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eBook A Richer Dust ePub

eBook A Richer Dust ePub

by Amy Boaz

  • ISBN: 1579621597
  • Category: Womens Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Amy Boaz
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: The Permanent Press (March 1, 2008)
  • Pages: 184
  • ePub book: 1354 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1796 kb
  • Other: mbr lit lrf rtf
  • Rating: 4.6
  • Votes: 690

Description

During the 1920s, the American West held boundless possibilities for freedom of expression, and thus became a mecca for artists and writers.

During the 1920s, the American West held boundless possibilities for freedom of expression, and thus became a mecca for artists and writers. Debut novelist Boaz, a native of New Mexico, offers a story.

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When Doll, a British painter just out of art school at Slade, arrives. See a Problem? We’d love your help. Details (if other): Cancel.

by. Boaz, Amy, 1961-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by MerciG on December 4, 2010. Women painters, Philosophers, Artists, British. Sag Harbor, NY : Permanent Press. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

When Doll, a British painter just out of art school at Slade, arrives in New Mexico in 1924, she is certain only of her faith in the man who invited her: social philosopher Abe Bronstone, who has left Britain to found a model society in Taos.

A Richer Dust is an enticing debut novel by Amy Boaz. Set in the backdrops of World War 1, the narrative focuses on an iconoclastic woman, Doll, who migrates with a social philosopher and her wife for a fresh new life. The plot changes dramatically as she gets involved in a physical affair with a younger geek.

Lawrence’s 1924 pilgrimage to Taos, . where he hoped to create an artists’ utopia, Amy Boaz’s diamond-cut debut, A Richer Dust, follows Doll, a shy, near-deaf painter who accompanies brooding philosopher Abe Bronstone and his querulous German wife, Vera, from London to Taos. Boaz moves with brisk authority between three time periods: Doll’s aristocratic upbringing in pre-WWI London, her ill-fated, impulsive voyage with Abe and Vera, and her spirited dotage, where she finds love with an eccentric younger man.

Very well written book of short stories. I highly recommend this book, you won't be disappointed,rather you will be looking for more books by Amy, who is one great writer!

She earned her MFA in Fiction from the New School and teaches creative writing workshops to adolescents and teens at Writopia Lab. Dust is her first book. Very well written book of short stories.

When Doll, a British painter just out of art school at Slade, arrives in New Mexico in 1924, she is certain only of her faith in the man who invited her: social philosopher Abe Bronstone, who has left Britain to found a model society in Taos. Doll has renounced her own aristocratic roots to join the high desert household of Abe and his wife Vera (a scandalous German divorcée). Doll's narration of events moves backward to her childhood in Victorian London, and forward to her solitary life in 1963 Taos, solitary until she meets the much younger Akbar ("He doesn't know how much younger and I don't plan to tell him"). As the community around Abe which loosely incorporates East Coast heiress Janie; her Native American husband, Junior; local Indians from the reservation; and a war-traumatized Chicago poet and his wife unravels, Doll's affair with Akbar, the most fulfilling of her life, intensifies, but it puts her in small-town conflict with Akbar's mother, protective of her sweetly ne'er-do-well son.Inspired by events in the life of the British painter Dorothy Brett, who ventured to Taos with D.H. Lawrence and his wife in the years after World War I (and, unlike the Lawrences, stayed to brave it out), A Richer Dust finds in Doll's life the convulsive shift from the Victorian to the Modern, as aesthetics and sexuality found explosive new forms. It is the story of a woman who remains open to life despite discouragement and disappointments, and whose self-discovery of her art, her body, and her mind is as unceasing as it is unaffected. The Taos landscape, through Doll's eyes (and through the rest of her keen senses, except for her damaged hearing), is vivid and breathtaking, and serves as a magnificent canvas for sketching the arc of her life.