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eBook Way of All Flesh ePub

eBook Way of All Flesh ePub

by Samuel Butler

  • ISBN: 0460018957
  • Category: Womens Fiction
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Samuel Butler
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: E P Dutton; New impression edition (June 1973)
  • ePub book: 1556 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1884 kb
  • Other: rtf docx mbr txt
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 349

Description

The Way of All Flesh (sometimes called Ernest Pontifex, or the Way of All Flesh) is a l novel by Samuel Butler that attacks Victorian-era hypocrisy.

The Way of All Flesh (sometimes called Ernest Pontifex, or the Way of All Flesh) is a l novel by Samuel Butler that attacks Victorian-era hypocrisy. Written between 1873 and 1884, it traces four generations of the Pontifex family. Butler dared not publish it during his lifetime, but when it was published (in 1903) it was accepted as part of the general reaction against Victorianism.

This book has religious questioning throughout which is the driving force of this novel but not in an overly religious way but more of a young man wondering about God and religion in his life and what path to follow. Butler’s wit is found throughout The Way of All Flesh and helped the reader go along with him as the main character, Ernest Pontifex comes of age in a repressed English household in the mid-1800′s.

Samuel Butler (1835-1902) was an author, literary critic, philosopher, painter and translator of Homer. After a disagreement about his career with his father, a clergyman who had been pressured into joining the Church by his own father, Butler left England to become a sheep farmer in New Zealand. The letters he wrote to his father from here formed the basis of his utopian satire Erewhon. The Way of All Flesh, a l exploration of Victorian family life and indictment of Victorian hypocrisy, was published posthumously in 1903.

Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required. The Way of All Flesh Hardcover – 1928. by. Samuel Butler (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central.

Butler dared not publish it during his lifetime, but when it was published, it was accepted as part of the general revulsion against . One fee. Stacks of books.

Butler dared not publish it during his lifetime, but when it was published, it was accepted as part of the general revulsion against Victorianism. Drag & drop your files (not more than 5 at once).

When I was reading this book for my P. exams in a coffee shop, a guy came up to me and asked, "Who's forcing you to read Samuel Butler?"

When I was reading this book for my P. Читать весь отзыв.

Author: Samuel Butler. Release Date: April 22, 2005. Samuel Butleter began to write The Way of All Flesh about the year 1872, and was engaged upon it intermittently until 1884

Author: Samuel Butler. Character set encoding: ISO-646-US (US-ASCII). start of the project gutenberg ebook the way of all flesh . The Way of All Flesh, by Samuel Butler. Samuel Butleter began to write The Way of All Flesh about the year 1872, and was engaged upon it intermittently until 1884. He did not work at it after 1884, but for various reasons he postponed its publication.

Comments

Wymefw Wymefw
It has been about 75 years since I last read "The Way of All Flesh." Now that I am 90 years old the book takes on a whole new meaning, The satire and humor is quintessential British. I love the rich language written at a time when words were cherished. Going back more than a century is a wonderful form of time travel. This is a classic, as it was in my youth.
Ynonno Ynonno
Published in 1903 (but written in the 1870s), this book is ranked 12th on the Modern Library list of 100 Best English Language novels of the 20th Century -- and it is quite good.

If you love big sprawling novels you can get lost in, you will enjoy this book. Spanning multiple generations, it is the tale of the Pontifex family, but focused mostly on the unlucky Ernest Pontifex. Hampered by a set of hypocritical and nasty parents, Ernest spends the first part of his life stumbling from mistake to mistake. It's handled in a witty way that makes it a comical tragedy. Butler was a very talented writer -- not only does he create wonderful characters, he brings their world to life and make you care about things like "high" versus "low" church debates. The narrator's voice is dry and enjoyable -- the book is packed with magnificent one-liners and well-phrased observations. Butler has a point to make about how parents treat children and the best way to grow to full maturity, but he doesn't neglect his story to make it.

As far as formatting, the Kindle version has pretty standard formatting. You don't have lots of white space between chapters (do you really need this to enjoy a book?) and you don't have a active table of contents -- but these aren't standard for free classics anyway. What you get is a free classic in a format that is perfectly readable with virtually no errors.
Linn Linn
Butler didn't want this book published until after his death, and I can see why. his views on real morality, as well as religion, would certainly have been scandalous to many Victorian era Brits. This is one of those long books you don't want to end, though the end was satisfying. The writer is clever and coy, and though he writes about one character, he is sure that an equally important character is the narrator himself. It is fun to read when you have the time to enjoy some side reading into the little excursions into philosophy and history he offers.
Nikojas Nikojas
Salman Rushdie proclaims that understanding one life requires a knowledge of the entire history of the world. This immense book doesn't quite accomplish this goal, but it does provide enough background to give true insight into the protagonist. The pace is slow, and this might dissuade some readers, but the quality of the writing rewards patience. This is a classic that lives up to its acclaim.
Akisame Akisame
I found the better part of this book good enough to overcome some of it's trivial (duller) content.

How the author chose the title... or how it relates to the book
is still a mystery to me.

A very readable book, especially for it's genre!
SoSok SoSok
I might not have had the patience to read this 19th Century classic when I was young but, having aged a bit, I thoroughly enjoyed the rich writing style, the gentle humor, and the word portrait the book created of another place, time, and sensibility.
Watikalate Watikalate
I won't comment on the Kindle edition-vs-the hard copy of this book, but on the book itself. Having heard of it forever, when the Kindle version came out, free, I went for it, and was amazed. It was written in the 1860's, but not published until Butler's death in 1903 or 1905, and the reader can see why. It's a semi-autobiographical novel about a young man growing up in rural surroundings in nineteenth-century England. His father, the local curate, and all the other "pillars" of English society are shown to be hopelessly pompous, ignorant hypocrites, while still believable as characters. When he finally comes into some money,independently, his entire wretched family pitches in to convince him, first, that he is unworthy of such good fortune, and, second, that he should give it all to them. Butler's writing style is to leave most of the dialogue indirect, so there aren't a lot of quotation marks in the book, but that gives him plenty of room to offer snide comments on the proceedings. The resulting style is like a three-way cross between Jane Austen, Charles Dickens, and Anthony Burgess.