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eBook The Seven Who Fled ePub

eBook The Seven Who Fled ePub

by Frederic Prokosch

  • ISBN: 0374261288
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Frederic Prokosch
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux (April 1, 1984)
  • Pages: 479
  • ePub book: 1582 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1812 kb
  • Other: lrf lrf doc mbr
  • Rating: 4.5
  • Votes: 736

Description

Prokosch's novels The Asiatics and The Seven Who Fled received widespread attention in the 1930s.

Prokosch's novels The Asiatics and The Seven Who Fled received widespread attention in the 1930s. The action in both of these narratives takes place in Asia, a continent Prokosch had not visited but wrote about from his imagination and from books and maps. Landscape descriptions are so prevalent that the landscape often takes on the role of a character in its own right.

It's a novel about seven people fleeing a Chinese warlord across the Gobi desert. And there is one section near the beginning, in a chapter called "Layeville," who is one of the characters, where he describes the desert. And it is the most mesmerizing writing I have ever read. And there is a flow to it, because Prokosch was also a poet.

The Seven Who Fled book. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. by. Frederic Prokosch.

The Seven Who Fled is Prokosch's second novel, a follow-up to The Asiatics, whose debut had brought him considerable critical praise. Both novels are set in Asia, a continent Prokosch knew at that time only from maps and National Geographic surveys. Whereas The Asiatics follows one young American from Beirut to Hong Kong, The Seven Who Fled follows (naturally) seven characters with different backgrounds who start out together but are scattered by political upheaval and try to escape from central Asia.

by. Prokosch, Frederic, 1908-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Prokosch created a small tempest in a teapot with his The Asiatics. This is a less excitingly novel book than that, but once again he gives free rein to a lurid imagination and an absorption in the Far East

Prokosch created a small tempest in a teapot with his The Asiatics. This is a less excitingly novel book than that, but once again he gives free rein to a lurid imagination and an absorption in the Far East. He takes a group arbitrarily thrown together and as arbitrarily thrust forth onto their own and others' paths

Frederic Prokosch (May 17, 1906 - June 2, 1989) was an American poet and prose writer, known for his novels . Albert Camus said about The Seven Who Fled, "Prokosch has invented what might be called the geographical novel, in which he mingles sensuality with irony, lucidity with mystery.

Frederic Prokosch (May 17, 1906 - June 2, 1989) was an American poet and prose writer, known for his novels, poetry, memoirs and criticism. He was also a distinguished translator. Prokosch was born in Madison, Wisconsin, into an intellectual family that travelled widely. He conveys a fatalistic sense of life half hidden beneath a rich animal energy. He is a master of moods and undertones, a virtuoso in the feeling of place, and he writes in a style of supple elegance.

Frederic Prokosch was a writer of poetry, novels, criticism, and memoirs . He also was an accomplished racquetball player, a lepidopterist, and was involved twice in forgery for profit. Image: Frederic Prokosch, 1937, Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, Digital ID: cph 3c24444. Prokosch’s novels The Asiatics and The Seven Who Fled were very popular in the 1930s, mainly due to Prokosch’s sensuous depiction of landscape and its rich interaction with human events.

Prokosch's novels The Asiatics and The Seven Who Fled received widespread .

A book about the European mentalities against the background of snow and ice in the deserts of Sinkiang.

Comments

Arlana Arlana
Following his smash success with "The Asiatics" his second book,"The Seven Who Fled," was almost
as successful but, basically, it was an extension of "The Asiatics," broke no new ground and foreshadowed
his future writing; trying to recapture the magic of his first book.

