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eBook Between the Assassinations ePub

eBook Between the Assassinations ePub

by Aravind Adiga

  • ISBN: 1439152926
  • Category: World Literature
  • Subcategory: Literature
  • Author: Aravind Adiga
  • Language: English
  • Publisher: Free Press (June 9, 2009)
  • Pages: 339
  • ePub book: 1306 kb
  • Fb2 book: 1371 kb
  • Other: rtf lit txt azw
  • Rating: 4.9
  • Votes: 906

Description

On India's south-western coast, between Goa and Calicut, lies Kittur – a small, nondescript every town. Between the Assassinations.

On India's south-western coast, between Goa and Calicut, lies Kittur – a small, nondescript every town. Aravind Adiga acts as our guide to the town, mapping overlapping lives of Kittur's residents. Here, an illiterate Muslim boy working at the train station finds himself tempted by an Islamic terrorist; a bookseller is arrested for selling a copy of "The Satanic Verses"; a rich, spoiled, half-caste student decides to explode a bomb in school; a sexologist has to find a cure for a young boy who may have AIDS.

Between the Assassinations is unified by its preoccupation with the inner lives of Indians mired in an intricate . Bernard Manzo, Financial Times. Also by Aravind Adiga. First published in India in 2008 by Picador India

Between the Assassinations is unified by its preoccupation with the inner lives of Indians mired in an intricate system of social control. In increments of concretely realized detail, Adiga builds his portrait of Kittu. mpassioned and involving. Kevin Power, Sunday Business Post. First published in India in 2008 by Picador India.

Adiga Aravind Читать онлайн Between the Assassinations. Between the Assassinations

The terrain of the town is hilly; the soil is black and mildly acidic. Читать онлайн Between the Assassinations.

Between the Assassinations is the second book published by Aravind Adiga though it was written before his first book The White Tiger

Between the Assassinations is the second book published by Aravind Adiga though it was written before his first book The White Tiger. The title refers to the period between the assassinations of Indira Gandhi in 1984 and her son, Rajiv Gandhi, in 1991. Indira Gandhi was the serving Prime Minister of India when she was assassinated; Rajiv Gandhi became Prime Minister in 1984, and left office following his party's defeat in the 1989 general election.

Between the Assassinations book. Welcome to Kittur, India. It's on India's southwestern. Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem.

Between the Assassinations. Aravind Adiga acts as our guide to the town, mapping overlapping lives of Kittur’s residents. Author: Aravind Adiga. On India’s south-western coast, between Goa and Calicut, lies Kittur – a small, nondescript every town. Aravind Adiga acts as our guide to the town, mapping overlapping lives of Kittur’s residents

This book is effectively a collection of short stories told from the perspective of different people all residing in the same town.

Only 15 left in stock (more on the way). Only 8 left in stock (more on the way). This book is effectively a collection of short stories told from the perspective of different people all residing in the same town. What I liked about it: - occassionally characters meet (although dont expect much of this).

Aravind Adiga's short stories take us where other writers fear to tread, says Vikas Swarup

Aravind Adiga's short stories take us where other writers fear to tread, says Vikas Swarup. You have gone into the countryside and seen life there, unlike ninety per cent of our writers. Arriving in kittur: Kittur is on India ’s southwestern coast, between Goa and Calicut, and almost equidistant from the two. It is bounded by the Arabian Sea to the west, and by the Kaliamma River to the south and east. The terrain of the town is hilly; the soil is black and mildly acidic. The monsoons arrive in June, and besiege the town through September. The following three months are dry and cool, and are the best time to visit Kittur. Given the town’s richness of history and scenic beauty, and.

Welcome to Kittur, India. It's on India's southwestern coast, bounded by the Arabian Sea to the west and the Kaliamma River to the south and east. It's blessed with rich soil and scenic beauty, and it's been around for centuries. Of its 193,432 residents, only 89 declare themselves to be without religion or caste. And if the characters in Between the Assassinations are any indication, Kittur is an extraordinary crossroads of the brightest minds and the poorest morals, the up-and-coming and the downtrodden, and the poets and the prophets of an India that modern literature has rarely addressed.

A twelve-year-old boy named Ziauddin, a gofer at a tea shop near the railway station, is enticed into wrongdoing because a fair-skinned stranger treats him with dignity and warmth. George D'Souza, a mosquito-repellent sprayer, elevates himself to gardener and then chauffeur to the lovely, young Mrs. Gomes, and then loses it all when he attempts to be something more. A little girl's first act of love for her father is to beg on the street for money to support his drug habit. A factory owner is forced to choose between buying into underworld economics and blinding his staff or closing up shop. A privileged schoolboy, using his own ties to the Kittur underworld, sets off an explosive in a Jesuit-school classroom in protest against casteism. A childless couple takes refuge in a rapidly diminishing forest on the outskirts of town, feeding a group of "intimates" who visit only to mock them. And the loneliest member of the Marxist-Maoist Party of India falls in love with the one young woman, in the poorest part of town, whom he cannot afford to wed.

