt so real, I could feel it all. I wish I had read that book early in life. It makes me realize what it meant to be an immigrant and what they went through although my own parents, mother having lost her parents in Auschwitz, went through quite some of it and I being raised in Belgium but having moved to America later in life too.
Ishnsius Ishnsius
That basically summarizes this book. Success, in the eyes of the world, can result in personal tragedy.

The author, Ab. Cahan, was a fervent socialist and ardent trade-unionist. He wrote this novel in English for a major American magazine, McClure's. At the same time he was the editor of the world's largest Yiddish newspaper, The Jewish Daily Forward. The collected stories were published in book form in 1917.

David Levinsky, who is orphaned when his mother is killed by anti-Semitic peasants in his hometown in Russia, makes his way to America. This book is his story, the tale of a man who by hook and crook, makes his way in the world, alone.

He learns English, he becomes an American and he also becomes a very wealthy businessman, a factory-owner and big shot. However, he cannot shake his loneliness and desire for a wife and family.

Actually, what he really needed was a good psychotherapist but, unfortunately, he was at least thirty years too early for that.

I found the book fascinating with its vivid descriptions of life among the Eastern European Jewish New York immigrant population. It reminded me of the work of Horatio Alger, the great American juvenile author who described the trip from rags to riches.

Unlike Alger's heroes, however, David Levinsky is hopelessly neurotic.

He finds the opportunity for misery in the most fruitful situations. This is a man who, while being a talented businessman, really screws up interpersonal relationships, especially with women to whom he is attracted.

If you read the book, which I do recommend, get the Penguin paperback edition as another reviewer suggests. You will be glad that you did. I got mine used since it doesn't seem to be offered new at this time.

Enjoy.
Milleynti Milleynti
I first read this book in the mid-70s when it was assigned as part of an undergrad history course. I devoured it then, rediscovered it ten years later and found I enjoyed it even more on a second reading. Subsequent readings have not diminished my admiration for the novel.
"Levinsky" is a rare example of the novel that works both as history and as literature. Cahan's firsthand observations of late 19th century industrial America and of the immigrants' struggles to adapt to life in a new land are compelling in their own right. But this is no mere slice of life realism. Cahan created complex characters who face conflicts beyond the struggle to survive.
Cahan's main character, Levinsky, spends the first part of the book struggling to master the Talmud in his village in Russia. Here Cahan introduces us to Levinsky's incisive mind, one that will serve him well when he goes to America and begins to serve a new master: business. In the opening section, Cahan also develops one of several beautifully drawn supporting characters: Levinsky's mother.
By novel's end, we realize the irony of the novel's title. On one level, Levinsky's story is a classic tale of rags-to-riches, American-style success. On the other, his story is one of failure to achieve the rich, personal, intellectually stimulating connection with others that he has craved since childhood.
This great novel deserves to be on the short list of indispensable American fiction. One seeking to understand the roots of our country would be hard pressed to do better than to read it.