And, once again, reading Greenfield's "Dreamer's Journey" is the only explanation of this tremendously talented
and mysterious personality.
Kardana Kardana
I received this book in a Red Cross package while serving in Viet Nam in 1967. I still have the same edition and it one of my favorite books, one of my treasured possessions, and one I have read several times. Other reviewers have summarized the plot of this novel so there is no need to repeat. But what I do wish to add is my own feeling of awe , as I am transported like no other novel I have read, by his descriptions of scenery, of place, of mood , as his characters travel a cross a surreal landscape. I was shocked to learn, years after my first reading, that his descriptions of the places in the novel were born of his imagination. Truly a gifted, and sadly, a forgotten writer.
Iarim Iarim
In a recent interview, the amazing writer Harlan Ellison says this, and his word is good enough for me:

"My favorite book in the world is The Seven Who Fled, by Frederic Prokosch. You can get one off Amazon in any number of editions.

"It's a novel about seven people fleeing a Chinese warlord across the Gobi desert.

"And there is one section near the beginning, in a chapter called "Layeville," who is one of the characters, where he describes the desert.

"And it is the most mesmerizing writing I have ever read. And there is a flow to it, because Prokosch was also a poet. And this was the Harper Prize novel, I think in 1933, or '34, something like that.

"And it was not his first novel--his first novel was The Asiatics--but it was his second. And for someone that young to write that brilliantly sets a mountaintop for people such as I to aspire to.

"And you cannot--I will take that book with me when I do writers' workshops, and I will read them just that one section. It's not much, it's about a page.

"And I say, "When you can write like that, then I will bow down and I will kiss the hem of your garment." So."
terostr terostr
Frederic Prokosch is the author I would most wish to save from what Gore Vidal has called "time's winged wastebasket." Born in 1908, his career extended from the early 1930's to the 1980's. He combines an extraordinary talent for description and a lush romantic prose style that never crosses the line into being purple with a modern -- nearly existential -- sensibility. One might think the two would conflict, but remarkably they don't. Prokosch invests scenes of near-total bleakness with stunning beauty, and describes scenes of the most intense beauty with a sometimes disturbing detachment. His gift for language surpasses any American of his era except Fitzgerald (and they are neck and neck), but the quality of his thought is clearer. Fitzgerald learned his style from Keats, but Prokosch seems by temperament much more capable of the negative capability Keats extolled. The influence of Prokosch, who was perhaps more widely read in Europe than in the U.S. (his home country), can be found in magical realism (Garcia-Marquez, Bowles) and in the current generation of European authors (Rushdie, Kundera, etc.).

_The Seven Who Fled_ is Prokosch's second novel, a follow-up to _The Asiatics_, whose debut had brought him considerable critical praise. Both novels are set in Asia, a continent Prokosch knew at that time only from maps and National Geographic surveys. Whereas _The Asiatics_ follows one young American from Beirut to Hong Kong, _The Seven Who Fled_ follows (naturally) seven characters with different backgrounds who start out together but are scattered by political upheaval and try to escape from central Asia. Following seven characters allows Prokosch to more fully explore the human condition -- the different ways people react to the unfamiliar and to danger, the different fates that result either from their decisions or simple bad luck -- than he could with one, though of course he sacrifices some dramatic unity in the process.

The seven characters are of different nationalities, genders, belief systems, etc. But rather than -- as with many books of that era and ours -- the characters becoming representative types, a thinly disguised way for the author to generalize about their respective categories, what comes through is a broader sense of the inadequacy of any one narrow viewpoint. We may like or dislike certain of the characters, but they hold our interest because of their common humanity -- and, at times, their inhumanity.

I have no desire to spoil the outcome of the novel for any who can find it, since it is currently out of print. But I would hold up certain scenes for comparison with any written in the 20th century. For example, one of the characters freezes to death, and the chapter which his progress slows and stops and his mind drifts to the home he will never see again is masterly, indeed quite superior to any similar scene written by Jack London.

Prokosch would turn to the far east again in his fiction -- _The Dark Dancer_, set in medieval India, is quite good -- but these first two novels are arguably his best until _The Missolonghi Manuscript_, a faux-memoir of Byron's last days in Greece. Perhaps it is the stoic aspects of eastern philosophy and religion that drew him, for the sensibility in his novels is very nearly Buddhist in its overall detachment while remaining Romantic in its particulars. Whatever it was, the world he has imagined will likely strike you so powerfully that you will choose to return more than once.