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eBook The Italian Woman ePub

eBook The Italian Woman ePub

by Jean Plaidy

  • ISBN: 0099493187
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Jean Plaidy
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Arrow; New Ed edition (July 1, 2006)
  • Pages: 400
  • ePub book: 1467 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1150 kb
  • Other: docx lrf lrf docx
  • Rating: 4.3
  • Votes: 381

Description

Jean Plaidy, one of the pre-eminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century, is the pen name of the prolific . Jean Plaidy’s novels had sold more than 14 million copies worldwide by the time of her death in 1993.

Jean Plaidy, one of the pre-eminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century, is the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, also known as Victoria Holt. For further information about Arrow’s Jean Plaidy reissues and mailing list, please visit. Praise for Jean Plaidy. Plaidy excels at blending history with romance and drama’.

Jean Plaidy, the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, was one of the preeminent authors of historical . Madame Serpent covered a very dramatic beginning to the life of Catherine Medici

Jean Plaidy, the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, was one of the preeminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century. Madame Serpent covered a very dramatic beginning to the life of Catherine Medici. Jean Plaidy brought to life a cast of complex, exciting men and women who dominated the Renaissance and told their story as if it were fiction, although reality was almost stranger than fiction. Italian Woman is not quite so layered, but it is still an excellent read.

The Italian Woman book. Fun reading by Jean Plaidy and it balanced out the other Catherine Medici book I read last year (The Confessions of Catherine de Medici by . That book had a lot of compassion for Catherine and turned her adversary, Jeanne of Nevarre, into quite an antagonist that was easy to hate. In this book, I felt just the reverse. Plaidy seems to side with Jeanne and turns Catherine into a cold calculating temptress. It does not surprise me that this book was written in the 70s.

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by. Plaidy, Jean, 1906-1993. Catherine de Médicis, Queen, consort of Henry II, King of France, 1519-1589, Queens, Catherine de Médicis, Queen, consort of Henry II, King of France, 1519-1589 - Fiction, Queens - France - Fiction, France. New York : Touchstone. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by ttscribe1. hongkong on April 2, 2018. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Hibbert's last Jean Plaidy book The Rose Without a Thorn was published posthumously . Madame Serpent (1951). The Italian Woman (1952) (. Queen Jezebel (1953). Hibbert also wrote four non-fiction books under the pseudonym Jean Plaidy. Gerald G Swan published the first Jean Plaidy book in 1945 but every one after that was published by Robert Hale  . The Mary Stuart, Queen of Scots Series.

A Catherine de' Medici Novel. From the grande dame of historical fiction, the second novel in the classic trilogy-back in print after more than twenty years-brilliantly depicts the life of the powerful Queen who was loved by few and feared by many. The second book in the classic Catherine de’ Medici trilogy from Jean Plaidy, the grande dame of historical fiction. When Catherine de’ Medici was forced to marry Henry, Duke of Orleans, her heart was not the only one that was broken.

Jean Plaidy, the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, was one of the preeminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Jean Plaidy, the pen name of the prolific English author Eleanor Hibbert, was one of the preeminent authors of historical fiction for most of the twentieth century.

When Catherine de' Medici was forced to marry Henry of Orleans, her's was not the only heart broken. Jeanne of Navarre once dreamed of marrying this same prince, but like Catherine, she must bend to the will of King Francis's political needs. And so both Catherine and Jeanne's lives are set on unwanted paths, destined to cross in affairs of state, love and faith, driving them to become deadly political rivals. Years later, Jeanne is happily married to the dashing but politically inept Antoine de Bourbon, whilst the widowed Catherine continues to be loved by few and feared by many - including her children. But she is now the powerful mother of kings, who will do anything to see her beloved second son, Henry, rule France. As civil war ravages the country and Jeanne fights for the Huguenot cause, Catherine advances along her unholy road, making enemies at every turn...

Comments

Eayaroler Eayaroler
What a women!! I know poetic licence has been taken but it hard to credit historical truth in so much of this story. But as Jean Plaidy acknowledges she did research so some must be true. I am so glad I did not live in the French Court during this era.
Malien Malien
This is the first book of the trilogy. Star-crossed lovers seperated, the Pope had children in the 1500's, all kinds of interesting things going on. It will keep you going to the very end and on to the next book The Madame Serpent and then Queen Jezebel!
Vudogal Vudogal
This is another interesting story told by Jean Plaidy about Catherine De Medici. As always Ms Plaidy delivers on a story well told and thought out. It is almost like she was actually there.
Catherine De Medici is an enigmatic character in history who is understood by very few.

I have alway wonder what was her relationship like with Mary Stuart among other historical figures in her life.
I highly recommend this read.
Mr_TrOlOlO Mr_TrOlOlO
The Italian Woman
The Italian Woman, by Jean Plaidy.

This book is the second of Plaidy's trio of books about Catherine de Medici. It also works as a stand-alone work, however.

In general, I thoroughly enjoy Jean Plaidy's books, so I was a little surprised that this one didn't really capture me and pull me in. In the first place, I found it highly annoying that the first part of the book focused nearly exclusively on someone whose relationship to Catherine de Medici went completely unmentioned. It was quite some time before I figured out who the woman was and why she might be important in a story about Catherine de Medici. Also, I found this book a bit tedious after a while -- the scheming of the two factions became repetitive, and there was simply not enough variety to keep my imagination fully engaged.

On the other hand, for someone who is familiar with the Catherine de Medici story and that period of French history, this is a nice addition to other versions of Catherine's life. There is nothing particularly objectionable about the writing, but at the same time the story is a little lacking in energy and momentum.

Over all, not a bad read, but not a real page-turner either. 3 out of 5.
Androlhala Androlhala
This is the second book in Plaidy's trilogy about Catherine Medici. In it, Medici's love and ambitions for her children as well as her quest for revenge against those who had humiliated her for so long forms the skeleton of the story. Her husband is dead and Catherine is Queen Regent. Her son Francis, now King of France and husband of Mary Queen of Scots, is sickly. Catherine yearns for her second son, Henry, to gain the throne.
Passion, intrigue and murder -- what else would one expect from the infamous Borgias of Rome? Plaidy's style is entertaining and literate. She weaves history into stories with intricate plots. Characters who were once real people strut upon the literary stage expressing their feelings and frustrations, loves and hates. The reader experiences sights and sounds of a world long past, with voices of people who may or may not have spoken as Plaidy reports.
It really doesn't matter how much is fiction and how much is fact. The book is fine, mesmerizing reading.
Sunnye Tiedemann (aka Ruth F. Tiedemann)
digytal soul digytal soul
I know Jean Plaidy is considered a doyenne of historical fiction, thanks to her immaculate research and attention to detail. And I hate when a historical novel gets the facts wrong. But historical accuracy alone does not a gripping novel make. I felt that Plaidy forgot the cardinal rule of good writing: Show, don't tell. Instead we got lots and lots of telling--in sometimes clunky syntax to boot. The end result was that I felt I'd learned a lot about Catherine de Medici, her children and her court, but my senses and emotions were never involved.
Bort Bort
A superb novel, one of my favourite book I have ever read. Jean Plaidy is able to convert history into an interesting book which people can get absorbed in without a problem. Its an easy book to read with treachery, murder and romance. It has a wide range of vocabulary and I have learnt many new words from reading this book. I recommmend this book for anyone over 14 years old.