Between the Assassinations showcases the most beloved aspects of Adiga's writing to brilliant effect: the class struggle rendered personal; the fury of the underdog and the fire of the iconoclast; and the prodigiously ambitious narrative talent that has earned Adiga acclaim around the world and comparisons to Gogol, Ellison, Kipling, and Palahniuk. In the words of The Guardian (London), "Between the Assassinations shows that Adiga...is one of the most important voices to emerge from India in recent years."

A blinding, brilliant, and brave mosaic of Indian life as it is lived in a place called Kittur, Between the Assassinations, with all the humor, sympathy, and unflinching candor of The White Tiger, enlarges our understanding of the world we live in today.

Comments

Dishadel Dishadel
I decided to read this book after having really enjoyed "The White Tiger". In this book, Aravind Adiga does another terrific job of describing the realities of India. I am not a big fan of short story formats as I prefer a longer and more comprehensive stories. I think the thing I did not like about these stories was the lack of respect people seem to have for each other in the Indian culture and the negative outcome that occurred to virtually all of the main characters in these short stories. I have been to India and met many Indians and I cannot fathom that it is as bad as portrayed by by the author. Nonetheless I appreciate his story telling skills and plan to read other of his books.
Pringles Pringles
I was so happy to find other novels by Aravind Adiga. Read White Tiger a year or so ago and now I have two more earlier novels of his. He is wonderful at character development, writes very well and keeps the reader interested. In this book he showcases the different lives of the caste system in India and the different religions all clustered in one area. I enjoy learning about his culture through his novels. The next one Last Man in the Tower is even BETTER!
Ieslyaenn Ieslyaenn
I enjoyed reading these stories. The author was able to bring to life a rainbow of characters set in an India that may or may not exist anymore - the world is changing very fast.

The stories are an easy read. Rich characters and interesting narrative kept me looking for more. An easy way to step into the culture and custom of a nation. Most enjoyable read.
Iseared Iseared
I really have mixed feelings about this one. I read The White Tiger and I loved it. I had to read it for school and it turned out to be a book that I would want to read on my own. I have put this book down half way through and I will finish it but I don't know when. The White Tiger is 5 stars. This one may drop to a 2 star depending on the second half of the book...
Vaua Vaua
Aravind Adiga is one of India's most refreshing contributions to the world of books in recent years. His first novel, a wildly original story of near-mythic proportions, "The White Tiger," won the UK's prestigious Man Booker Prize.

"Between the Assassinations" is a latticework of fourteen interrelated stories about the people of Kittur, a small town "on India's southwestern coast, between Goa and Calicut." The organizing principle of this book is the tourist guide, as each story begins with a walk through one of Kittur's distinctive neighborhoods, giving the reader a view of the town's humanity in all its extraordinary diversity. The stories in this collection are set in the tumultuous time in Indian history between the assassination of Prime Minister Indira Gandhi in 1984 and that of her son, Rajiv, seven years later.

A casual visitor to India inevitably remarks on the abject poverty to be found among so many of that country's people. What remains invisible to the tourist comes to life in this remarkable collection of stories: the hopes, fears, doubts, and convictions of India's poor, and the survival strategies they forge in the midst of challenges the rest of us cannot conceive. As a portrait of caste and class and intercommunal (HinduMuslim) relations in modern India, this book truly excels.

(From Mal Warwick's Blog on Books)
Goldcrusher Goldcrusher
I so loved White Tiger that I was thrilled to discover Between the Assassinations.

This book is effectively a collection of short stories told from the perspective of different people all residing in the same town.

What I liked about it:
- occassionally characters meet (although dont expect much of this).
- the author provides a choronological account of events that take place in India and Kittal which then relate to the short stories that you have read about. (However, I thought that this should have been put up front, as it would've made far more sense to the reader whilst progressing through the book).
- accounts of India and Indian life are portrayed very well and doesnt make the reader work "too hard" to imagine him/herself immersed in the setting.

What I didnt like about it:
- no story line (this was "sort of" picked up with the chronology of events at the end, but by time I had gotten to this I had forgotten some relevant content in many of the stories so it was lost)
- quite slow moving

I think the author could've worked this better perhaps by developing relationships between the characters in the book or providing a bit more convincing storyline.

In any event, I do recommend this book, just not highly. I didnt thoroughly enjoy it but it was readable.
Onoxyleili Onoxyleili
Adiga is a very good story teller. Most of the stories are compelling well written and full of some "real life" characters. Enjoyed most of the book except that the last couple of stories seem to unable to keep to the standard set by the earlier ones. Nevertheless a book worth reading.
A most enjoyable reading experience.